General Diet Plans and Questions - Issues with Jillian michaels master your metabolism




helwa588
02-10-2011, 06:26 PM
Im currently listening to the audiobook and I'm a finding it kind of doomsday like. She has brought up some good points about additives in food and all. But I feel like everything is bad. She even goes into how ingredients in shampoo and make up can make you fat. I think that's a bit much.

Shes also against sythenic hormones( which she is totally entitled to not use) like bcp and she says she controls her pcos and endometris through diet and exercise. That's nice she keeps her hormone problems under control but for some of us diet and excercise isn't enough and need a hormone medication assistance.

I understand organic is better but not all of us can afford organic meat and veggies.


Am I the only who thinks her approach is a little extreme?


Nola Celeste
02-10-2011, 07:12 PM
I find most extreme approaches too extreme for my tastes, too.

Organic foods can have their own problems, and they are no more nutritious than conventionally raised foods (there may be other good reasons to support organic farming, but nutrition is not one of them). As for "natural" cosmetics, that term is quite literally meaningless--the FDA doesn't even bother to define the term, so it can go on any pretty much any bottle of chemical sludge manufacturers choose.

"Extraordinary claims demand extraordinary proof." I find it extraordinary that anyone would believe that shampoo and other topically-applied cosmetics could add weight. If these substances penetrated skin, they'd be classed as drugs, not cosmetic products. It's vastly more likely that the Dove bar I ate, not the Dove bar I washed with, made me fat.

I agree that there's a fine line between someone saying, "I control health issue X with food and exercise alone" and saying, "Everyone should control health issue X with food and exercise alone." It's something to aim for and good for those who can manage it--but I hope that doesn't slide into casting aspersions on people who still need the boost of medication to correct a medical concern. (They would have to pry my levothyroxine from my cold, dead hands.)

When it all comes down to it, people in the public eye often go extreme in their statements because they A) don't live in a world in which choosing betweeen a food bill and a doctor's visit is a real concern, B) spend less than a fraction of a percent of their income on food at all and don't recognize that most of us will opt for the six-dollar chicken over the twelve-dollar chicken, and C) have a product to sell.

You can't sell well if you aren't L-o-o-o-u-u-u-d!! so celebrities tend to quack a lot. :D

carolr3639
02-10-2011, 07:44 PM
I find most extreme approaches too extreme for my tastes, too.

Organic foods can have their own problems, and they are no more nutritious than conventionally raised foods (there may be other good reasons to support organic farming, but nutrition is not one of them). As for "natural" cosmetics, that term is quite literally meaningless--the FDA doesn't even bother to define the term, so it can go on any pretty much any bottle of chemical sludge manufacturers choose.

"Extraordinary claims demand extraordinary proof." I find it extraordinary that anyone would believe that shampoo and other topically-applied cosmetics could add weight. If these substances penetrated skin, they'd be classed as drugs, not cosmetic products. It's vastly more likely that the Dove bar I ate, not the Dove bar I washed with, made me fat.

I agree that there's a fine line between someone saying, "I control health issue X with food and exercise alone" and saying, "Everyone should control health issue X with food and exercise alone." It's something to aim for and good for those who can manage it--but I hope that doesn't slide into casting aspersions on people who still need the boost of medication to correct a medical concern. (They would have to pry my levothyroxine from my cold, dead hands.)

When it all comes down to it, people in the public eye often go extreme in their statements because they A) don't live in a world in which choosing betweeen a food bill and a doctor's visit is a real concern, B) spend less than a fraction of a percent of their income on food at all and don't recognize that most of us will opt for the six-dollar chicken over the twelve-dollar chicken, and C) have a product to sell.

You can't sell well if you aren't L-o-o-o-u-u-u-d!! so celebrities tend to quack a lot. :D

Agreed.


Suzanne 3FC
02-10-2011, 07:52 PM
She even goes into how ingredients in shampoo and make up can make you fat. I think that's a bit much.


Oh holy cow :faint:

That sounds like the type of quackery made famous by K Trudeau in his weight loss conspiracy book. He made those same claims.

I've not read the book in question, haven't even browsed it. But I'm very disappointed if this is the type of advice it contains.

