Weight Loss Support - If you knew then what you know now...




Live4Summer13
04-11-2011, 12:44 PM
Okay people.. so i'm fairly new into this 'diet' idea. so one question i have been meaning to ask...

What do you know now that you wish you knew then??

Basically, what are some things (tips, 'tricks', etc) that you wish somebody would have told you back when you first started a diet and had to figure out on your own.

It can be related to food, exercise, etc...


Txalupa
04-11-2011, 12:46 PM
I would have quit the sugar in college and never become fat and tired.

The cupcake fad would not have even affected me.

I would have saved a lot of money on low-fat milk that would spoil before I drank it all.

nickyj
04-11-2011, 12:51 PM
Drink a lot of water before you eat, it will help you feel full faster, also wait 20 minutes after eating to decide if your still hungry.


LandonsBaby
04-11-2011, 12:54 PM
I never would have tried to eat diet or low fat food. I would have gotten a good food scale right away.

Razorbackbritt
04-11-2011, 01:03 PM
I would have told myself that it will take longer than I want to lose it all. I started in September, hoping to be finished losing in March. Its April and I've still got months left to go. I would have prepared myself to be in it for the long haul.

I would also tell myself that holidays and such are NOT about the food. There are countless holidays that I would let myself eat all I wanted (my birthday, hubby's birthday, 4th of july, summer bbqs, thanksgiving, Christmas, Easter, New Years, Valentine's, our anniversary...the list goes on) and those come around so often, that I never had the chance to lose anything until I stopped pigging out at the holidays.

surfergirl2
04-11-2011, 01:06 PM
That sleep is probably the #1 most important thing for weight loss.

caryesings
04-11-2011, 01:07 PM
I wasted 20 years trying to diet and stop bingeing at the same time. Finally I broke the bingeing cycle by not trying to diet at the same time and 4 years later started the diet that I was able to stick to now that I wasn't tempted to binge/diet/binge/diet.

InControl2Day
04-11-2011, 01:12 PM
Stop the BS and buckle down and do it. No one is buying it and you are just hurting yourself.

Make it a lifestyle change and not a temporary miserable diet.

Not hating myself and learning to love myself was big (at ANY size). Loving myself through my journey and not when I'm x weight was important.

Focus on the mini goals and break it up to smaller challenges: a on plan day, an on-plan meal, 30 minutes of exercise a day.

Learn to use the scale as a TOOL and not let it ruin the day. Focusing on the NSV (non-scale victories) was huge too!

Take more fat pictures. I wish I had more before pictures to look at even though I do have plenty :).

Stop comparing myself to other people. There is always someone prettier, younger, richer, thinner, smarter than me. Likewise, there has to be someone who is envious and comparing themselves to me too. (this goes back to loving myself and gaining confidence)

Progress not perfection. Don't go for the all-or-nothing approach, you will lose steam and feel frustrated.

Maintenance requires vigilance too.

There are no absolutes in life. People can change with the right motivation. I never thought I would ENJOY exercise but now I feel restless if I go a day without it.

j0lamo01
04-11-2011, 01:17 PM
Yes, I would tell myself to not give up after not seeing the results I wanted right away. For me it takes longer but if I hadnt have kept going after things got rough then I would have never seen the results that I see now, So I would say give yourself time and you will see results one day

sacha
04-11-2011, 01:18 PM
That weight training would change my life and I would look far better 20lbs heavier with heavy lifting and cardio intervals. That focusing on gaining athletic strength, rather than weight loss, would bring better body composition results. And that healthier alternatives taste just as good.

lackadaisy
04-11-2011, 01:18 PM
Other people will give you "principles," but having done this for just under three months, I can give you a few "regrets":

I regret paying for supplements of any kind.
I regret buying low-cal dessert replacements that just gave me more cravings for the "real thing."
I regret diet soda.
I regret meal replacement bars before I discovered fiber bars.
I regret eyeballing my portions, especially grain portions like cereal.
I regret allowing myself more than one cheat day in a row, ever.

Most of all: I regret every binge, every time I gave up mid-workout, every day I did less than my best.

AshleyRae
04-11-2011, 01:27 PM
I wish I would have written a couple of letters to myself during the weight-loss journey, mostly about all of the benefits to which I was looking forward and describing my excitement and goals. Then, on days when I felt miserable and wanted to give in, I could open a letter to myself from several weeks/months earlier to reinvigorate and regain that initial excitement and discipline. It's really, really easy to forget how far I've come.

Plus, I would have taken pictures of myself at each 5 pound loss so I could see a difference. I've lost over 30 pounds, but I still see my reflection in the mirror as exactly the same. Photos would have helped.

joyfulloser
04-11-2011, 02:44 PM
moderation. that is all:)

WannabeNurse
04-11-2011, 02:48 PM
-that there is no sense in throwing in the towel when weight loss didn't happen for me for one/two/three week(s)...this leads to gaining it all back
-that a diet is not about depriving myself and being hungry all the time
- that there is such a thing as 'skinny fat', and without exercise, that is what I'll eventually become
- when I get hungry, I don't have to eat RIGHT THAT SECOND (I won't die if I'm hungry for a little while, I had to get used to that)
- just because it's x's birthday, doesn't mean I have to eat the cake/pizza etc. If I want results, I can't give in to temptation at every opportunity
- drink lots and lots of water, at least 2L/day, when exercising, more!

