100 lb. Club - When you first started.. did you exercise?




Catcuffling
02-12-2011, 06:49 AM
hi guys when you frist started your weight loss journey did you exercise right away or did you just try and sort out your food first? I'm really struggling this time around, like REALLY struggling. I feel like maybe if i just focus on teh food first, and then exercise a bit after? will i still lose weight?:?: i'm thinking of doing shakes as well. i can't get out of this food binge thing i do..


Celyia
02-12-2011, 07:07 AM
I started the with the food first and slowly added exercise. I made the commitment to do 5 minutes of exercise a day - be it walking, cycling, or whatnot - with the intention of making this into a habit. As time has gone on, I've added more time (in blocks of 5 min), so now I find that I feel antsy and uncomfortable if I don't get exercise in.

Now, mind you, I won't lose as fast as I could, the thing is I was resisting the idea of exercise so much that it was killing any sort of motivation to get healthier. I found that doing this really helped me out a lot. Hope this helps.

joyfulloser
02-12-2011, 07:20 AM
Food first...added exercise 3 weeks later.:)


carrie77
02-12-2011, 08:06 AM
I'm different. I seem to have a hard time sticking to healthy eating when I'm not exercising. As soon as I start to exercise the eating seems to fall into line much better. Exercise is a natural anti-depressent, it lifts my spirits and motivates me. After I have a great sweaty workout it makes it that much harder to sit down and binge on junk food - I don't want to ruin all the hard work I just did!

sept15lija
02-12-2011, 08:15 AM
I started out with eating first. I also worked on moving more, and so added extra calorie burning that way, but no "gotta go to the gym and do an hour of cardio" stuff. Just in the last few weeks (I've been losing since late June) am I working on really getting more exercise in. If you're really struggling, I would work on food and not worry about exercise yet.

Asherdoodles87
02-12-2011, 08:16 AM
I started with diet and exercise the same day. At first the exercise was really hard, I can remember only being able to do 10 minutes of walking on the treadmill.

You should still lose without exercise as long as you still have a deficit in calories.

Shmead
02-12-2011, 08:23 AM
I did food first, worked in exercise a month or so in. Exercised for VERY brief (like 5 minute) sessions--early on, it was more about forming the habit and learning not to hate it than actual effective calorie burn.

I think you have the best attitude. So many people use "I just don't have time to exercise" as an excuse to eat whatever they want, as if not exercising makes dieting pointless.

envelope
02-12-2011, 08:31 AM
When I am exercising I seem to have better control over what I am eating. If I am thinking of eating a piece of cake, I think is it really worth the 30 min of time I put in on the elyptical. Sometimes it is, and sometimes I take a bite and it is an ok cake, but not fabulous, so I stop eating right there. It is amazing...in the past I would eat it no matter what.

Eliana
02-12-2011, 08:39 AM
I focused on diet for three months and lost 30 pounds the first two months. My loss slowed significantly after that. Once I added exercise, the scale slowed dramatically but the inches flew off. ;) That's really important.

You mentioned shakes. I started with easy counting calories using Slim Fast, Lean Cuisines and protein bars. I found after a while I was lethargic and constipated. In switching to a more whole foods life style those problems went away.

I tell you all that so you know that it's ok to start wherever you are!! I think most of us started in a place very different from where we end up. Your lifestyle is going to change just a little bit with each pound lost and it's amazing and if you take it slowly, it's also quite enjoyable. If I had jumped in as I am now, I would have kicked and screamed and failed. As it is, I couldn't be happier with all the changes I have implemented and it has been easy. I tended to change out one food every month. So one month I took out Slim Fast and experimented with steel cut oats and eggs. Another month I took out the Lean Cuisines and experimented with making my own versions.

Jonesie
02-12-2011, 08:41 AM
I started both the same day and boy was the exercise hard. I could barely walk a half mile in 25 minutes and was dying when I got home from it. Now I run 2 miles a day. I feel like eating healthy is easier (its never easy but you know what I mean) if I can say to myself... "You dont want to 'waste' 30 Day Shred!" :lol:

mj5
02-12-2011, 08:46 AM
I started with both. I am much more likely to stick to making healthy choices when I am working out (don't want to "waste" a good workout). I have noticed, that when one starts to slip, so does the other.

I started slow w/ exercise and gradally increased it. Now I am going to the gym 3-4 times a week and taking 2 zumba classes a week, which I LOVE.

