Nutrition and Labeling - Full cream milk?




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cacaphony
02-10-2011, 07:18 AM
I've noticed that full cream milk gets a lot of bad rap, and I'm just wondering if it really is any worse for you than skimmed, given that you don't have some kind of disease to begin with that makes it bad for you, and not counting calorie differences.

I mean, I really like full cream milk as a beverage - more than juice or soda. I cook and make coffee with skim, because the taste doesn't matter there, but drinking skim milk isn't tasty.


kaw
02-10-2011, 09:35 AM
There's nothing wrong with whole milk "not counting calorie differences." It's the calorie differences that can pack on pounds over time. (I'm assuming you're not lactose intolerant, otherwise any milk with lactose in it would make you uncomfortable.)

Personally, I have 1/2 and 1/2 in my morning coffee, and I eat full-fat yogurt. On the rare occasions that I drink milk, I drink 1%, but that's because it's what my family likes and hence what we have in the house. But I keep track of calories, and adjust my portions of dairy -- like everything else -- so that the total calories stay within the day's allotment.

//b. strong,
Kim

4xcharm
02-10-2011, 10:46 AM
I haven't gone back to verify the facts, but I recall reading that during WWII, the doctors noticed that the American GIs that were operated on had noticeably more fatty deposits in their arteries than the other Allies. This was attributed to the fact that Americans drank massive amounts of whole milk. Homogenized milk was even more suspect, as the milkfat had been broken into tiny globules that could more easily attach to smaller artery walls. I love whole milk myself. But when I drink it, it's for the pleasure of it. Like a treat, not a beverage.


QuilterInVA
02-12-2011, 03:36 PM
There's nothing wrong with it if you don't mind having heart disease. All that fat is good for no one.

Nola Celeste
02-12-2011, 08:11 PM
The connections between dietary fat and heart disease are more tenuous than scientists once thought they were. Remember in the 80s when all dietary fat was treated as toxic waste? Research on low-carbohydrate eating (and there's a lot more of that than there used to be) suggests that fats--including animal fats such as those found in whole milk and butter--are not the "heart attack on a plate" they were once presented to be. Then there's the whole "French paradox" thing: traditional French cooking is loaded with animal fats in butter, cream sauces, pork fat, sausage, full-fat milk in cafe au lait--yet the French rate of heart disease is demonstrably lower than that in the U.S.

And then there's the Maasai, whose diet is largely made up of meat, milk, blood and grain, yet who have half the blood cholesterol levels of the average American and have virtually no history of heart disease.

With that said, if you're watching your calorie intake, you'll have to choose between larger portions of lower-fat milk or small portions of full-fat milk. It's up to you to decide what you think is worth it. Skim milk tastes like water with a little chalk stirred in to me, so I empathize with your love of full-fat milk--but it does pack a caloric wallop. It's the only thing for proper cafe au lait with chicory, though. :)

JOLINA
02-12-2011, 09:05 PM
Babies need whole milk for the development of their brain.
Adults need whole milk to keep their nerves healthy.

I was told that if a person had a nerve problem like I developed... sciatica & carpal tunnel...plus Trigeminal Neuralgia - facial, nerve pain, try switching to whole milk.

I had switched from drinking whole milk to skim milk to cut down my calories...a huge mistake... and after a few months developed all sorts of nerve disorders.

I had to go back to drinking almost a quart of whole milk a day. The pain eased quite a bit in a few weeks. After a few months all the pain was gone.

It is the enzymes in the butterfat of whole milk that your nerves need to keep them healthy.

I will NEVER drink anything but whole milk again.

:cheer2:

LandonsBaby
02-16-2011, 06:48 PM
Homogenized milk is a problem but non-homogenized whole milk shouldn't be an issue unless you have a dairy intolerance. I don't buy this idea that natural fats kill us. Not one bit.

Nola Celeste
02-16-2011, 08:56 PM
I'm not sure that homogenization affects milk, now that you mention it. What would be the mechanism by which fat globules unevenly distributed are okay, but tiny fat globules in suspension are not? Not meaning to be cynical, just unsure of how homogenization would affect milk any more than shaking my salad dressing to form an emulsion makes it less healthy than if I were to leave it in its unmixed oil-and-vinegar form.