The K Trudeau book included just enough proven facts to make you think that everything else must be true as well - even if it was proven hogwash. So your comment about some of the advice in this book being good but questioning the rest makes me wonder if perhaps the book should go back on the shelf?

Eat less, move more. :goodscale:

sweetea
02-13-2011, 02:16 PM
I'm really glad you had the courage to bring this up, considering everyone these days is a Jillian fan. I am not. I was reading the book full, by Dr. Snyder, the one who invented those "full bars." He gave the inside scoop on the Biggest Loser; how the trainers dehydrate contestants terribly and get the contestants to do other (in my mind unethical/dishonest, whatever you want to call it) things to have extremely rapid, UNHEALTHY weight loss. All in the name of show ratings. Dr. Snyder said many gain their weight back, once they collect their money, and it's over and done. I cannot support any "expert" who condones and participates in that.

Besides, the only credential she has is that of a certified fitness trainer, which I understand is not rocket science. She's not a doctor, nutritionist or registered dietician. She pushes her own brand of "herbal diet pills." The Times called her a quack and she threatened to sue them back in 2010. They retracted their statement and said she does have a fitness certification. Woopee.

I would no more take advice from her about eating and health than I would from a stranger on the street.

Shame on everyone for elevating her into a guru.

LightRaven
02-13-2011, 09:39 PM
Besides, the only credential she has is that of a certified fitness trainer, which I understand is not rocket science.


Nope, it's not. One of my co-workers just got certified as an aerobics instructor. She's not the sharpest tool in the shed. (Nor is she the thinnest. I was always confused.... she's got maybe 30lbs extra on her... as wrong as it is... I'm pretty sure that if you walk into a gym looking for a job as an aerobics instructor, and you are 30 lbs overweight- I'm pretty sure you aren't going to get the job.... not that that is exactly PC, but... I dunno.. ANYWAYS)

I've never really been a fan of Jillian's.. Don't love her, don't hate her.. she's just not on my radar. Guess I wasn't missing out on much :)

LR

Nola Celeste
02-14-2011, 12:24 AM
I am sooo not a fan of Jillian Michaels. To me, she's the archetype of every "mean girl" I ever encountered in life all rolled together and dipped in a greasy layer of holier-than-thou smugness. It baffles me why a woman who clearly dislikes overweight people has a job in which she deals with large folks regularly. Sweetea, you're far from the only one who doesn't see her "guru-ness."

Personal issues with her aside, though, I would declare anyone who made such claims under-educated, even if it were Stephen Hawking himself proclaiming that shampoo made you fat. I'm actually a bit shocked to hear that anyone makes such claims and gets taken seriously. I don't think shampoo could make you fat even if you drank it. :dizzy:

astrophe
02-14-2011, 12:45 AM
"Jillian the trainer" is a product too. She's got an image to sell and the products to sell with that image. She's good at her job, so good for her. I'm not sure she wrote the book or someone ghost wrote and slapped her on the cover to sell it. It too is a product.

But regardless of the products out there, it's up to us to be good shoppers/consumers. We all do the best we can with the budgets we've got whether it is workout dvds or groceries or books or whatever it is.

But yeah... I'm not into her approach/products. I can see where some people like that sort of presentation but I'm a night workout person. I need to watch DVDs that are more low key in presentation/tone.

I've screened Jillian stuff and I thought "Whoa. Too advanced right now, and that's would be when I'm ready for DAY workouts too boot. Too aggressive for night workout."

Which is why I like Ellen Barett or similar instead. Or Kelly Coffey. Ellen is cheery but not too cheerleadery, and Kelly is low key matter-of-fact, get through the workout type.

Even if you don't end up buying through collage, it's worth spending time viewing the clips.

http://www.collagevideo.com/

A.

mandalinn82
02-14-2011, 01:28 AM
I am torn on Jillian Michaels. In the beginning, I liked her. I understand the toughness is too much for people, but she used to have really sound advice. I used to listen to podcasts of her radio show on KFI and it was good stuff. Eat clean, watch your calories in vs. out, and move your body and lift things. With solid advice on how to DO that.

