Weight Loss Support - A Cheat Day-- I want to but I'm scared.




Txalupa
04-12-2011, 12:12 PM
Hi everyone, just wondering what thoughts were about "Cheat Days."

I have been following Jorge Cruise's Belly Fat Cure since March 1, 2010. I have had GREAT success on this plan. This is why I'm scared.

The plan allows for 15 grams of sugar per day and 6 servings of carbs. I'm at a comfortable weight right now. I would like to get lower, but slow and steady.

I am thinking of allowing myself a cheat day once per financial quarter. Jan-March, April-June (I'm an accountant, this is how I think), because once a month is just too much for me.

The thing is, I'm terrified!! I am in the utmost control of my eating, and I don't want to lose it. However, I would love to have a chocolate covered strawberry at Easter brunch and a bite or two of cake at my friend's wedding in August.

Am I nuts? Do other people do this? What are the consequences?

Thanks ladies and gents in advance! :hug:


konfyoozed
04-12-2011, 12:33 PM
everything in moderation and you'll be fine.

if it's one or two dipped strawberries (not the whole pile), or one piece of cake (not 5) then you should be okay. i'm not sure how you measure in your diet plan, but if you go over on sugars/carbs, and get right back on plan the next day... does it affect you significantly? or maybe just a pound of water gain that will drop off within a couple days?

i'm not anywhere near close to being at my goal, actually i've just started. but i do allow myself a treat now and then, and the scale is still moving downward at a fairly steady pace. if you can 'cheat' without triggering a succession of binges and then regain, go for it and enjoy the cake :)

indiblue
04-12-2011, 12:44 PM
My plan is not nearly as strict as yours so I have no problem incorporating a bite (or full slice) of cake here or there. I calorie count and sometimes that slice of cake, slice of pizza, etc fits into the daily caloric allotment, sometimes it puts me over. I overall am running a good caloric deficit though and exercising a lot, so that's what matters to me. I can't say whether or not a bite of cake will throw your plan off, since I'm not familiar with that specific diet or low-carb diets in general, but I do hope you're able to enjoy special occasions without worrying too much. Temporary increases in weight from sodium intake or eating a little more on a special vacation or event for me are totally worth the experiences and not worth stressing out over, in my opinion :)


surfergirl2
04-12-2011, 01:00 PM
Are you worried about the extra calories or the extra carbs? Either way, i believe in cheat days, and not just for enjoyment purposes, but they can actually benefit you in weight loss. Do some research on carb-up days if you are restricting carbs--carb-up days may make you gain water weight temporarily, but once you immediately go back to low-carb, it helps you lose faster. And aside from carbs, i believe a higher calorie day once in a while benefits people restricting calories too--it doesn't make you gain that much weight but once you go back to the lower calories, it kind of shocks your body and you lose faster. This is my theory and what i've experienced.

And personally, i would eat the entire slice of cake :) I don't mean to be a bad influence...but if i'm going to have a cheat day, i'm going to enjoy it.

Katydid77
04-12-2011, 01:17 PM
Please don't set yourself up with an unsustainable lifestyle. Life is about flexibility and adapting yourself to the moment, not trying to bend every moment to conform to you.

You have found something that works for you (and that is GREAT!!), but you can't live in fear of deviating from it a bit every now and then.

Think about it, you are worrying over a couple of strawberries and a piece of cake that you might eat months from now. Your body is not suddenly unable to handle a teeny bit sugar or non-plan carbs. You have lived your whole life consuming them, and while you might not have felt the best, and was at a weight you didn't like, it's not like you were at death's door or anything.

I do IF, and I do it pretty religiously. (I know you do too :D) My family knows my eating window, etc, but I leave a space in there for real life to happen. I give myself 'get out of jail free' cards of sorts, and can randomly have a couple days a month where I don't follow the eating window.

A few weeks ago my pregnant SIL was having a really tough day and just wanted to set down and eat lunch somewhere. I didn't say "no, I don't eat till 4pm and you know it", I just realized it was an important moment and relaxed and enjoyed my lunch. Could I have said, 'no you eat, I'll go with you and drink unsweet tea'? Yes, I could have, but my diet is only part of my life, and I refuse to allow it to take over my life and make everything else conform to it.

I have to live and you do too.

Let's face it, our families and loved ones have to put up with a lot when we are on these diets. Sometimes it's important to do little things that show them we care for them too. It's not just about them supporting us, it's about us showing them that we love and care for them too, and recognizing how much they put up with. Sometimes that requires us showing them that we are willing to break our little absolutes, just because they are so important.