There are others who say that pasteurization is also bad for milk, but...well, when I think about where cows have been and where milk comes from, I have a tough time embracing raw, unpasteurized milk. Unprocessed foods are generally a good idea, but not all processing is therefore bad; I'll take washed vegetables and pasteurized milk over an e. coli infection any day of the week.

Suzanne 3FC
02-17-2011, 12:39 AM
Then there's the whole "French paradox" thing: traditional French cooking is loaded with animal fats in butter, cream sauces, pork fat, sausage, full-fat milk in cafe au lait--yet the French rate of heart disease is demonstrably lower than that in the U.S.


Unfortunately that isn't true anymore :( At one time, the French were healthier even though they included full fat cream, etc. But their eating habits were much different than ours. They ate much smaller portions. They also ate plenty of fresh fruit etc and didn't fill up on fats. And they were more active. Meal portions have been on the rise in France including more fast food and processed foods. Activity levels have also changed. In other words, their diets and habits are closer to ours now than they used to be, and their rate of heart disease and diabetes is increasing accordingly.

Sadly, that's a trend all over the world.

Cacaphony - The AHA recommends no more than 7% of your daily calories come from saturated fats. If you haven't had a good exam lately, have your doctor do a full blood workup and let her or him advise you how much sat fats are good for you.

norahdavex
08-07-2011, 07:44 PM
hey i usually drink skim milk but made the mistake of swapping the whole milk bottle for skim milk today and I am worried that I would put on weight easily. the bottle label says it has 6.0 gm fat and 120 calories where as the skim has 1.0 gm fat and 75 calories. I do exercise regularly and I weigh 53 kg and im 5'4''. Please help.

Ursula745
08-07-2011, 08:32 PM
A doctor once told me that technically, we're not supposed to drink any milk; that we are the only mammals that do not wean their young off milk. All others do, and end up drinking only water. Not sure how much truth there is to that. But, I'm not giving up my chocolate milk.

kelly315
08-08-2011, 12:35 AM
Whole milk has a lot more fat, saturated fat (5g/cup), and cholesterol (35mg/cup)- all of which are hard on your heart in anything more than moderate quantities. That's three times the saturated fat of Mcdonald's fries (small), and as much cholesterol as a hamburger and a half.

Of course, anything is OK in moderation- so if you're willing to take the extra calories, and only drink it in moderation, it's not the end of the world.

kelly315
08-08-2011, 12:39 AM
Babies need whole milk for the development of their brain.
Adults need whole milk to keep their nerves healthy.

I was told that if a person had a nerve problem like I developed... sciatica & carpal tunnel...plus Trigeminal Neuralgia - facial, nerve pain, try switching to whole milk.

I had switched from drinking whole milk to skim milk to cut down my calories...a huge mistake... and after a few months developed all sorts of nerve disorders.

I had to go back to drinking almost a quart of whole milk a day. The pain eased quite a bit in a few weeks. After a few months all the pain was gone.

It is the enzymes in the butterfat of whole milk that your nerves need to keep them healthy.

I will NEVER drink anything but whole milk again.

:cheer2:

Milk is not a natural part of our diet as adults, in fact we have a gene that is made to turn off our ability to digest milk (lactose) as we get to be fully grown. The vast majority of the world is largely lactose intolerant because of this (less so in countries like in Europe and the US where we culturally drink a lot of milk- this postpones the gene from turning off). It's possible that some people- like you, for example- reap benefits from milk, either because there is something not found in your diet elsewhere or because of a propensity toward certain diseases.

Purrfect
08-08-2011, 12:45 AM
A doctor once told me that technically, we're not supposed to drink any milk; that we are the only mammals that do not wean their young off milk. All others do, and end up drinking only water. Not sure how much truth there is to that. But, I'm not giving up my chocolate milk.

This is what I have always read from numerous sources. We are the only mammals who give our young milk after the weaning period takes place. MILK is not the best calcium source nor does it appear to absorb and be assimilated in the body as well as plant based food.

Try reading Marion Nestles book, she's got the most rational and comprehensive approach I've seen yet. It's called "WHAT TO EAT"

tdiprincess
08-19-2011, 02:49 PM
Whole milk has a lot more fat, saturated fat (5g/cup), and cholesterol (35mg/cup)- all of which are hard on your heart in anything more than moderate quantities. That's three times the saturated fat of Mcdonald's fries (small), and as much cholesterol as a hamburger and a half.

