Weight Loss Support - Is my calorie intake too low?




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30 Fat Still Awesome
02-10-2011, 03:51 AM
Hi chicas (and dudes?),

When I go on a diet, I REALLY go on a diet. Here's what I'm eating:

9-10 am - Piece of fruit in morning
1 hr later, some milk tea
2-3 pm - meal: usually salad with chicken or fish
7ish - carrots or another fruit or cucumber
9-10 pm - tea (only cuz its friggin' cold right now)

Is that bad? Oh I sip water all day. I used to eat all day, sweets, big meals 3 times a day.

My exercise routine right now:

Morning Jog/walk (mostly walk) for 30mins to an hour. Right before bed, some light weights and sit ups and stuff.

What say you?


Asherdoodles87
02-10-2011, 06:43 AM
Do you know about how many calories a day you're eating? I think you could end up getting really hungry after a few days of eating like that. I would eat more then just a piece of fruit in the morning, unless that's all you can manage to grab in the morning. And, you might want to add another veggie or fruit to the lunch. And, some more meat at 7 for some more protein. Some, nuts and yogurt would be a good addition too.

I think you could eat a lot more and still lose weight. You should look at a site that suggests a calorie amount for your height and weight. I eat 1200 calories a day, and I eat more then that.

shannonmb
02-10-2011, 06:53 AM
I don't want to come off as preachy, but you know it's supposed to be a lifestyle change for the most part, right? I don't see how eating that way would be sustainable for very long. Honestly, I have done diets like that in the past, but one weird PMS day or someone looks at me wrong and it becomes a year-long binge!

You can eat a whole lot more than that -- lean protein, complex carbs, low-fat dairy and tons of fruits and veggies. Your body will get the nutrition it needs, and you will settle in to a routine of not being hungry, losing weight, and feeling good. The biggest key to my losing weight this time has been realizing that I am not being punished and I don't have to suffer *at all* to do this. A bit of discomfort from time to time with cravings, but no starving or suffering!

Also, my sleep doctor says no exercise right before bed -- it stimulates you and it takes longer to get into that good deep sleep you need.

I do hope you will rethink your plan a bit, hopefully some others will pop on to give their take on it. Best wishes to you!!


Shmead
02-10-2011, 07:37 AM
Eat more. At 270, eat a lot more. Food is not the enemy, and not eating doesn't prove anything. Here's what I said recently in another thread on this subject:

I think a lot of us think diets are "punishment" for being fat. We believe what the media reinforces: that fat people are bad people--lazy, weak-willed, self-indulgent slobs, and that fat is the physical sign of God's displeasure towards you for being such a lousy human being.

Under that view, diets have to be painful, because it's atonement, it's payment. The more painful it is, the more effective it is.

This attitude kept me fat for years. I would go on VLC diets because hey, more punishment is better, right? Get it over with. Then I would lose a bunch of weight until I "broke"--usually about 6 months, because I am pretty tough, and when I broke, I'd take it as more evidence that I was weak and pathetic and needed even more punishment.

It was only when I learned to look at the fat as the biologic result of consuming more calories than I consumed, and at dieting as the simple matter of eating fewer, that I was able to diet in a sustainable way. Moderate calorie restriction and a plan I could stay on easily made all the difference. Instead of thinking "what's the LEAST I can stand to eat?" I started to think "what's the MOST I can eat and still lose weight?"

Suffering and punishing myself got me to 300 lbs. Eating as much as I could while still losing took off 140 lbs--120 of them in a year.

It's not about having a super-strict plan, it's about sticking super-strictly to a reasonable, livable plan. It's got to be something you can do 365 days in a row. It's got to be something that you can do even the week you work 14 hour days for seven days straight, even the week your dog dies, even the week you get strep throat, even the week of your birthday, even the week you mom visits, even on vacation, even Christmas.

You find that plan--and it's out there--in a year you'll be looking forward to bathing suit season and in two years people will be saying "I just can't imagine you overweight. That's so weird".

Iianae
02-10-2011, 07:42 AM
Schmead...wonderful WONDERFUL response!!

seagirl
02-10-2011, 08:39 AM
How long do these "diets" usually last? That doesn't look like a sustainable plan at all, which you've probably figured out.

Why not visit a nutritionist to get an idea of what healthy eating looks like, somewhere between the 2 extremes you have chosen.

niafabo
02-10-2011, 08:47 AM
I don't wanna sound harsh but frankly you are hurting yourself and your weight loss efforts and you seriously need to take things more seriously. You are literally starving yourself eating that much food especially when you combine it with that much cardio. It is foolish. You will look terribly unhealthy before long, and you are already probably losing a lot of lean muscle mass. You might be losing weight now but you are destroying your metabolism and it will be way harder for you later on. I think you have an eating disorder. Get help!