One strawberry. One piece of cake. One lunch with less than perfect ingredients. These are all so abstract and small within the overall view of things.

You've dieted like you have to give yourself CONTROL of your life, NOT to lose control by living in fear of the smallest things. You have earned that.

Live life to the fullest, and enjoy every moment!

sacha
04-12-2011, 01:17 PM
I think becoming comfortable with this is part of the journey.

I went from 5'5 and around 165lbs to 5'5 and around 110lbs. Underweight. I am now back up to around 128ish but with an athletic physique. That journey took several years.

When we were overweight and then lost that weight, and still wanted to be smaller despite being at the lower end of normal, we sort of go from one extreme to another. At 110lbs, I was TERRIFIED of gaining back the weight and getting fat again, to the point where my reasoning became rather arbitrary (2 bites of a cake at a wedding... to fear this, is somewhat irrational would you say?)

It's not the cake you fear, it's derailing your progress if you give up what you think is complete control. Part of the maintenance journey is allowing yourself to have complete control without arbitrary restrictions and irrational restrictions. To live life in moderation. This is the part of maintenance that manys truggle with and why people say maintenance is harder.

Realistically, you will get older, maybe have babies (not sure your situation or age?), and life is not something that can be so strictly controlled. You realistically will not be following Jorge's plan until your deathbed (as an old lady!). My suggestion, now at 5'6 and 127lbs, is that you focus less on strict rules & control, and focus more on how to incorporate "LIFE" into your plan. This doesn't mean binging or 'losing control', but how to realistically feel OKAY and COMFORTABLE with an easter chocolate or a whole slice of wedding cake.

Good luck :) I am only NOW comfortable with this, 7 years since the day I chose to lose weight.

sacha
04-12-2011, 01:19 PM
And Katydid77, I agree 100%.

"You've dieted like you have to give yourself CONTROL of your life, NOT to lose control by living in fear of the smallest things. You have earned that."

Txalupa
04-12-2011, 01:27 PM
And Katydid77, I agree 100%.

"You've dieted like you have to give yourself CONTROL of your life, NOT to lose control by living in fear of the smallest things. You have earned that."

You guys are so right! I think I'm just afraid to mess with a plan that is already REALLY flexible. I mean, I've fit it into every holiday, birthday, wedding that I've been to in the last year. I eat this way instinctively now.

I don't track my food anymore, I just KNOW if things fit into my food day or they don't.

I need to just TRUST myself to eat whatever I want four (planned) days a year.

Thank you for the help! :D

sacha
04-12-2011, 01:29 PM
I'm not really familiar with Jorge's plan but I do think that at this stage of the game, you can really start to trust yourself to incorporate 'life' in general. March 2010-now is over a year, I think it's no longer your plan but just your intuitive way of doing it. Go have fun! It's not a fallback, it's part of the journey, to feel comfortable to do so.

Txalupa
04-12-2011, 01:35 PM
I'm not really familiar with Jorge's plan but I do think that at this stage of the game, you can really start to trust yourself to incorporate 'life' in general. March 2010-now is over a year, I think it's no longer your plan but just your intuitive way of doing it. Go have fun! It's not a fallback, it's part of the journey, to feel comfortable to do so.

Congrats on getting this far and being comfortable, Sacha!!

You're right, I need to let go a little, two bites of cake is ridiculous!!!!!!!! I will see how it goes on Easter. Then Monday, I will go back to my normal foods. I think I'm more scared of the tummy ache I will have if I eat a whole piece of cake!

joyfulloser
04-12-2011, 02:14 PM
I've eaten a cheat MEAL about once per week since Sept '10, and I've lost consistenly.:)

That said...while I don't think that an entire CHEAT DAY will derail months worth of efforts, I don't agree with the mindset that it creates. I much rather feel having a CHEAT MEAL is mentally healthier. An entire day of cheating could lead to gorging/bingeing...whereas a CHEAT MEAL is just one meal...the rest of the day is spent eating on plan.

In any event...ENJOY!:D

Txalupa
04-12-2011, 02:47 PM
I've eaten a cheat MEAL about once per week since Sept '10, and I've lost consistenly.:)

That said...while I don't think that an entire CHEAT DAY will derail months worth of efforts, I don't agree with the mindset that it creates. I much rather feel having a CHEAT MEAL is mentally healthier. An entire day of cheating could lead to gorging/bingeing...whereas a CHEAT MEAL is just one meal...the rest of the day is spent eating on plan.