Of course, anything is OK in moderation- so if you're willing to take the extra calories, and only drink it in moderation, it's not the end of the world.

I'm going to be a little bit of a booger on the comparison of fries, only because of course it would be lower in saturated fat. You're frying potatoes (no saturated fat or cholesterol) and then frying them in veggie oil (which is small amounts of saturated fat). Naturally, these are going to be quite a bit less saturated fat than full fat milk, which comes from an animal so it is going to have cholesterol and saturated fat without question.
Sorry.. I don't mean this in a rude or mean way. Just showing that you're kinda comparing apples to oranges here.. :hug:

Anyway, drink whatever the heck you want. Make sure you keep a check on your fat levels and your calorie levels. There shouldn't be such things as bad foods. We all are going to eat and drink what we want to.
Everything in moderation!

lin43
09-02-2011, 05:06 PM
I rarely eat low-fat or even reduced fat dairy products. If I can get it, I eat full-fat Fage yogurt and full-fat cheeses. As for milk, I don't drink it often, but I only keep whole milk in my house since that's all my husband will drink, and I don't feel like buying two different milks. So, when I make a cafe latte at home, for example, I always use full-fat milk.

You just need to budget your calories accordingly. I don't think the fat is bad for you.

PhatBeth
09-07-2011, 01:55 PM
Back in my high school biology classes our teacher told us that milk is not very favorable for adults since the digestion is incomplete due to the absentia of the digestive juice casein.:dizzy:
the side effects are not very immediate but very sever some years to come for you will suffer from diseases like high blood pressure.

mszeus
09-07-2011, 02:02 PM
Good post. I love milk and most dairy products but whole milk is very fattening. I have been drinking skim milk for over 20 years now. It is an acquired taste, I will admit. Organic Skim Milk is actually what I drink except when my husband is doing the grocery shopping. I think if you tried to gradually cut down from whole milk to 2% and then 1%,etc. You could do it.
I do use half and half for my morning coffee, not giving that up. Also, for cooking, yes whole milk wins.

fieryredfilly
01-23-2012, 03:14 AM
I'm typically a lurker (actually, I guess always a lurker here since this is my first post) but I just had to chime in, because dairy is something that's very important to me.

At this point in my journey I've lost a little over 30 lbs and one of the BIGGEST reasons for this is replacing horrible processed snack choices for a serving or two of whole, raw (unpasteurized and non-homogenized) milk. Now, I have my own cow and dairy goats. So I know what they eat, what they look like, how clean they are. My cow is a Jersey, so she has more butterfat than what you drink in store bought milk (which is mostly from Holstein cattle). I do skim from the top to make my own butter and sour creams and to get cream for coffee and whipped cream, but it's in NO way skim. That doesn't mean I'd keep losing weight if I drank a gallon of that milk and still ate a bunch of junky foods. It is all in moderation, and counting calories, just like everything. (Also, most of you folks can't get the real deal, but non-pasteurized milk contains lactase, which means if you're "lactose intolerant" you can drink it.)

I want to say too (since someone mentioned cattle and "how they live" and "where milk comes from") that my cow is a very conscious individual, hates being dirty and prefers any dry, clean area to a dry, dirty area or a muddy one. Big dairies where your pasteurized milk comes from is a different story...

Oh and one more thing. Humans are NOT the only animals that continue to drink milk into adulthood. Almost ALL animals love milk. Horses, pigs, dogs and cats (in moderation here, but they can still drink it if raw), chickens, of course rodents, and even adult cows. In livestock breeds, if the mare/cow/sow/goat doe/ewe does not have another pregnancy, the youngster will not usually willingly stop nursing and the dam will continue to let her offspring nurse indefinately.

Back to the topic at hand, if you're drinking 8 or 10 ounces of whole milk a day or every other day, and replacing something like cheez-its or a snickers or an other unhealthy snack, I wouldn't necessarily sweat that it's not skim.

Vladadog
01-25-2012, 05:45 AM
In 2008 my HDL was 48 (you should have over 50 and the higher the better).
In 2009 it was 44.
In 2010 I had lost 80 pounds (thank you 3FC!!!), was eating much less junk food, and my HDL was up to 59.
In 2011 I switched to drinking only raw milk - unhomogenized, unpasteurized - a gallon a week and my HDL is now up to 86.

These results may not be typical but I know I really value my raw milk for what it has done for my health.