Vegetarian, Vegan & Raw/Living food recipes - The Simplest Bean Burgers




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Kateryna
02-20-2011, 09:08 PM
From: How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Simple Meatless Recipes for Great Food by Mark Bittman

Tried it and tastes SOOOO good!

I calculated all calories and this is the breakdown:
Per 100g (about 2 medium patties):
Cal - 175
Fat - 6
Carb - 23
Fiber-4
Sugar - 2
Protein - 7

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2 cups (400g) well-cooked white, black, or red beans or chickpeas or lentils, or one 14-ounce can, drained

1 medium onion, quartered

1/2 cup (50g) rolled oats (preferably not instant)

1 tablespoon chili powder or spice mix of your choice

1 egg ------ (or bean-cooking liquid, stock, or other liquid (wine, cream, milk, water, ketchup, etc.) if necessary

2 Tbsp Oil

Salt and pepper


Combine the beans, onion, oats, chili powder, salt, pepper, and egg in a food processor and pulse until chunky but not puréed.

Let the mixture rest for a few minutes if time allows.

With wet hands, shape into whatever size patties you want and again let rest for a few minutes if time allows. (You can make the burger mixture or even shape the burgers up to a day or so in advance. Just cover tightly and refrigerate, then bring everything back to room temperature before cooking.)

Film the bottom of a large nonstick or well-seasoned cast-iron skillet with oil and turn the heat to medium. A minute later, add the patties.

Cook until nicely browned on one side, about 5 minutes; turn carefully and cook on the other side until firm and browned.


May be frozen up to 3 months

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Simplest Vegan Bean Burger

Many options: Omit the egg, obviously. Add 1/2 cup Mashed Potatoes; or 1/2 cup cooked oatmeal or short-grain rice (white or brown); or 1/4 cup miso or 1/2 cup tofu. Bean-and-Cheese Burger. As a flavor-adder, cheese can't be beat, plus there are two bonuses: You don't have to mess with melting cheese on top of the burger, and-for the most part-it acts as a binder. Add 1/2 to 1 cup grated Parmesan, cheddar, Swiss, Jack, mozzarella, or other cheese to the mix (you can omit the egg if you like).

Bean-and-Spinach Burger.

Of all the veggies you can add to a burger, I like spinach. You can leave it uncooked and just shred it if you prefer (figure about 2 cups), but this gives better results; it's great with a little garlic added: Squeeze dry and chop about 1 cup cooked spinach (you'll need about 8 ounces of raw spinach to start, or you can use frozen spinach); add it to the mix and proceed with the recipe.

Bean-and-Veggie Burger.

Many options, but don't overdo it or the burger will fall apart: Add up to 1/2 cup carrots, bell peppers, shallots, leeks, celery, potato, sweet potato, winter squash, zucchini, or a combination. Cut into chunks as you do the onion and grind with the beans or shred or mince and add afterward.

High-Protein Bean Burger.

The soy gives it just a little boost: Instead of rolled oats, use rolled soy (soy flakes).


Suzanne 3FC
02-21-2011, 07:27 AM
It sounds delicious! I like the variations :)

Quail
02-22-2011, 03:53 PM
These are great! Thanks. Going to give one a try tonight.


guynna
04-17-2011, 12:53 PM
I just made these (am eating them NOW) and they are really good. I used eggbeaters + spinach, garlic and chili powder. YUMMMMM!

JenMusic
04-17-2011, 01:12 PM
I'm not a vegetarian, but I love good black bean burgers. Thanks for sharing!

Theyda
04-18-2011, 04:49 AM
Well I know what I'm cooking for tea tomorrow, better find the spinach :carrot:

JEN3
04-29-2011, 09:49 PM
Thanks for the recipe I've been looking for meat alternative recipes. I'm not a vegetarian but wish I was. I don't eat much meat and never have I realize how bad it really is for you.

Esofia
06-18-2011, 04:15 PM
That does sound enticing, and the variations look pretty snazzy too. I wonder how it would be with quinoa flakes instead of rolled oats?

How do you reheat it after freezing? Has anyone tried brushing the burgers with a little oil and baking them, possibly after freezing instead of before? I find it can be hard to cook this sort of thing all the way through when you're frying it in a pan, plus they can soak up oil alarmingly.

You mentioned that 100g is two patties: how many patties did you get out of the mix?

Any comments on how the flavour/texture changes with different beans? Am I right in thinking that 2 cups of cooked beans is about 2/3 cup dried? I've just put a cup of cannellini beans on to soak for making a dip tomorrow, and I think that'll keep me busy for the time being, but I'm quite keen to try this when I'm in the mood for more cooking.

You might want to edit the post, by the way. Cheese is currently listed under the vegan variations, plus I seriously doubt tht 1/4 cup miso would be a good addition. That's a large amount of miso, it would add huge amounts of salt, and it's listed along with binders although I've never heard of miso being added as a binder. Nutritional yeast can be good to add as a fake-cheesy vegan flavouring, and it's high in protein and B vitamins.

Real vegan binding agents: powdered egg replacer, obviously, and there are various favourites out there. I'm trying to remember what I've used in nut cutlets. Gram (chickpea/garbanzo bean) flour is pretty useful stuff, and very high in protein, though you don't want to overdo it as the flavour is quite strong in large quantities. There are other popular vegan binding agents listed on the internet, though I can't stand the taste of flax seed or bananas in things and am perfectly happy with egg replacers and the like myself.

Which has suddenly made me think: what would an Indian version of this bean burger be like, with garlic and ginger and spices? Or Mexican? I have some dried black beans which I've never been quite sure what to do with. Ooh, sweetcorn could be good in there, in that case. I wonder if I have any in stock?

Serval87
06-29-2012, 05:02 AM
Could you use milled flax seeds instead to help bind it?