In any event...ENJOY!:D

I'm excited that this works for you!! I guess I just know myself, and I know that I don't eat square 'meals' every day, and that I would probably streeeeeeeeeeeeeeetch a meal into a few hours.

However, if I wake up and it's "Sugar Day" as I'm going to call it, then from when I get up, to when I go to bed, or midnight is when it's ok to eat something that is off-plan. Next day is on plan until next quarters planned Sugar Day"

Thank you for all of the support and comments! :D

JohnP
04-12-2011, 02:56 PM
I think it is really crucial for you to realize that Jorge is a great marketer and not a dietary mastermind. (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=ntt_at_ep_srch?ie=UTF8&search-alias=books&field-author=Jorge+Cruise&sort=relevancerank)

You've lost a lot following his diet because of calorie restriction not because of his plan and the magic it causes no matter what his book says.

It's not cheap but since you're an accountant you might like the scientific viewpoint of Lyle McDonald's Flexible Dieting and certainly it would free you from your restrictive way of thinking.

stacygee
04-12-2011, 03:14 PM
OPinion from someone who has done cheat days for 4 months.

I was terrified to do a cheat meal at first too. I don't do DAYS... I do a cheat MEAL. I actually still try to stay within my calorie limit of 1500 calories. I do a cheat meal every 2 weeks unless I have deviated from my eating plan. If I have deviated from my eating plan then I wait two weeks from the deviation. My cheat meals have been mainly hamburgers with a bun or 2 slices of pizza with bacon and beef toppng. Several times I have missed my cheat day becasue I splurge on silly things like a nighttime bowl of cereal or cookies or Valentines Chocolate.

I have not gained any extra weight from my cheat meals. I may go up a pound the morning after but then I might drop a couple the second or thrid day.

The "cheats" that negatively impact my weight loss are the ones when I have lost control and had 2 bowls or cereal, 2 snack bars and cookies all at once.

I controlled cheat meal is refreshing and rewarding... out of control cheating just makes you feel BAD!

joyfulloser
04-12-2011, 03:38 PM
You've lost a lot following his diet because of calorie restriction not because of his plan and the magic it causes...

But then again...isn't this the same with ALL diet fads?:cool: I just think people feel more "comfortable" with certain ways of eating (i.e. IF, Atkins, etc.) Bottom line...as most of us here have figured out...it's calories in vs. calories out (this barring genetics, macros, etc.)

I controlled cheat meal is refreshing and rewarding... out of control cheating just makes you feel BAD!

Aint dat the truth RUTH!:p WELL SAID!:D My cheat meal is usually upwards between 800-1000 calories (NO DESSERT!):o I could only imagine the disaster of me having an entire DAY of that..haha!

xty
04-12-2011, 03:45 PM
I think how careful people tend to be relates to more than just 'going off plan'.

Most of the people above seem to be addressing the specific 'cheat' and its impact overall from a calorie/carb perspective.

My personal issues revolve around carb intake and how that relates to my food addiction and binge issues. If you have underlying disordered eating that you feel strongly in control of, that still may not be a reason to never eat a 'treat'...it may mean you need to be more thoughtful in the approach of how you execute the 'treat'. For example, will you be able to stop at the 1 strawberry or half a piece of cake? If not, can you ask for a friend to help restrain you if need be?

If you dont have disordered eating, then I agree that it should be fine :)

Txalupa
04-12-2011, 05:06 PM
I think it is really crucial for you to realize that Jorge is a great marketer and not a dietary mastermind. (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=ntt_at_ep_srch?ie=UTF8&search-alias=books&field-author=Jorge+Cruise&sort=relevancerank)

You've lost a lot following his diet because of calorie restriction not because of his plan and the magic it causes no matter what his book says.

It's not cheap but since you're an accountant you might like the scientific viewpoint of Lyle McDonald's Flexible Dieting and certainly it would free you from your restrictive way of thinking.

Hi John, I always appreciate your posts!! While I agree that Jorge is not a nutritional mastermind, I have found that his guidelines in the book give me a black and white (accountant's) view of what I can and can't have.

It is similar to calorie counting in that if my calorie limit is 2000, and I have 400 left, then I can eat a 400 cal item. However, Jorge's plan addresses a bigger issue for me, being pre-diabetic, which gives me a handle on my sugar and carbs.

