General chatter - Vermont, anyone? (travel)




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sacha
04-09-2011, 01:07 PM
Has anyone been to Vermont? Is it worth traveling to? We're about 45 minutes north of it and looking to plan a little summer vacation with our one year old. Ideas? Historical stuff? We don't know anything really about American history, are there any nice civil war monuments etc. to visit?

Thanks :)


geoblewis
04-09-2011, 01:25 PM
I'm from California. I flew out to Vermont during the winter for three weeks about four years ago to go to Green Mountain at Fox Run (http://www.fitwoman.com/), a women's fitness spa. I had the best time! Gorgeous! I went antiquing with other women, lots of site-seeing. The Vermont Country Store was fun. We went snowshoeing. There are a lot of trails around the area. Loved it! Want to go back!

sacha
04-09-2011, 01:29 PM
I'm from California. I flew out to Vermont during the winter for three weeks about four years ago to go to Green Mountain at Fox Run (http://www.fitwoman.com/), a women's fitness spa. I had the best time! Gorgeous! I went antiquing with other women, lots of site-seeing. The Vermont Country Store was fun. We went snowshoeing. There are a lot of trails around the area. Loved it! Want to go back!

That looks fantastic, maybe I'll have to leave hubby + baby behind!! :D :carrot: J/K but thank you!


zoodoo613
04-09-2011, 01:37 PM
I haven't spent a lot of time there, but Burlington is a nice city and Bennington is a nice town. The ferry across Lake Champlaine is fun, if you like that sort of thing. It's a pretty state.

dragonwoman64
04-09-2011, 02:52 PM
think Revolutionary War for Vermont. Is gorgeous.

Vladadog
04-09-2011, 04:57 PM
There was a confederate raid on Sheldon Vermont but that's the only civil war action that happened in the state. Mostly Vermont sent soldiers south (a VT regiment was important during the battle at Gettysburg, for example).

Vermont's a great place for hiking and camping. The state parks are clean and safe. Burlington and Montpelier are nice little cities. There are lovely B&Bs and inns all over the state. Pretty much, it depends a lot on what sort of things you'd like to do.

CyndiM
04-17-2011, 09:05 AM
I kind of think Vermont is a nice place to visit ;) I liked visiting so much I moved here.

One of my favorite Vermont things are the campgrounds. They have lean-tos which might be the greatest thing ever if you camp but don't like dealing with the weather.

As others have said - Revolutionary War stuff especially around Lake Champlain, lots of hiking, swimming, camping; great food, lovely inns. Personally we love the Bread and Puppet museum in Glover (I think), but that might not be everyone's thing.

ERHR
04-17-2011, 10:19 AM
I've only been to Burlington but while we were there we visited Shelburne Farms which we thought was SO COOL! It's a giant estate/working farm/educational facility. I learned a lot about the history of the area, agriculture, and gentlemen-farmers on the tour and it's just gorgeous - right up next to Lake Champlain. They also make cheddar and they have free samples as well as what you can buy and it was delicious.

SweetPeach3388
04-18-2011, 08:21 PM
I'm from New Hampshire, so I'm a bit partial to it, but Vermont is also gorgeous.

But if you really want history, you must come down to Boston. Look up the Freedom Trail.

VermontMom
04-18-2011, 10:13 PM
Oh I agree that visiting Shelburne Farms is a must! and you need a couple days (or even a week!) to see everything there.

I am also biased in thinking it is a beautiful state (well, once winter and slow spring are over :devil: ) Summer is gorgeous, with the Green Mountains. Lots of little lakes. Great, locally grown, organic food, lots of artisan cheeses, and Vermont has the highest percentage of microbreweries per capita in the U.S., I believe.

some history -


The Republic of Vermont

Vermont was an independent republic before joining the Union. Between 1777, when Vermont established its independence, and 1791, when Vermont joined the Union as the 14th state, Vermont was truly independent - with its own coins and its own postal service. French explorer Samuel de Champlain came to Vermont in 1609 guided by Algonquin Indians from Canada. He claimed northern Vermont for France. The French built the first fort in Vermont at Isle LaMotte and established other smaller settlements. When the British won the French and Indian War in 1763, the territory became part of what is now New England.

The first British settlement was at Fort Dummer (near Brattleboro), built as a defense against the French and their Indian allies. After the French and Indian War, the English began to settle the territory, which became known as the New Hampshire Grants, but was also claimed by New York.

Since both New York and New Hampshire claimed Vermont, many settlers who received land from the New Hampshire government found that other settlers were given the same land from the New York government. In 1775, the Green Mountain Boys formed to defend the New Hampshire land grants against the New Yorkers. Ethan Allen, one of Vermont's founders, led this army until the British captured him.

The Green Mountain Boys became famous for their role in the American Revolution at the battles of Hubbardton and Bennington in 1777. After these battles, the Green Mountain Boys returned home and declared Vermont an independent republic. In 1790, New York consented to the admission of Vermont into the Union (for a payment of $30,000) and stated the New York-Vermont boundary should be the mid-channel of Lake Champlain.

In 1791, fourteen years after declaring independence, Vermont became the 14th state, and the first state to join the Union after the original 13 colonies.

krampus
04-18-2011, 10:14 PM
Seconding recommendations for Burlington + Shelburne Farms! The grounds at Shelburne Farms are beautiful and it's interesting for all ages.

sacha
04-18-2011, 11:03 PM
Thanks everyone for all the great information!!!

saef
04-18-2011, 11:53 PM
I had a nice week in the Bennington area a few years back, staying at an inn in Dorset, VT, and what I remember best were the Park McCullough house, a Victorian mansion; Hildene, which was Lincoln's son's house; the Bennington Museum, since I'm interested in antique pottery; and outlet store shopping near a kind of circle in Manchester. I also made some Robert Frost-related pilgrimages. The cemetery in which Frost is buried is a handsome early 19th churchyard place, with a really great church that has a really gorgeous white picket fence. (Seriously -- this fence is in my dreams -- it is so very elegant, with an urn-shape finials. You can see it here: http://www.oldfirstchurchbenn.org/) Also I was interested in the American folk painter Grandma Moses at the time, and she is featured in the Bennington Museum. Anyway, I recommend a visit there. I went there in foliage season during the first week of October & I still remember the huge pumpkin-colored maple leaves everywhere underfoot.