You have to find the balance that works best for you. You can do it!!!

quantumsheep
02-12-2011, 09:14 AM
I started with the exercise, and I'm still trying to figure out what the best food choices are for me, since I'm either doing calorie counting wrong or it's not working. I started with exercise, because I feel better when I exercise. I sleep better. I like myself better. I have more energy.

I know that a lot of people start slowly, but I've always been an all or nothing kind of girl, so I started with P90X. It's kicking my ***. My whole body is sore. Laughing hurts. Walking hurts. Raising my arms above my head hurts. The great thing, for me, about this level of exercise is that I'm ready to collapse after I've worked out for the 1h 15m it takes to complete a program, but 15m later, I want to get up and do it again.

I may try the P90X food plan next, since I like the exercise so much. It's just so difficult buying that variety of fresh food when one is cooking and shopping for one.

Heather
02-12-2011, 09:17 AM
I started with food first, and then worked in the exercise later. I was too overwhelmed to do it all at once.

JessLess
02-12-2011, 09:57 AM
I started with the exercise and after over six months with no weight loss, but feeling a lot better, I cut portion sizes, carbs and fat.

starfishkitty
02-12-2011, 10:02 AM
Honestly, I did food first. The first 30 to 40lbs I lost without much gym going... though as pounds came off I became more active naturally!

Jen516
02-12-2011, 10:38 AM
Food first, for 7 months, with a few bouts of walking/jogging here and there. Sixty pounds later, I'm now feeling like I can tackle the exercise thing. My Feb goal is to walk a mile every day. I know that exercise is crucial to my end goal, which is being healthy!

ShesLosingIt
02-12-2011, 10:53 AM
I started with the exercise, and I'm still trying to figure out what the best food choices are for me

Same here.

I started walking the dog every day back in March or so for about a mile then I'd add a mile or two every week then I'd alternate walking with jogging and then bought myself a recumbent bike in November. I didn't start seriously focusing on my diet and cutting carbs until late August. I knew that with the amount of weight I had/have to lose, I NEED to exercise to keep up my muscle tone and skin elasticity. I also totally agree with the feeling better part - everything got better after I started exercising but before I changed my diet - my attitude, my sleep patterns, my cholesterol and, yes, my weight.

I'm also one of those people that doesn't calorie count so if I indulge in a little extra (homemade LC ice cream, a bit too much cheese, a small carb laden item at an event) something, I don't obsess over it - I just add an extra 20 or 30 minutes on to my workout and figure it'll wash out in the end.

DixC Chix
02-12-2011, 10:53 AM
I started with exercise while I tracked my food and got an idea of what I was doing. The action of just tallying up what I was eating made me more aware but I was still not very accountable. I lost 10# with the exercise and food awareness over 3 months. I decided to get 'real' with it March 1, 2010 and joined WW on line. More accountability and tracking weight loss success. And I had established the habit (and friendships) of going to the gym. I added 3FC for a more consistent source of support rather than family and friends.

carter
02-12-2011, 11:15 AM
I happened to start with exercise this time too - though, in my previous weight loss attempts I had started with food. But this whole process for me started when a beautiful woman I was very keen on said "You do exercise, don't you?" and all I could do in response was stammer. ;)

I think you can lose weight with controlling your eating only, but exercise makes it go a little faster, helps you preserve muscle mass as you lose fat, and has all kinds of other benefits that people have noted.

But: in my experience it takes a few weeks to a month of regular exercise to start seeing those benefits, and there is a long difficult adjustment period to push through. When you take up an exercise plan (or intensify your existing plan) you will start retaining water and see bounces on the scale. You will be more tired instead of more energetic. And you will be more hungry, and tempted to eat more. This is what happens to me every time I adjust my exercise plan - it takes a few weeks to push through it and then it all evens out - the bounces level out, the hunger subsides, the little energy boost actually comes.

Also: in a weird way exercising helps me avoid temptation in eating. I often catch myself thinking "come on, you don't want to waste that whole workout you did by eating back the calories, do you?" :dizzy:

Pacifica Bee
02-12-2011, 11:17 AM
I didn't do any exercise for the first year. I added in walks/jogs just 2 months ago.

AZ Sunrises
02-12-2011, 11:32 AM
I don't have a gym membership, but I endeavor to spend at least an hour a day walking at a decent pace. Yesterday it was almost two hours.