Thanks for everyone's input, I am more grateful than you know, and I enjoy everyone's posts. :hug:

mom4life
04-12-2011, 06:15 PM
I calorie count as well. I give myself one cheat day a week. Like my dh says "If you cheat one day its fine, you'll only gain if you're cheating everyday. One day won't make a difference." He's right! My cheat day is Friday, I only cheat for dinner. Though I do try to limit my calories through out the day to allow for more calories for dinner so it doesn't break the bank. Yes, calories have become like money for me. LOL

JohnP
04-12-2011, 06:46 PM
Hi John, I always appreciate your posts!! While I agree that Jorge is not a nutritional mastermind, I have found that his guidelines in the book give me a black and white (accountant's) view of what I can and can't have.

It is similar to calorie counting in that if my calorie limit is 2000, and I have 400 left, then I can eat a 400 cal item. However, Jorge's plan addresses a bigger issue for me, being pre-diabetic, which gives me a handle on my sugar and carbs.

Understood.

I'm not sure how you determined you were pre-diabetic but I assume it was through blood tests. Insulin sensativity goes up as you lose weight so I would guess you are no longer pre-diabetic especially since I know you're practicing IF which would be much tougher if you were having any kind of blood sugar issues and you don't seem to be having any issues.

I'm not saying start eating cake and candy bars for breakfast but there is no difference between sugars. Sugar is sugar. You eat fruit on Mr Jorge's diet yes? Pure sugar + fiber. Even has the dreaded fructose!:dizzy:

Cake is just a lot of sugar + fat + flour + eggs. Trust me your body doesn't know the difference once you have ingested it. I'd guess depending on the cake and size of slice you're looking at 200-500 calories. Sure that represents a lot of fruit at once but it's not something you're doing every day.

The key of course if moderation. Once a quarter is not moderation. Too strict.

Txalupa
04-12-2011, 07:13 PM
Understood.

I'm not sure how you determined you were pre-diabetic but I assume it was through blood tests. Insulin sensativity goes up as you lose weight so I would guess you are no longer pre-diabetic especially since I know you're practicing IF which would be much tougher if you were having any kind of blood sugar issues and you don't seem to be having any issues.

I'm not saying start eating cake and candy bars for breakfast but there is no difference between sugars. Sugar is sugar. You eat fruit on Mr Jorge's diet yes? Pure sugar + fiber. Even has the dreaded fructose!:dizzy:

Cake is just a lot of sugar + fat + flour + eggs. Trust me your body doesn't know the difference once you have ingested it. I'd guess depending on the cake and size of slice you're looking at 200-500 calories. Sure that represents a lot of fruit at once but it's not something you're doing every day.

The key of course if moderation. Once a quarter is not moderation. Too strict.


Hah! Trust me, I know sugar is sugar is sugar. I eat low sugar fruits (raspberries, blackberries, etc) in small amounts, keeping with the 15/6 always. Also, I choose to get my sugars from vegetables more often, since they have more bang for my sugar buck, so to speak.

My GP determined pre-diabetic using blood tests, and I've been tested twice since beginning the program. She thinks I should stick with BFC since all of my stats have improved, and I do too.

Thanks for the holler!

Focused Lani
04-12-2011, 07:25 PM
I just wanted to add that I'm on plan that has a cheat day weekly. It doesn't derail me or make me lose control. Often I am quite relieved to be back on the plan the next day, as the natural whole foods make me FEEL great.

LisaP916
04-12-2011, 08:04 PM
I don't necessarily have a "cheat" day but the WW plan is flexible enough that I don't stress if I don't eat AS healthy as I should. My WI day is Saturday, so I'm usually a little more lax on the weekends - a couple of beers with friends, breakfast at the local diner on Sunday morning, etc. I am still trying to make better choices and I am tracking what I eat, but I'm not stressing if I'm over points.

I do know there will be a few days where I'll be more off plan than on plan, and that's cool too - Easter Sunday for example.

JohnP
04-12-2011, 08:14 PM
My GP determined pre-diabetic using blood tests, and I've been tested twice since beginning the program. She thinks I should stick with BFC since all of my stats have improved, and I do too.


If the BFC is working and you like it then by all means continue. However, your stats would have improved no matter what dietary plan you followed so long as your calories were restricted and you lost weight - even the twinkie diet.

Here are the stats for the guy that did the Twinkie diet.