Heather
02-10-2011, 09:01 AM
Welcome to 3fc!!

We're all about healthy weight loss here, and hopefully we can give you some information to create a sustainable lifestyle!

The truth is that you are setting yourself up for failure by dieting to such extremes. Sure, you might lose weight for a while on your plan. But at some point it's going to stop working. Maybe it's a piece of cake at an office party. Or a stressful day that has you reach for one of your trigger foods, or just getting sick and tired of the same food every. single. day.

But at some point you are going to go off plan. And you may even really spiral out of control. And before you know it, you're off plan. You're gaining weight -- all the weight you lost and then some. And you think 'Well, that's it. Diets don't work'.

I say this because it happens all the time. I've been on this site over 5 years, and that is one of the most common stories around. But it doesn't have to be that way!

As you've been reading in the other posts, the way to a more successful result (where you lose the weight and KEEP it off), is to find a plan that's sustainable for you! For many of us it means eating real food 3-6 times a day. The details vary a lot.

You should also know that our weight determines how many calories we burn a day. So a person who weighs 165 (your goal) will burn fewer calories doing everything than you do now. And by everything I mean, everything. Bruthing your teeth, driving your car, working out, sleeping.

So, people who weigh more need more to fuel their bodies to just do basic activities. Generally, it isn't recommended that anyone eat fewer than 1200 calories/day! You are probably eating half of that. There are certainly people who can and do eat less than that to lose, but generally those who sustain it are the people who are much smaller than you are now.

The good news for you is that means you can eat quite a lot of food AND still lose weight regularly, and sustainably.

How many calories? Well, to be honest that really depends on a lot of factors. We are all different. But if you're interested in learning more, we can certainly give you more info. If you don't want to actually try calorie counting now, we can still give you some ideas to get started more sustainably.

bargoo
02-10-2011, 09:30 AM
Your diet is way too rigid, I am afraid you will not be able to keep going on such little food for very long. Do you have any ideas how many calories a day you are eating ? Doesn't look like much to me, You can eat a healthy well rounded diet and still lose weight.

Emme
02-10-2011, 10:54 AM
How many calories are you taking in daily? I am 5'8 and I eat anywhere from 1650-1850 calories each day and I have lost between 1 and 1 1/2 pounds every week so far. You definitely need to add more food in there.

Larry H
02-10-2011, 11:10 AM
My experience in the past has been that if I try and cut down too much, I start to feel I am deprived. When I feel deprived in a short period I do something about it. That something is always overeating on a binge. My last binge lasted four (4) years.

This time I am eating at reasonable calorie level and a well balanced diet coupled with that four letter word exercise. :carrot: I don't feel deprived this time. As a matter of fact I can see this as a life style for me not just as another diet.

Larry,
----------
Insanity -- Doing the same thing repeatedly and expecting different results

beerab
02-10-2011, 11:59 AM
Hi chicas (and dudes?),

When I go on a diet, I REALLY go on a diet. Here's what I'm eating:

9-10 am - Piece of fruit in morning
1 hr later, some milk tea
2-3 pm - meal: usually salad with chicken or fish
7ish - carrots or another fruit or cucumber
9-10 pm - tea (only cuz its friggin' cold right now)


Something more acceptable would be:

Breakfast:
quiche with veggies
1 orange

Lunch
Grilled chicken or fish with salad that contains, tomato, onion, an ounce of cheese, 2 tbsp of dressing, and any other veggues you like. This should be a pretty large salad.

Snack:
Yogurt or apple with peanut butter.

Dinner
Sauteed Chicken Breasts with Summer Squash Casserole

At 270 pounds you should be eating 1800 calories. Your meal looks too low to get all the nutrients you need.

Also I'd say the exercise is okay IF you up the calories to 1800 a day.

LIke others have said this is for life- don't restrict so bad you binge later (which is what MANY of us have done).

sacha
02-10-2011, 12:19 PM
Very low fat, very low protein, sets you up for muscle loss.

You say "when I go on a diet...I really go on a diet"
^
That implies that you've done this before. Obviously it hasn't helped you lead a sustainable healthy lifestyle ~ so why keep repeating what doesn't work?

At the end of the day, all long-term maintainers will tell you the same thing - only a sustainable healthy plan works.