I find that I spaz much less if I have a few extra calories. Okay...over by 200 calories. Walk an extra hour. I don't view it as a punishment for having extra. It's a tool that *allows* me to have a few extras here and there that I'd otherwise not allow.

lottie63
02-12-2011, 11:47 AM
food first, added exercise about a month in.

sick_n_tired
02-12-2011, 12:11 PM
A month ago, I could only do 10 min. on the elliptical at a 12 minute mile pace. And I thought I was going to die.

In the space of just one month, I'm up to doing 30+ minutes at a 8.5 minute mile pace.

So yes ... I did start exercising at the beginning. I will never be a person who loves to exercise - when I want to quit (usually, every day in the middle of exercising) I think of how much I want all this fat off of me. It's usually enough to keep me going.

thelast20
02-12-2011, 12:22 PM
I basically do both together and find that I may loose more inches than lbs. on the scale. Exercise is pretty much a reward for me..from everyday life stresses. Good Luck.

pamatga
02-12-2011, 12:44 PM
I happened to start with exercise this time too - though, in my previous weight loss attempts I had started with food. But this whole process for me started when a beautiful woman I was very keen on said "You do exercise, don't you?" and all I could do in response was stammer. ;)

I think you can lose weight with controlling your eating only, but exercise makes it go a little faster, helps you preserve muscle mass as you lose fat, and has all kinds of other benefits that people have noted.

But: in my experience it takes a few weeks to a month of regular exercise to start seeing those benefits, and there is a long difficult adjustment period to push through. When you take up an exercise plan (or intensify your existing plan) you will start retaining water and see bounces on the scale. You will be more tired instead of more energetic. And you will be more hungry, and tempted to eat more. This is what happens to me every time I adjust my exercise plan - it takes a few weeks to push through it and then it all evens out - the bounces level out, the hunger subsides, the little energy boost actually comes.

Also: in a weird way exercising helps me avoid temptation in eating. I often catch myself thinking "come on, you don't want to waste that whole workout you did by eating back the calories, do you?" :dizzy:

Carter You summarized it up so wonderfully.:cp:

I just wanted to add to what you said is: to those people who have never exercised don't feel like you have to do a whole routine of anything first or tenth time out. After a couple of years of being totally inactive, due to arthritis, I really had to start out by being able to tolerate standing on my feet for 10 minutes at a time and move from there. If I hadn't had to work through injuries in the past, I think that I would have quit right then and there because that is a discouraging place to be but I knew my body well enough to just be patient and accept the baby steps that I was taking.
Now, I am walking 3 10 minutes sessions each day Monday-Friday (I have to break it down because of chronic pain) and I plan on increasing it to 4 10 minutes sesssions this coming week.

Another thing I added is I now wear a pedometer. It is really neat and it actually is an incentive for moving in general. Even if it's at a snail's pace. :snail: I also recommend going on Livestrong.com and finding out how every day chores do burn calories and just how much. Now, I "fight" my husband to load the dishwasher and doing laundry! :soap:That's a first. I'm now in the "business" of looking for ways to burn calories. Every little bit helps! :dancer:

reptogirl
02-12-2011, 12:50 PM
i am focusing more on my food, if i get 10 mins of exercise in a day, i feel like i have done my exercise for the day, of course i am in my first month of my journey, and as i lose more weight i will gain more energy and then can do more, i try to do something like 20 or 30 mins of zumba a week, i am looking forward to the day where i want to exercise, once this weather warms up, i am going to start some sort of walking, even if its just a block or two at a time.

Jasmine31
02-12-2011, 12:52 PM
Build your walking up. Make it a habit first. Take some b vitamins.

alsten02
02-12-2011, 01:38 PM
definitely food first.. it feels too overwhelming trying to juggle both especially since i have problems with binging etc if i feel i cant get all my workout in ill start to feel awful then cave into eating. .. the odd day though if im feelin good enough and wanting to ill get 15-25 min in of dancing/wii etc .. im feeling better physically just in changing my food habits, so i know in time slowly ill be getting more in :)

Dusti
02-12-2011, 01:57 PM
I am still sorting out my food and have yet to exercise but I know I will add it later. As I lose more weight I am discovering some foods that my body can't handle that I never noticed before. It's all a learning experience I guess. :)