His bodyweight drop from 200.8 to 174.2 (-26.6 lbs)
His body-fat percentage drop from 33.4% to 24.% (-8.5%)
His total body-fat drop by 25.25 lbs
His lean body mass (muscle) drop by 1.35 lbs
His total cholesterol drop from 214 to 184
His bad cholesterol (ldl-c) drop from 153 to 123
His good cholesterol (hdl-c) increase from 37 to 46
His blood sugar / glucose level drop from 94 to 75, and
His blood pressure stay around the same pre=108/71 post=104/76

Don't take this as me bashing BFC. I'm not. I'm simply pointing out the falacy of your logic in wondering if you should have a cheat day, or not. From what little I know about Jorge he doesn't believe in cheat meals. My questions would be - why not?

Txalupa
04-12-2011, 09:10 PM
Don't take this as me bashing BFC. I'm not. I'm simply pointing out the falacy of your logic in wondering if you should have a cheat day, or not. From what little I know about Jorge he doesn't believe in cheat meals. My questions would be - why not?

You are right, he doesn't condone cheat meals. He also doesn't allow sucralose (Splenda), which I still use sparingly. He prefers maltitol as a sweetener which gives me stomach aches so I don't use it.

I think I need to keep doing things my way, which will now include a cheat day once in a while! :carrot:

ERHR
04-12-2011, 10:37 PM
I'll give you my perspective as a fellow BFC-er who has not intentionally deviated from the plan's guidelines. I too can see at least one situation in my near future when I would like to go off-plan - eating 1-year-old wedding cake on our anniversary next month. I'm pretty sure I'm going to eat the cake. I figure that while I like the BFC and am going to stay on it for the forseeable future I doubt I will be exactly on this plan for the rest of my life and it would be useful to know how my body reacts to a bolus of sugar/white carbs now that I have retrained it on the BFC.

Will I have cravings for sugar or other carbs that day, the next day, for the next week? Will they be stronger than the cravings I had before? If I can handle a single slice of cake with little-to-no apparent repercussions I will consider the BFC more sustainable. If it stops my loss for a week or causes me to go off-plan again later, I probably won't try it again until I reach my goal weight or find another plan that doesn't cause me to go crazy on sugar when I do eat it.

Also, I disagree with JohnP that the BFC and other low-sugar/moderated-carb plans work solely because of calorie restriction. This is based on my experience with my body, research I have done, and professionals I have spoken with. This is why I haven't to this point taken any cheats on the BFC like I did when I was only calorie-counting.

JohnP
04-13-2011, 02:31 AM
Also, I disagree with JohnP that the BFC and other low-sugar/moderated-carb plans work solely because of calorie restriction. This is based on my experience with my body, research I have done, and professionals I have spoken with. This is why I haven't to this point taken any cheats on the BFC like I did when I was only calorie-counting.

I can't speak for your body but if someone is insulin resistant carbs can make them feel lethargic and thus reduce the output side of the calorie equation. Then there is the whole gluten intollerance issue. Also, for many people low carb diets can be easier to comply to as the consumption of carbs can lead to a greater desire to eat carbs.

Having said that - there has been no good research done that has shown a low carb diet is superior for weight loss when protein is matched or sufficent. If you have some evidence to present by all means please do. I know that there are low carb experts who are professionals but what they are good at is cherry picking data to support their conclusion and ignoring the data that does not.

JohnP
04-13-2011, 02:40 AM
By the way while we're off topic I should point out that there are also plenty of people who will be lethargic on low carb diets and this can affect fat loss in the same way an insulin resistant person is affected by carbs.

Finally and I'm no hormonal expert but some studies have shown that T3 can be repressed more on very low carb diets. (Not that LBF is VLC)

Regardless to suggest it is not calories that is causing fat loss or fat gain is simply wrong.

shannonmb
04-13-2011, 06:51 AM
it would be useful to know how my body reacts to a bolus of sugar/white carbs now that I have retrained it on the BFC.


I agree with this. Chances are low that you will never eat another chocolate covered strawberry or piece of cake. I mean, you could, but at some point you might just want one! Better to know exactly how it is going to affect you in an environment that you control, so that you can gather the data (accountant ;)) that you can use for a lifetime. :D

fancypants
04-13-2011, 07:17 AM
I'm only at the start of my journey but I can't bring myself to "cheat" for fear of regaining what I've already worked so hard to lose ( I know I couldn't possibly pile on 16 pounds in one day) But I suppose I need to prove to myself that I can stay strictly on plan for a few months before I start "cheat days"
My friends organized a surprise Birthday party for me at my favourite restaurant just last week ( none are aware of my diet) All I had was a salad and couldn't bring myself to even have a glass of wine!
I'm hoping that eventually I can allow myself to cheat every now and again, otherwise what's the point?