Then...she turned. She got more "This is the only way", she got more obsessed with the whole "remove everything remotely chemical from your life" while simultaneously pitching protein powders and fat burner supplements, and she started putting out workout videos that had poor form because they weren't her expertise (her yoga and kettlebell videos both had some SERIOUS PROBLEMS...as if she'd said to herself, "Hey, Yoga/Kettlebells are really in right now! I'll just throw together a video and make me some $$$" and didn't really pay attention to silly things like form. The yoga one was just moderately annoying, but the form on her Kettlebell video was bordering on reckless and dangerous).

I was a fan originally, because she did have really good advice on lifting and other topics back in the day (heck, she even posted HERE for a time, with all sound, sane advice). But now I think she's extended her brand WAY too far, and is starting to contradict herself and support some questionable ideas for moneymaking purposes.

ringmaster
02-14-2011, 07:13 PM
I've read and I believe I remember her saying on her old radio show she does take thyroid medication... so I'm not sure she is 100% against hormones.

I try to follow the ideas in the book best I can (not just from her, but I've also read elsewhere the chemicals in products are bad for us).. definitely living greener and organic costs more. It bugs me a bit she (and Bob) does those commercials on the biggest loser for the cereal and other products that really aren't healthy but then their books say they follow a different approach and not to eat things like that

peanutt
02-14-2011, 07:47 PM
Here's my take on the "chemicals in shampoo make you fat" claim....I read that as showing how prevalent in our daily lives a lot of these hormones/hormone-altering chemicals are and what they can do to you. It was meant to be an eye-opener rather than a scare tactic. If we're constantly surrounding ourselves and feeding ourselves chemicals that screw with the natural functioning of our bodies and hormone production, we're going to end up in a horribly unhealthy place.

(And yes, I have actually read the whole book.)

While I'm not a fan of the supplement/pill pitching, I will say that once I looked into the ingredients I found that they are herbal-based supplements rather than more "chemicals". Now, are they safe herbs is another debate...;)

I guess I'm just sick of reading thread after thread after thread bashing Jillian Michaels. I think she has done a lot of good, and is continuing to try and do a lot of good. Sure, she is using her brand to make herself wealthy, but I'm not going to vilify her for that. She may have given contestants on TBL advice on how to dehydrate or cheat the system to get further in the game, but they also had to be willing participants in that.

If you're not into her approach or her products, don't use 'em.

MariaMaria
02-14-2011, 08:21 PM
Except "natural" (or "herbal") does not in any way mean healthy.

I mean, nightshade's natural. Hemlock's natural. Both are plants! They're also both poisonous.

peanutt
02-14-2011, 10:11 PM
Except "natural" (or "herbal") does not in any way mean healthy.

I mean, nightshade's natural. Hemlock's natural. Both are plants! They're also both poisonous.

Absolutely! But she's not putting either of those in her supplements...

mandalinn82
02-14-2011, 11:29 PM
No, but one did contain bitter orange, which Consumer Reports listed as one of the "dirty dozen" supplement ingredients to avoid, and which CR called especially dangerous to combine with caffeine, which the same supplement also contains.

http://www.consumerreports.org/health/natural-health/dietary-supplements/supplement-side-effects/index.htm

Nola Celeste
02-15-2011, 02:41 AM
Yikes...just read that report on bitter orange. I'd heard it was potentially problematic, but I didn't realize it was basically the ephedra thing all over again.

I remember when ephedra and ephedrine-containing products were yanked off the shelves a few years ago after people taking them started developing major health problems. That's my biggest concern with herbal medicines and supplements: it seems as though they're a means to circumvent the FDA. "Don't mind us, we're just little ol' herbs, we couldn't possibly be dangerous!"

That just the trouble, though. If an herbal medication or "supplement" (the word companies use to avoid FDA scrutiny) is strong enough to have an effect, chances are it's strong enough to have side effects--yet unlike prescription medications, herbs are not quality-checked to ensure that dosages are precise. (The other possibility is that something's as harmless as celery--but when that's the case, it's also about as effective as celery, too.)

Holy schnikies, are some of the other "supplements" on that list actually used as medicines? Aconite and yohimbine might as well be hemlock (not that those are in JM's supplements--I'm just shocked they're in ANY supplement).