Laffalot
02-12-2011, 02:03 PM
Morning All :) I started with food first for the first week or two & then have added aquafit at least 2X a week & when I can, 3X. It's really icy out so I don't walk outside - that will come with the thaw (Not too soon for me either! :lol:) I am going to weight Watchers as I feel that is the most healthy, balanced program. Do I fall off the wagon - for sure - but not like I used to. I'm losing very slowly (which is me) but I will reach my big goal. I'm setting little goals now as it is too overwhelming for me to look at the big one. So hang in there - we are all here to support you & each other. :wave:

Trazey34
02-12-2011, 02:08 PM
every OTHER time i'd tried to lose weight it followed the same pattern - restrict everything good and exercise 5 days a week -- this time i went with the old saying that you're fool if you do the same thing over and over again and expect a different result -- that result being frustrated at not being able to do all i want right away, and quitting!

So this time I got my food under control, did a bit of therapy to get my head under control, and finally broke down the silly FEAR i had about exercise. It won't kill me, I don't have to love it, just like laundry and housework and washing windows - i don't have to love it, i just have to do it!!

I started with Walk Away the Pounds vids and could get thru 10 minutes before wanting to pass out - but did another 5 because i think you need to push yourself a BIT, and it got better and better and better!

sabrinalecompte
02-12-2011, 02:17 PM
I am one of those people who never really knows just how to adjust my diet without feeling completely deprived, so for me, the exercising just made sense. I had been sedentary for so long that I knew I needed to get up and get moving to motivate myself. It has been hard, but I truly believe it has made all the difference this time, that I got off my butt and forced myself to move every single day. Making BETTER food choices, rather than dieting, has been easier now that I'm excercising every day.

When I started, I just promised myself I would avoid binging on bad stuff, take one less scoop of the food I eat (because I know I over eat) and I would move every day. It felt like a decent compromise. As time has gone on, it's easier to eat less overall, make better food decisions overall, and the moving every day keeps motivating me to work harder.

Had I chosen to do one at a time, I think it would have been a lot easier to backslide into my bad habits.

BigBlueStar
02-12-2011, 02:23 PM
I started with food but tried to be conscious to add movement whenever possible, but not necessarily 'exercise'.

I'm 5 1/2 weeks solid with a 14 lb loss, which I am happy about but ready to see iches go too, so I recently got paperwork for a gym mebership and loaded my Netflix Que with fitness DVDs.

Last time I was serious about weight loss (2 years ago), I lost by eating an incredibly strict diet - it was all I could do to just focus on what I was supposed to be eating, I walked occasionally but did not incorporate any other activity. I lost 30 pounds and I felt great but didn't actually LOOK any different. SO, lesson learned. I KNOW I have to focus on working out as much as food, but I'm glad I took at least a few weeks to just get into the routine of planning, preparing and counting.

Lauren201
02-12-2011, 04:01 PM
It was both for me. After a few years of not working out and eating total crap, one morning I woke up and I was over it. That day I got up went to the gym at my apartment complex and vowed to eat better and stop drinking soda. I was consuming a 6 pack + a day of dr. pepper. I slowly weened myself off the soda and added fruits and veggies to my diet. Then I cut out fast food. Then I added whole grains instead of plain white bread. Then I started regularly eating breakfast. It's a process. I workout 5-6 days a week, working out keeps me motivated to eat healthy because if I workout and don't eat healthy the workout is wasted (in my opinion). So putting two and two together really helped me.

kaplods
02-12-2011, 04:36 PM
When I started, I was in extremely poor health. I had applied for disability because I was unable to work because of the symptoms (mostly because I couldn't stay awake or concentrate on any task for more than a few minutes at a time. I'd get distracted and fall asleep at my desk - almost narcoleptic. Reading emails at my desk, a task that would take 5 minutes only months earlier, would take more than an hour, because the information wasn't sinking in. I'd have to read an email three or four times to absorb it's meaning).

You could say that I started with both diet and exercise, but you could also say that I started with neither, because my first changes were so small.

If you define dieting as eating less or eating better, and exercise as moving more - then I did both. But most people wouldn't consider my changes to have been large enough to call either. Stretching during a commercial, trying to walk a few steps further than I had before (I bought a step counting pedometer, and every day wrote down the number of steps at the end of the day).