Txalupa
04-13-2011, 09:16 AM
I agree with this. Chances are low that you will never eat another chocolate covered strawberry or piece of cake. I mean, you could, but at some point you might just want one! Better to know exactly how it is going to affect you in an environment that you control, so that you can gather the data (accountant ;)) that you can use for a lifetime. :D

Exactly!! This is what my thoughts are, thanks Shannon! :D

Txalupa
04-13-2011, 09:20 AM
I'll give you my perspective as a fellow BFC-er who has not intentionally deviated from the plan's guidelines. I too can see at least one situation in my near future when I would like to go off-plan - eating 1-year-old wedding cake on our anniversary next month. I'm pretty sure I'm going to eat the cake. I figure that while I like the BFC and am going to stay on it for the forseeable future I doubt I will be exactly on this plan for the rest of my life and it would be useful to know how my body reacts to a bolus of sugar/white carbs now that I have retrained it on the BFC.

Will I have cravings for sugar or other carbs that day, the next day, for the next week? Will they be stronger than the cravings I had before? If I can handle a single slice of cake with little-to-no apparent repercussions I will consider the BFC more sustainable. If it stops my loss for a week or causes me to go off-plan again later, I probably won't try it again until I reach my goal weight or find another plan that doesn't cause me to go crazy on sugar when I do eat it.

Also, I disagree with JohnP that the BFC and other low-sugar/moderated-carb plans work solely because of calorie restriction. This is based on my experience with my body, research I have done, and professionals I have spoken with. This is why I haven't to this point taken any cheats on the BFC like I did when I was only calorie-counting.


ERHR, thank you for the BFC perspective!! This is the type of situation I'm referring to the EVERY ONCE IN AWHILE chance to have cake, something sweet, etc.

Also, I think that with my body, that it's insulin and fat storage that are affecting my fat loss, rather than calories alone. We can all talk about thermodynamics, calories in calories out, and blood glucose levels until the cows come home, but I truly do not believe in "a calorie is a calorie".


We will all just have to agree to disagree on that front!

annabanana76179
04-14-2011, 02:51 PM
I know that science debates the calorie vs. carb vs. fat issue and that will continue to go on. However, I also know that I have gone for 4 weeks on a calorie restricted diet (doing 30 minutes of cardio 3-4 times a week) and lost 1.8 pounds. The week that I started the BFC, I started on a Thursday and had lost more than that by Saturday. This is my second week and I am anxious to see what the scale says on Saturday. Restricting my carbs has worked in the past. I just could not keep them at 20-40 for the rest of my life. I am curious to hear how a cheat day works for a dieter on a restricted carb/sugar diet.

maydaymayday911
04-14-2011, 06:55 PM
Whether a cheat day will harm or help you during your hardcore diet phase is really up to your personality - are you the kind of person who can eat 1 piece of cake and then do nothing or are you the kind of person who is going to eat 1 piece of cake and then ice cream and then french fries, etc?

But unless you have a medical dietary restriction where some things in certain foods will harm/kill/endanger you, you are going to have to cheat when you are in maintenance. Processed sugar may not be the healthiest thing for you, but you are going to capital-M Miserable if you are afraid to eat cake and ice cream for the rest of your life.

JohnP
04-15-2011, 02:39 PM
I know that science debates the calorie vs. carb vs. fat issue and that will continue to go on. However, I also know that I have gone for 4 weeks on a calorie restricted diet (doing 30 minutes of cardio 3-4 times a week) and lost 1.8 pounds. The week that I started the BFC, I started on a Thursday and had lost more than that by Saturday. This is my second week and I am anxious to see what the scale says on Saturday. Restricting my carbs has worked in the past. I just could not keep them at 20-40 for the rest of my life. I am curious to hear how a cheat day works for a dieter on a restricted carb/sugar diet.

As much as I am beating a dead horse I feel somehow obligated to point out that the reason you lost weight to fast when switching to BFC is because any low carb diet causes glycogen levels to drop in your muscles which means they also release water. In this aspect there is no debate.

A cheat day for a low carber will work just like it works for anyone else assuming they do not use the scale as a means of judging how it worked because the scale may go up due to water weight.