Ruthxxx
02-10-2011, 12:29 PM
Good advice! I see you've not been back since you posted this. I hope you take time to follow the suggestions; otherwise, you are setting yourself up for failure.

30 Fat Still Awesome
02-10-2011, 01:10 PM
Hello Ladies!

Thanks for all the advice. When I said I really go on a diet - I HAVE done this sort of thing before, lost like 10 pounds and kept it off. I understand that its a lifestyle change.

Schmead, I don't think this is punishing myself. Before, my eating was having sensible meals 3 times a day (with a few sweets mixed in). I don't feel like my portions were big, but I still wasn't losing any weight. I've replaced the chocolate bar with fruit, and the chips or crackers with cut veggies. Really, that's ALL I've done. I never really drank too many sodas or anything too and don't drink alcohol.

Does anyone know where I can find a good calorie counter? Maybe that would help me figure out what zone I need to stay in.

Beerab, thanks for that - that looks like a good plan as well. Although I might feel like I'm eating too much and get out of control. That's my fear.

Heather, when you say "needs calories to carry you through the day" are you talking about having low energy and stuff? Because honestly, when I'm doing a diet like this, I have MORE energy than I would when I eat a whole 3 meals a day. Could it be that my body is different?

Thanks guys for responding. Ruth it takes me awhile to get around to posting here, but I intend to stay. You guys are super cool. ;)

Oh and.. when do we get the cool weight meter thingies?

AZ Sunrises
02-10-2011, 01:26 PM
Hi chicas (and dudes?),

When I go on a diet, I REALLY go on a diet. Here's what I'm eating:

9-10 am - Piece of fruit in morning
1 hr later, some milk tea
2-3 pm - meal: usually salad with chicken or fish
7ish - carrots or another fruit or cucumber
9-10 pm - tea (only cuz its friggin' cold right now)

Is that bad? Oh I sip water all day. I used to eat all day, sweets, big meals 3 times a day.

My exercise routine right now:

Morning Jog/walk (mostly walk) for 30mins to an hour. Right before bed, some light weights and sit ups and stuff.

What say you?

Diet is a personal path. Some people do great with low carb. Others do great calorie counting. Some people do well on medically supervised very low calorie. You just have to figure out what works for you and is sustainable.

You're 270 lbs per the info you have posted under your avatar. I'm sure you've read enough to know that you can lose a healthy amount per week on 1400-1800 calories. I'm sure you've read that going below 1200 calories isn't particularly healthy. I'm sure you have some sort of idea how many calories you're ingesting.

What do you think?

Heather
02-10-2011, 01:26 PM
Heather, when you say "needs calories to carry you through the day" are you talking about having low energy and stuff? Because honestly, when I'm doing a diet like this, I have MORE energy than I would when I eat a whole 3 meals a day. Could it be that my body is different?

No, I mean that when you weigh 270 pounds, your body is going to burn more calories than when you weigh 165. So, in order to maintain it's functions, a 270 pound body needs more calories than a 165 pound body.

For instance, all of us having something called a basal metabolic rate (bmr). It's the number of calories our body basically burns at rest. Some consider it the bare minimum number of calories you need in a day. People who weigh more tend to have a higher bmr than people who weigh less.

And people who weigh more also burn more calories in all their activity than a smaller person. You might burn 150 calories walking a mile, but a 150 pound person might burn 100.

If you're not giving your body enough calories to even meet its most basic needs, especially if you aren't being supervised by a physician, then you may be setting yourself up for trouble.

Also, eating too few calories often means you aren't getting in enough nutrients.

It seems from your response that you feel fine, and not deprived. I guess I'm wondering why you asked if you were eating enough if you think you are?

Heather
02-10-2011, 01:29 PM
As for a weight tracker, you can get one when you've been here 20 days and have 20 posts.

Calorie trackers, there are a lot of them. A lot of people like dailyplate.com or fitday.com. If you poke around the calorie counters forum you'll find a lot of discussions on this and on estimating the number of calories.

girlonfire
02-10-2011, 02:42 PM
I think everything that needs to be said has already been said, but a good calorie counter is sparkpeople.com! They have a fun little wheel you spin and get points if you count your calories. What you are eating is WAY too little and sparkpeople will give you a calorie estimate based on your weight and activity level.

Good luck! :)

beerab
02-10-2011, 02:45 PM
Hello Ladies!
Does anyone know where I can find a good calorie counter? Maybe that would help me figure out what zone I need to stay in.

Beerab, thanks for that - that looks like a good plan as well. Although I might feel like I'm eating too much and get out of control. That's my fear.