GlamourGirl827
04-11-2011, 02:57 PM
If I could only go back 10 years and tell myself:

1. Stop trying to evade eating healthy by buying all diet or fat free versions of the crap...just eat clean. Veggies, fruits, lean meat, whole grains (limited) low fat diary though... Unlike every other "diet" I've been on, you won't find diet pudding in my fridge or diet bars or soy crisps in my kitchen. I used to finish every night with sugar free ice cream...no more. When I do endulge, its real ice cream, and its an occasional treat. I also watch the carbs. They seems to trigger binges for me.

2. Work out even when you fall of the "diet" wagon. Workout with the main goal of improving cardiovascular health. Losing weight from it is just a perk.

3. All or nothing mentality will always leave you with nothing. Because "all" means perfection, which is just not possible.

GlamourGirl827
04-11-2011, 03:00 PM
I regret buying low-cal dessert replacements that just gave me more cravings for the "real thing."
I regret diet soda.
.

:cp:

ERHR
04-11-2011, 03:08 PM
I would tell myself that "cheat days" or "cheat meals" are counterproductive both physically and mentally. When I'm following a good (flexible) plan I don't need to cheat.

ilidawn
04-11-2011, 03:09 PM
1. I would've kept up on yoga and stretching because all I've done is make excuses.
2. Eating a little too much is no reason to say "well, since I'm over, I may as well do it right and pig out".
3. Healthy food can be a lot more affordable than I initially thought.
4. A lil extra time to pamper myself does wonders for the mind. Thinking I've no time or I'm not worth it just leads to more poor choices.
5. Just because I'm craving lots of random foods doesn't mean I need to eat them all at that point in time. There's always tomorrow...and if there isn't a tomorrow then it's not like it matters anymore lol.
6. Last but not least I would've told myself I needed to love myself first and not lose myself thinking my worth is what others say it is.

Txalupa
04-11-2011, 03:10 PM
I would tell myself that "cheat days" or "cheat meals" are counterproductive both physically and mentally. When I'm following a good (flexible) plan I don't need to cheat.

This!!!! Love it, ERHR, love BFC!! :D

Dorian5
04-11-2011, 03:11 PM
Stop comparing myself to other people. There is always someone prettier, younger, richer, thinner, smarter than me. Likewise, there has to be someone who is envious and comparing themselves to me too. (this goes back to loving myself and gaining confidence)




This. :yes:

JenMusic
04-11-2011, 03:16 PM
Weight loss (and I include maintenance in that!) is a marathon, not a sprint. I need to focus on here and now and let tomorrow handle itself.

I'm not going to gain back 5 or 10 pounds with one day of overeating, so there's no sense beating myself up over it. I need to learn something from my actions and behaviors and try to change my behavior next time (if appropriate).

PROGRESS, NOT PERFECTION!

Jelma
04-11-2011, 03:37 PM
I really wish I would have taken measurements.

One bad meal doesn't have to turn into a bad day, a bad week, a bad month. That's how I ended up where I started.

Even if the scale doesn't move you are still making progress.

Lydia227
04-11-2011, 03:38 PM
That weight training would change my life and I would look far better 20lbs heavier with heavy lifting and cardio intervals. That focusing on gaining athletic strength, rather than weight loss, would bring better body composition results. And that healthier alternatives taste just as good.

Same here. :yes:

In addition...that I would feel much more satisfied with a snack that pared a good portion of real protein (already prepared and waiting in the fridge) with an appropriate carb.

And the question...does this food/behavior bring me closer or take me farther away from my goal?

serendipity907
04-11-2011, 04:12 PM
Since I really started dieting age 12, there was a tonne of things I didn't know. I wasn't even sure how many calories a person should be eating to maintain or lose weight. Not the best starting point for healthy habits :p

Mostly I just wish I'd known if you just eat roughly 2000 calories and remain active you'll be just fine.

berryblondeboys
04-11-2011, 04:38 PM
I wish I would have known not to fear the truth. I waited for YEARS to get my health checked on and in the meantime I developed high BP, high blood sugars and an under active thyroid. Now that I've faced the music, I am dealing with it and it is ever so much easier than I thought it would be. Giving up the carbs was so much easier than I ever thought it possible which to me is the biggest thing I would have known. I won't feel deprived without simple carbs!

supergir111
04-11-2011, 04:40 PM
Serving sizes are there for a reason, pasta is not meant to be consumed by the plate load
Losing weight is a marathon not a sprint
I can't go back to my old eating habits ever again...this is not a bad thing

eclipse
04-11-2011, 04:45 PM
I would tell myself that 1200 calories is nowhere near enough for someone who weighs almost 300 lb, no matter what the experts say.

I would tell myself not to worry about exercise. I know this is contrary to what others have said about things like weight training changing their lives, but I needed to focus on one thing. I also needed my health to get better before I could really focus on moving more.

I would tell myself to get on a good anti-depressant much, much sooner.

I would tell myself to just keep doing it. That's the most important part. Eat some birthday cake if you want some freaking birthday cake, but don't let it be the end of a good streak.

milmin2043
04-11-2011, 05:19 PM
Eat soup. It is very filling.

Exercise everyday.

Weight lifting makes you look so much better, regardless of weight.

I don't need to eat sugar. (I honestly thought I would feel so deprived if I didn't eat sugar, guess what? I don't).

Being hungry once in a while won't kill me.

doopdoop
04-11-2011, 05:23 PM
Tell myself: "Don't limit yourself, just because you are overweight. Losing weight will not magically change who you are, and it is better to adopt healthy thought patterns now so that you do not become overly dependent and obsessed with image."

JohnP
04-11-2011, 05:28 PM
I would have told my 30 year self to get started right away. I was working so many hours I couldn't find time to exercise. Little did I know exercise is not the key to weight loss. Calories are.