Weight Loss Support - Waist to Hip Measurement and Health risks...




runningfromfat
05-16-2011, 09:12 AM
So a waist-to-hip measurement of 0.8 and below is considered to be at the lowest risk for heart disease, right? (see (http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/fitness_articles.asp?id=776), for example) However, I was wondering if that is ONLY if you're at a healthy BMI or not? My hip-to-waist measurement is currently 0.77 but I'm still technically obese by my BMI (30.7).

I've also read that your waist size is a better indicator of your health than BMI and if you have a waist size of less than 35" for females (see (http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-assess-health-risk-with-waist-size-measurem.html)) than you're not longer in the "high" category risk (ideally I read somewhere that it should be less than half your height in inches). So I have a 34" waist, which means I'm not longer be in the high risk range. Going by the half your height thing I should have a 33" waist or less, so it's something to work towards...

I'm just trying to figure out my current health risks because we'd like TTC in the near future. Obviously, I'm going to continue to try to lose weight but it's going really, really slowly so I'm wondering if these are better indicators of my current health. Then I could put my goal before TTC as getting a 32" waist? Thoughts?


runningfromfat
05-16-2011, 01:37 PM
:kickcan: Anybody? ;)

mandalinn82
05-16-2011, 02:10 PM
The two biggest markers for actual health risks in an individual are waist-to-hip and waist measurement. Women should aim to have a waist-to-hip of less than .8, and a waist size of less than 35 inches.

BMI correlates much less to actual health outcomes than either of the above measures. You don't need a "normal" BMI in order to have the reduced risks associated with either of the above measures.


ERHR
05-16-2011, 02:47 PM
I always get confused by the word "waist." Does this measurement refer to the narrowest part of my torso/abdomen or 1" above my belly button or some other location?

runningfromfat
05-16-2011, 04:03 PM
The two biggest markers for actual health risks in an individual are waist-to-hip and waist measurement. Women should aim to have a waist-to-hip of less than .8, and a waist size of less than 35 inches.

BMI correlates much less to actual health outcomes than either of the above measures. You don't need a "normal" BMI in order to have the reduced risks associated with either of the above measures.

Ok, so even though by BMI I'm obese, I basically have the health risks of a "normal" person? Wow, that's crazy! :dizzy: I guess I'm just a little shocked that that's happening at 190lbs...

I always get confused by the word "waist." Does this measurement refer to the narrowest part of my torso/abdomen or 1" above my belly button or some other location?

I took it at the narrowest part of my waist so about 1-2" above the belly button (obviously that would depend on how long your torso is). For me right at my belly button is 35" and 36" when I'm bloated so I'm sure hoping that's not where they're measuring. ;)

ETA: so are there any health risk associated purely on BMI (assuming you're not Mr. Universe or something)?