To get back to Jillian Michaels: I agree that she's just the name and face on the box and probably doesn't actually know much about the product she's selling, but when that happens, it might be time to step back. I don't begrudge her getting wealthy off of building a weight-loss empire, but she's diluting her brand in a dangerous way if she's putting her face on bottles of possible poison.

joyfulloser
02-16-2011, 10:59 AM
Ugggghhhhh....when I think of all the money I wasted in goofy supplements...I WANNA SCREAMMMMMMMMMMMMM!!!!!:crazy:

Save your money....eat less...move more!:)

Nola Celeste
02-16-2011, 04:29 PM
Wouldn't it be nice if we could get a refund, in one lump sum, of all the money we've ever spent on useless weight-loss supplements, exercise equipment, and failed diet plans? Think of the shopping spree we could have with it all! :)

sweetea
02-20-2011, 04:45 PM
peanutt, any ethical "nutritionist" (which she DEFINITELY is not), would never recommend the kind of severe dehydration these contestants go through on that show, just to lose an enormous amount of weight for the segment. Dr. Snyder, whose book I mentioned, went into a bit of detail about what contestants go through. I do not blame the contestants for agreeing to whatever stupid advice Jillian Michaels gives them, just as I don't blame patients for taking lousy advice from a lousy doctor who then gets sued with malpractice.

She needs to be booted off the air, but in the culture we live in, I'm sure she'll find even more success as time goes on. Says a lot for the culture we live in. I say bash-on.

peanutt
02-20-2011, 05:08 PM
Why is it seemingly impossible for some posters here to accept that not everyone shares their burning hatred of TBL or Jillian Michaels? I mean, we all agree to disagree with respect to various diet plans and food choices, but not about a TV show. Really.

Porthardygurl
02-20-2011, 05:40 PM
You know..how come there is so much talk about Jillian Micheals but there is no talk about Bob Harper? I mean he has his videos and books so what about him? I dont think i can say that im for or against Jillian Micheals and that is because i dont know her personally. I dont know how much of what we hear or read is just media or if its real or not...So i take everything with a grain of salt..what i do know however, is that there are other people out there in the diet industry, marketing all kinds of diets and options for weight loss and they arent exactly any better or any worse..so before anyone jumps into a Jillian bashing pool, what about all the others? I mean, talk about a pot calling a kettle black if you know what i mean?

MissKoo
02-20-2011, 06:52 PM
Wouldn't it be nice if we could get a refund, in one lump sum, of all the money we've ever spent on useless weight-loss supplements, exercise equipment, and failed diet plans? Think of the shopping spree we could have with it all! :)

A few years ago, I got a check in the mail as part of a class-action lawsuit. I had no idea why I was getting the check! Seems that I had purchased some kind of "supplement" from and tv shopping channel (yes, I admit it) that was supposed prevent a person from absorbing the fat in the food she/he was eating. Wow! Magic. Didn't work and lawsuit was settled.

I got seven bucks.:lol:

Caveat Emptor!!!!

Nola Celeste
02-20-2011, 08:03 PM
I don't know if Bob Harper is lending his support to a weight loss supplement containing a potentially dangerous substance, but a quick Google search doesn't turn up anything.

This isn't about bashing Michaels as Michaels, but about ridiculous weight loss claims like "shampoo will make you fat" and "take this supplement and lose weight safely and with ease." Those claims SHOULD be bashed. They should be debunked by everyone from Penn & Teller to James Randi to the Mythbusters to shouting it out on street corners. All of us who've ever wasted a dime on useless supplements or taken something that made us feel like crap or worse yet, had our health damaged by taking stuff that is essentially poison.

A friend of mine died in 2003 from liver failure thanks to a supplement she was taking for weight loss and "cleansing of toxins" from her body. It literally killed her. It's part of why I feel such antipathy toward the BS claims made by ANYONE--including Jillian Michaels--about herbal "supplements" for weight loss. Another part of my anger at snake-oil sellers is that I (and probably a great many of you reading this) have been taken in by them. I don't know about you, but I don't appreciate having my money taken as I'm being made a fool.

Bob Harper isn't being called on the carpet because he's not making these claims or allowing his name to be associated with those who make them. When he starts spouting dangerous stupidity, rest assured that he'll come in for a heaping helping of scorn as well.

What I don't get is why on earth anyone would want to defend a seller of potentially dangerous products meant to take advantage of desperate people who mistakenly put their trust in a company or person whom they believe to be honest.