Initially, weight loss wasn't my primary goal. I knew I'd failed so many times in the past, that I wasn't confident that I could make big changes, so I made small ones. I made changes I was willing to stick with forever whether or not it resulted in weight loss. I was pretty pessimistic about my ability to lose weight, but I thought with every pound that I could at least keep off whatever I had lost and maybe "just one more." For me, the specific health improvements I needed were more important than weight loss itself. I knew that finding a way to prevent giving up was more important than the specific weight loss. For the first two years I lost no weight, but I did make amazing health improvements. If I had been only concerned with weight, I would have given up and wouldn't have seen those improvements. Ironically, taking weight loss off the "first priority" table, I've been able to lose more than I ever did dieting to lose weight. Weight loss was the reward, not the goal. And weight loss wasn't the only reward (in fact, it's been the least important one. Losing almost 90 lbs is an amazing acheivement for me. I've never lost so much, or continued losing so long, but it doesn't impress me nearly as much as the other changes, the improvement in strength, stamina and immune function, and the decrease in pain, fatigue, and asthma attacks).

It's been slower weight loss, but much happier weight loss.

I am at the point that I have to diet, rather than just make small changes. And I focus more on diet than exercise, but I don't really call exercise "exercise," I call it "play." I do find ways to play more.

I love swimming and water exercise, but I need to use the warm water therapy pool. In the winter I don't go as often, as I have more health issues in the winter.

I love animals, and hate walking with no purpose, so in the past (even before this current weight loss attempt) I have volunteered as a dog-walker (Since my balance has worsened, and since a bad experience with walking a dog too strong for me to control, I've hesitated to go back, even though I know I could choose only to walk the tiny dogs. This spring, when there's no snow on the ground, I want to go back).

I love my stability ball. I don't really "exercise" on it. I sit on it. Sometimes I put on my headphones and sway back and forth on it to the music. It doesn't feel like exercise. I'll even use it while I'm at the computer (not today, because I'm having a pain flare, and I lack the balance. I don't want to fall on my butt, so I'll save it for a day I have better balance).

The first time I used the stability ball, sitting on it was so fun, I watched tv on it for about two hours. I could barely walk the next day. I was using calf and thigh muscles without realizing it.


I know I've rambled as usual, but I think that there are so many different ways and places to start that it's interesting and all to hear where everyone else started, but in the scheme of things it doesn't matter where you start as long as you start and keep going. Whatever you need to do to keep doing, that's what you need to do.

alyssarof2012
02-12-2011, 04:57 PM
I jumped right in and started exercising and trying to eat healthy all at once. Now I realize I probably took on too much, because I have major food setbacks often. I'd say sort out your food first and not focus so much on exercise. Maybe exercise about 20-30 minutes 3 days a week to start out, but put most your effort into planning your meals and snacks. My biggest issue is snacking.

toastedsmoke
02-12-2011, 05:33 PM
In the past, I always started with diet first and then later tried to add in exercise (because it's not my favourite thing to get moving). I always did okay with the weightloss part without exercise, but usually at about 3-4 months of being on plan, I'd get bored and fall of the calorie-counting and exercising bandwagon.

I'm currently on-plan for the longest consistent period I've ever been i.e. 7months. And I can say the difference this time has been EXERCISE! I haven't lost weight as fast, but I've lost inches faster, but that's not even the point. What I did was, I started watching my portions, whilst eating the same things, but not necessary calorie counting. Then I started exercising with a goal-oriented program. I did C25k and 30 Day Shred at the same time, both of which were time-bound programs. So I told myself, as long as I finished them, I never had to do any exercise again. I did C25K on a treadmill and I found it HARD!!! But after the 20-30 minute workout, I'd look at the calorie burned value on the treadmill and it'd be like I'd burned like 150 calories or something... and everyone knows that workout machines tend to give overly generous estimates. I could have cried!

Anyway, the point I'm trying to make is that exercise has kept me on plan. It has given me a whole new perspective on what a calorie is and what it takes to burn one and has definitely made me more sensitive to what goes into my mouth. If I'm tempted to have 2 servings of a treat, it definitely makes me put one back down, or makes me think of how that will affect my plans for dinner etc. Exercise has made me stricter with myself and sticking to plan. For me, if I can be on plan with exercise, it's usually easier for me to stay on plan with food.

