General chatter - Phy Ed Job interview Q: How wld you answer this?




fitness4life
05-09-2011, 07:41 PM
Interviewer: "How would you define 'success' in teaching phy ed?

Me: "Kids here are at a tender age when it comes to body image. Success is, when the student graduates, they can look at themselves and be happy about their fitness knowing they have the tools to change what they can, and also be happy and embrace the things that they can't. For a student to be able to navigate fitness fact from fiction and have the confidence and knowledge to further their healthy lifestyle."

NO facial cues from the interview panel indicating how "good" of an answer this was.

How'd I do? How would you answer this question? What do you expect your child to get out of school gym class?


fitness4life
05-09-2011, 07:43 PM
Crud. I clicked the wrong forum. Meant to be posted in general chatter. Can a moderator please change the forum for me? Thanks.

Edited to say Thanks moderators!!

patchworkpenguin
05-09-2011, 08:09 PM
I liked your answer! Shows you are there to focus on the kids attitudes, goals and fitness.


Scarlett
05-09-2011, 08:56 PM
I'm not saying my opinion is worth much, but I honestly didn't love your answer. It sounds a little BSey to me. As a phys ed teacher you get at most 30 minutes per day with the students. I don't think thatís enough time to give students enough "in class" training to dramatically increase their fitness level. It's definitely not enough time to do this AND give them all the tools they need to navigate fact from fiction and have everything they need for the rest of their lives. A college course probably couldn't cover all that. While body image is a serious issue, I don't think this comes into the realm of phys ed.

My answer would focus on phys ed as a tool to show students being active is fun and worthwhile. Interest them in physical activity so that they are more active in their spare time, hopefully creating lifelong habits. Give students the confidence to go out for sports. Hopefully the small amount of time you have with them can generate an interest in an active lifestyle. IMO thatís the best you can hope for.

Porthardygurl
05-10-2011, 07:17 AM
My answer would be:
Well.. i believe that success in teaching phys ed is not when my student is able to throw a basketball from the 3 point line, its not when a student can run 100 metres in under 30 seconds or a kid being able to throw long in football. Success from teaching phys-ed is not the ability to be a good athlete, or to even win an award at the end of the year. Its not about how many people in my gym class will go on to win scholarships or play for major sports teams all over the world. Success Sir, is not defined by what you can do, but who you are. My job as a teacher is not to make sure that they can win on the field. My job is to make sure that they win in the areas that count. My job is to make sure that what i teach them on the field, translates into life lessons that they will carry with them throughout life. Weather that is through learning respect for themselves, learning respect for there families or learning respect for people they have never known. Its about teaching them about giving there best..not just giving 95% and quitting, but teaching them how to give it there best..110%.. If at the end of the day, i have changed the life of one child by changing his view of the world and how he approaches his life circumstances, then i have successfully taught my student.

Thats what i would say...

I dont care if my kid can throw a ball or shoot a hoop..i want my kid to get an understanding of what it means to work hard and live a life of perserverance..to learn morals and values..respect.. I want them to know about being a team..not being solo. I want them to know how to face a challenge and succesfully overcome it through tools that the teacher taught in class..I want to see confidence built, self esteem raised and well..if at the end of the year..they have gotten into shape ...well..what more could i ask for?

fatferretfanatic
05-10-2011, 07:39 AM
I liked your answer, because part of what I believe to be success in teaching and phys ed. is to be able to show students why it is important, etc. Getting through to the students is the biggest thing, IMO. When we had to run one mile in high school, I was significantly overweight and self conscious. I knew I'd be the slowest runner and probably get grief for it, so I just walked. Not only did I walk, I walked intentionally slow because I was so displeased with the exercise. Next time, I did not have to run, but instead was allowed to staple tests. If I were the teacher in that situation, I might have at least tried talking to the student about why they were insecure. My teacher seemed to have no words for me.

fitness4life
05-10-2011, 10:26 AM
Interesting comments. This was the last question in the 45 minute interview. Everything suggested by you guys was already covered and I was trying to sum it up in the fewest words possible.

So I guess what you guys have told me is that I nailed my interview! I kind of already thought that I did.

Scarlet - I'm happy that you felt comfortable giving me your honest opinion. I just want to let you know that the question was geared toward a child who had had me as a teacher from elementary through high school (the position is K-12). I think it's entirely possible to teach a child all their is about fitness and living a healthy lifestyle - appropriate topics and increments at each age - during their school years. It's the same for math, for instance. The goal isn't to get from 2+2 to calculus in a single year. KWIM? Also, the district is increasing their h.s. class time to 60 minutes and kids will have phy ed 3 times a week. My guess is that that amount of activity is far above what average adults make time for themselves. Thanks for your input! :)

Lovely
05-10-2011, 02:28 PM
I have NO idea what school systems look for when hiring, so I'm afraid I'm no good there, but I can tell you what I'd wished for when I was younger.

I'd wished that Phys Ed had shown me that there are ways to have fun while being active. That it was more than just standing around to be picked last for the team. That maybe if you hate team sports there are still things you can do to be active on your own. Or maybe we all should've been doing activities that trained us for that President's Fitness Challenge instead of randomly being asked to do a pull-up when I didn't even know what a pull-up was and then failed, because I'd never trained to do a pull-up in the first place! *Ahem* That test annoyed me so much as a kid...not that teachers could get out of it or anything.

For a student to be able to navigate fitness fact from fiction and have the confidence and knowledge to further their healthy lifestyle.

I really liked that last line. =)