Maybe I misunderstood your use of the "pot calling the kettle black" idiom, but I couldn't really be casting aspersions on Michaels when I'm guilty of the same kind of behavior because I am not a fitness guru selling an herbal supplement. I'm just a consumer who got a very sad education in the perils of herbal supplements.

Nola Celeste
02-20-2011, 08:33 PM
I did a little Googling and ran across this interview with Jillian Michaels:

iVillage Health interview with Jillian Michaels (http://www.ivillage.com/our-chat-jillian-michaels-part-2/4-a-106952)

The most pertinent part to what we're discussing is this excerpt:


Jillian: The bottom line is that your skin is transdermal and what that means is that anything you’re putting on your skin, you might as well be putting in your mouth. Nobody really appreciates that. It’s going through your skin and going into your system. You need to be incredibly mindful and careful about what you’re putting on your skin. What’s happening is that a lot of times products contain harmful ingredients, like sodium oil or sulfate, which is an extremely intense detergent. There are parabens (preservatives) in beauty products. These things are linked to cancer, genetic mutations and autoimmune diseases. In addition, parabens can create zenoestrogens that lead to breast cancer and ovarian cancers. Simultaneously, these zenoestrogens are making us fat—they’re making you sick and fat!

She's wrong. Not just a little wrong, but drastically wrong. Researchers are working hard to find out how to deliver drugs transdermally more effectively specifically because the skin is a really poor medium through which to move large molecules--things like hormones and proteins which tend to be huge. The whole point of skin is that it is not readily permeable. The stratum corneum doesn't let stuff through readily. Maybe we would have to worry about skin permeability if we were amphibians, but we aren't.


This is quackery of the first water. I'd be picking on anyone who said this out loud, let alone someone who gets listened to when speaking about health and fitness. There've been some quackalicious things said by others (Deepak Chopra, Dr. Phil, I'm looking at you), but saying that beauty products are "making you sick and fat" is just jaw-dropping.

I will have to add non-fattening shampoo to my shopping list along with tin foil to fashion into a hat that will keep the mind-control rays from reaching my brain, I guess. :dizzy:

She's right about olive oil being a great beauty product, though. I use that and coconut oil all the time. So cheap, so effective!

LightRaven
02-20-2011, 09:52 PM
:lol: Was it Mythbusters who tested the whole James Bond Goldfinger theory- that if you paint a persons body in gold that they will suffocate/become toxic and die? :lol:

Maybe it wasn't mythbusters, but I know it's definitely been tested and debunked. Our skin is not easily permeable by liquid in general. Oh jeez.

LR

Porthardygurl
02-21-2011, 06:39 PM
I think maybe the point she was making, is that people out there are dying of illnesses related to simple products they are using containing chemicals that are pro-cancer..of course there are many things that cause cancers in the world, and i think its true, that the less chemicals we use in or on our bodies the better..that being said..a supplement..may or may not be healthy..but we dont know and i guess thats why its our chocie to buy in or not buy in..but in the end i want to be one of those people who personally can say " i did it without all the gimmicks out there"

Nola Celeste
02-21-2011, 07:47 PM
Everything is made up of chemicals, including table salt and rocks and water and human tissue. "Chemicals" is a meaningless scare term used to sell a supplement that "purges toxins" or is "all-natural" (two more meaningless terms).

It is very like selling tin-foil hats while talking about the importance of remaining pure and free from mind-control rays. Well, with one difference: there really are toxic things to avoid in some environments, but most of us don't work in heavy-metal refineries or radioactive waste processing facilities. Those who do wear protective clothing, they don't pop an herbal pill or slap on some color-changing foot pads to cleanse their bodies.

Bottom line: unless you've been eating paint chips, you're statistically likelier to die of pure, all-natural causes lilke accident, infection, or idiopathic disease than of any kind of poisoning. Hospitals are not full of people suffering from shampoo-related scalp cancers and moisturizer toxicity. All-natural sunlight, on the other hand, can definitely cause skin cancer. Fortunately, we can put chemicals on our skin to prevent it from happening.

Hooray for the modern world! It's not perfect, but it's a long stretch better than living in a state of medieval superstition or relying on what snake-oil peddlers tell you rather than careful research.