Catcuffling
02-12-2011, 05:46 PM
Thanks for the replies guys! it's really helped me a lot. i guess i'll just take it as it comes and try not to get so disheartened so easily lol. I love aqua aerobics but we don't have it up here (i've moved) I think i'll get myself an Exercycle and start on that (with my hip problems and all)

I like how a couple of you said that you started with just the food first and as you lost weight you just moved more, which really does make sense. Being this big is trying at the best of times lol

I'll get there! i'm really happy i found this forum as well. Such great advice and support.

shannonmb
02-12-2011, 08:22 PM
You can add me to the "sort out the food first" camp. I was about 3 months and 30 lbs in before I started a very mild walking program. Just at the beginning of January (8 months in) have I now started really amping up my exercise, and it was because I was feeling so much better without as much extra weight and was actually ready for a challenge. I am already feeling GREAT about the exercising, it has become almost like an anti-anxiety drug for me. I literally feel like I'm burning off excess nervous energy (which I tend to have a lot of). I'm loving it, but I do think it's because I took my time working up to it and didn't pressure myself. Doing it because I WANT to!

Smiling_Sara
02-12-2011, 09:05 PM
hi guys when you frist started your weight loss journey did you exercise right away or did you just try and sort out your food first? I'm really struggling this time around, like REALLY struggling. I feel like maybe if i just focus on teh food first, and then exercise a bit after? will i still lose weight?:?: i'm thinking of doing shakes as well. i can't get out of this food binge thing i do..


I did exercise at my known heaviest ( 278 ) and it was HARD. I went about 2.5 miles on the treadmill, and I've worked my way up since then. I am now addicted to exercise. I need physical movement daily or I start to feel sluggish if I miss a day.

Dayna320
02-12-2011, 11:37 PM
I'm not very far along. But I've made a million false starts. And with most of those I tried to do exercise and food from the brining. The thing was that I found when I would skip out on workouts ( which would start to happen after a week or two, with out fail) I started eating worse too. I think I felt like 'well I didn't work out I might as well binge, today is already a failure' kind of the opposite of what everyone else has been saying about not wanting their work outs to go to wast. I have a very negative all or nothing streak. So this time I thought I should seperate the two. Try to get out of that mindset. Make eating healthy a habit so that when I do start to incorporate exercise, and I miss a work out, which I inevitably will, it won't throw me off completely. so I guess what I'm getting at is if you think it'll be beneficial for you to start with food. Then go for it.

WhitePicketFences
02-13-2011, 10:26 AM
I didn't do 'real' (moderate or heavy, scheduled) cardio for the first 5-6 months, actually. My weight loss was steady, great, and I concentrated on my new food restriction. I did cut my calories quite militantly, but if you have a lot to lose, enough to be feeling like you are in the 100 lb club, then you should see steady loss without exercise -- for now. I did try to move more, walk, introduce "floor exercises" (pushups, etc), even dance during the first half-year. For tone and to get fit for real exercise. Besides the reasons everyone listed for not exercising at first, I suppose I was also was intimidated by the gym and wanted results before I invested in a $200 piece of home equipment.

At 50 lbs down I celebrated with a re-vamping of what I was doing, and a re-commitment to the next 6 months (this was probably also the time I got it in my head that I'd lose 100 in exactly a year...). I bought an exercise bike and started a moderate-to-heavy routine 6 days/week. I also joined 3fc then. A few months later, I bought hand weights.

Now I can't live without exercise, but I think I did what I had to do, for me. If I had change something, I think I could've gotten the weights sooner, actually. The weights were 3fc's influence.

I also was all about the math and the weight losss results as my primary goal, so even though I cared about other aspects of health, they were more slowly introduced. My foods changed. I stopped eating WW yogurts and low-fat snack packs and now crave spinach, greek yogurt, beans ...

When people extol the virtues of exercise re: weight loss and health, I couldn't agree more. And I came to exercise a lot. I still do. But sometimes I really feel our culture overemphasizes exercise to those who are just starting out and have a lot to lose.

I have seen people who have a lot to lose tie it up in one big bow and then lag on food when they miss workouts. Conversely, I know that it's easy to overestimate one's caloric burn and thus overeat.

I'm not talking about on these boards so much -- would have to stop and evaluate that one -- more, in my own family. If you want to master the food intake first ... then I think that's perfectly okay. You should want to move a lot and be overall as healthy as you can right now, but you don't want to burn a couple hundred calories a day at the expense of a greater eating deficit.