LightRaven: Yes, that was MythBusters who debunked the Goldfinger myth! I loved that episode, though I felt sorry for Adam having to get shaved everywhere so he could get painted gold. The rectal thermometer was the final indignity. LOL, poor guy. :D

I love that show tremendously. :)

boxen06
02-24-2011, 09:29 PM
I really like Jillian's workouts; theyre my favorite videos. But like an idiot, i bought her fat burning capsules. Those pills made me dizzy and I felt like i was going to pass out - not good!

Nola Celeste
02-25-2011, 06:11 PM
I really like Jillian's workouts; theyre my favorite videos. But like an idiot, i bought her fat burning capsules. Those pills made me dizzy and I felt like i was going to pass out - not good!

We all wish there were a magic pill to make this easier, but there isn't--no matter who's selling it to us. I've bought my fair share of pills and shakes and whatnot too, and they worked about as well for me as those pills did for you. It's not idiotic, it's an act of hope and desperation--a feeling a lot of us know when it comes to weight loss.

I hear a lot of good things about most of her workout videos. Looks like the best bet is to stick with those, since we know they DO work. :)

memyselfni
04-07-2011, 05:55 PM
Ok, I have been on this site several times for completely unrelated topics, but I decided to join just so I can voice whats going through my head. As someone who suffers from PCOS (a hormone imbalance) I have come to adore the teachings of Jillian Michales in her Master Your.... book. I still use plastic and perfume and so on, but there is a huge truth to what she says about the chemicals in them going into your body!

First anyone who thinks your skin cant absorb something thru it then why does the nicoteen patch work so well for smokers? Why can you put a patch on your hip to prevent pregnancy? How can your rub wild yam estrogen cream on your hands as directed to help with menopause? How come some women who color their hair absorb the aniline in their scalp rsulting in dark brown urine? Why do people think this sounds so quaky is modern medical is using the skin as a trasmitter for many chemicals/medicine?? You don't believe me? Take some garlic and olive oil, mush up the garlic and put it on the souls of your feet and in about 30 minutes your breath will reak of gralic!

Now I am not saying throw ur make up out and smell of an old hippie I am saying be more aware of these chemicals and stop being so hard headed and writing it off as if all these chemicals are perfectly fine and pose no harm. Therefore what she is saying is true to a degree and she isnt pulling this all out of a hat to make herself wealthy.

As far as the Biggest Loser goes does anyone realise she is under contract to do those dumb lil promos they put on the show? Probably a huge reason for her leaving the show! She said she feels with her knowlege she can reach more poeple apart from biggest loser....hmmmm? Sounds to me she isnt afraid of stepping out of the lime light to help more people out!

I will agree that her detox pills and a few of her DVD's were not her best choice...but until you know what its like to be approached with million dollar offers donbt judge her. And for someone who who talks about toxins all the time...Im sure she was prime canidate for the ad...I dont think she should have taken it, and she prob would say the same thing...but last time I checked she was still human...correct?

About the bitter orange and caffine thing...I have not found that any of the products she endorses has both ingreidents...check your lables b?c thats incorrect. She does have a pill that has bitter orange, and another that has caffine...but not both together!

Anyways...I like her approach..she is far from quaky! If you dont agree with what she says then lose weight another way...theres 78898789674782364826492874 diffrent ways to do it...pick urs!

But i warn you if you think slamming diet cokes at every meal, loading up on low fat no fat foods loaded with chemicals is so healpful...then do a 10 year study on yourself...you'll likely be heavier, more unhealthy, energy deprived and so on after years of fooling your body into this "food" All she says is eat whole natural foods, avoid overloaded chemicals, drink out of glass instead of plastic and use chemicals sparingly in your home...whats the problem?? Someone somewhere things your all nuts too, you just dont have a public auidence for poeple to talk about you and bash your every move...stop hyperfocusing on other peoples flaws people! Goodness!

mandalinn82
04-07-2011, 06:06 PM
About the bitter orange and caffine thing...I have not found that any of the products she endorses has both ingreidents...check your lables b?c thats incorrect. She does have a pill that has bitter orange, and another that has caffine...but not both together!

I'm referring specifically to the "Jillian Michaels Extreme Maximum Strength Fat Burner". It does, in fact, contain both ingredients together (the bolding below is mine, to indicate those ingredients):

Jillian Michaels EXTREME Maximum Strength Fat Burner Ingredients:

CLA, white willow bark, grapefruit extract, bitter orange extract, blood orange extract, sweet orange extract, coleus forskohlii, tribulus terrestis, yerba mate, coffee bean extract, guarana, and cocoa seed extract.

JohnP
04-07-2011, 06:13 PM
Jillian Michaels has become what I dispise most about the weight loss industry.

This is a SIMPLE topic. The diet industry makes it confusing because that is how you make $$$. The ridiculous claims about shampoo are not surprising at all.

They rolled a truckload of money up to her driveway and she sold out.

I don't find her coaching style objectionable at all. It's the BS marketing claims that anger me.

Nola Celeste
04-07-2011, 07:29 PM
First anyone who thinks your skin cant absorb something thru it then why does the nicoteen patch work so well for smokers? Why can you put a patch on your hip to prevent pregnancy? How can your rub wild yam estrogen cream on your hands as directed to help with menopause?

I never said that there was no such thing as trans-dermal medication. But two of those things are drugs recognized by the medical community and the third is a folk remedy that remains unproven. And while you're right that handling garlic or using henna (my research showed more information about natural dyes staining urine than artificial ones) can turn something a funny smell or color, those things don't have an effect on physiology. It's no more dangerous than eating beets and carrots and seeing the funny colors they produce in the potty.

Molecules have physical characteristics that limit where they go and what they do. Big honkin' proteins don't make it through skin while smaller molecules like nicotine do. A toy poodle fits through a doggie door that a Great Dane can't enter. In this case, JM claims that entire herds of elephants are squeezing through that little doggie door every time we wash our hair.

There is no science to back this up. By what mechanism would large molecules move through skin? We've evolved to have fairly impermeable skin; if we didn't, we'd be susceptible to poisoning every time we waded across a stream or touched a toxic plant.

You just proved my point that substances that affect the body's function when taken in through the skin are called drugs, not beauty products.

memyselfni
04-07-2011, 08:40 PM
I stand corrected on that one Manndalinn82, thanks for clarifying that...I couldnt find it anywhhere on the other products I looked at and thought it may have been a misunderstanding...I see it is in fact true.

memyselfni
04-07-2011, 09:10 PM
Like I posted I still use platics, lotions ect... I do try and limit it though. I think that there are many people who are extreem in what they believe as far as the enviromental factors and our health. She is more extreem than most, but my point is I think its wrong to write her off as some quack just b/c of her views on make up on skin. In her book she goes on and on about eating healthy unprocessed foods, eating whole foods and enjoying more foods that are organic. To me this is like the tosca reno Eating clean book, except isnt of dummed down with pictures and simple facts, this is the explanation of WHY and HOW it all works. I know from my own experienec that eating clean really does work and my body responds crazy and out of wack when binge on some processed crap now. So I can see the difference from what I used to eat to how I eat now. I guess what I am trying to get at is yes, she chose to market herself for stupid diet pills and yes on Biggest Loser she throws in thosse dumb ads for progresso soup and so on (because she is contracted to do those I am sure) but it doesnt take away from some of the best points of her Master Your Metabolism book.

Its like Atkins...people say he's a quack but as extreem as he was he managed to grab hold of our attention and at least break the mold for our thinking that all fat is bad and low cal low fat was all it took to lose weight. He made us look at the truth behind cals in and cals out and changed the diet industry. yet in many ways you can say he cashed in on some stuff too just in a different way. Look at all those marketed Atkins products including the one and only milk your "allowed to have" Atkins milk. But it doesnt take away from his science and what he brought to our attention.

I think Jillian makes great points and I like her whole food eating advice. I dont think it would harm any of us if we switched over to more organic products both in and out of the kitchen..if thats not your slice of pie then forgo all the enviro stuff...but just FYI she is def not the only one to make such claims and some people get super super into it (heard of Dr Mercola?) and make her approach seem a lot more normal. Many people try to avoid toxins...shes onee of them and yes she believes that an overload of chemicals in out house mess with our hormones and can lead to weight gain.