I use sparkpeople.com but there are many other trackers.

If you feel you are eating too much that's the great thing about the tracker, it can show you that you are eating on target, OR like you said too much.

Kimberly2011
02-10-2011, 04:27 PM
As for calorie trackers - I love the one on Livestrong.com (daily plate).

ncuneo
02-10-2011, 04:29 PM
Your plan looks like at best 500-800 cals - that my friend is unhealthy, sorry. We all can render opinions on how many cals you should be consuming for your weight and height until the cows come home, but in the end only you'll be able to determine how many you need to lose weight and what will be a sustainable lifestyle for you to maintain that loss. I've always been a fan of starting at the highest number of healthy cals possible that render a 1-2 lbs per week loss, and hang out there for as long as possible. If and when you stall change your exercise and remove more processed foods and incorporate more whole foods before dropping your cals.

I know this theory is also debated, but IMO you should be eating smaller meals and snacks 5-6 xs a day to keep your metabolism functioning at it's peak performance. Barely eating 3xs a days is going to bring your metabolism to a halt.

You have to have been a memeber for 20 or 30 days before you can get a weight ticker.

Good luck to you!

30 Fat Still Awesome
02-10-2011, 05:24 PM
Hello again,

John, exactly. I read somewhere that kick starting your system for weight loss isn't as bad as its made out to be. That was the idea. In a way, I'm testing myself to see how much I can endure. And really - its not difficult.

My only problem is sliding backwards.

Thanks again everyone - I'm going to try the FitDay calorie counter. Hmm seems like I'm eating less than a thousand calories.

ncuneo - wow your journey is amazing. :eek:

kaplods
02-10-2011, 05:47 PM
Heather, when you say "needs calories to carry you through the day" are you talking about having low energy and stuff? Because honestly, when I'm doing a diet like this, I have MORE energy than I would when I eat a whole 3 meals a day. Could it be that my body is different?

I don't think your body is different, at least not different than mine, because what you're describing sounds very familiar to me. I've seen it in myself and in many of the posts of members here, but you need to see the bigger picture. The extra energy may actually be a warning sign. Crash dieting (most diets under 1,000 calories) stress the body to the point that endorphins are released. You can actually get an endorphin "high" from crash dieting - almost euphoric. That euphoria may feel good, but it isn't necessarily a good sign. It's also terribly addictive (if you get used to a diet-high, you don't want to diet without it, even knowing that it's a sign of damage, doesn't necessarily stop you from wanting that diet high).

I think it's the real reason so many popular diets start with a crash phase. The euphoria and rapid weight loss get you "hooked" on the diet. The diet plan creator may give other reasons (breaking craving/addictions, purifying or detoxing the body, providing a "jump start"...), but essentially that euphoria and instant gratification get you hooked.

Endorphins are the body's pain-killers, natural narcotics in response to stress and injury. The euphoria is masking the damage. You feel great because of those natural pain killers, but like prescription pain killers, they eventually wear off as you become used to them (or you need more and more to get the same rush).

It can be hard to break the crash diet addiction, because of those endorphins. I know that from experience. I was addicted to crash dieting because of that euphoria. I mistook the euphoria for high energy levels (mentally I felt amazing - almost high, but physically I was also dizzy and lightheaded - not a sign of high energy. In fact, I even passed out a few times, which is definitely not a sign of high energy, but I still felt "too good" to give up the crash dieting easily).

The biggest problem with endorphin release is that if you don't allow the body to heal, more and more endorphins are released, and you become more and more resistant to them - you have to starve yourself more and more extremely to get the same effects. If you were getting a rush from 1000 calories crash dieting, you'll eventually have to eat 500 to get the same effects, and eventually even starvation may not do it.

Starvation and crash dieting have many negative effects. Muscle loss was already mentioned (and as you lose muscle, you also slow metabolism, as muscle tisue burns more calories than fat), but there are other effects as well - hair loss, dry skin, organ damage (most dangerously the heart, because you can't choose which muscle is lost), and immune system problems (calorie restriction lowers your resistance to infection and illness. It's likely that the more you restrict calories, the greater the impact on immune function).

Rebound hunger is also a huge problem with crash dieting. If you do have a higher calorie day, or even a serving of a high carb/sugar food, it can trigger what I call "rabid" hunger. You go from feeling not hungry at all, to "I will die of starvation if I don't eat everything in sight."

I spent most of my life (from age 5 to at least 35) crash dieting, to the point that any weight loss under 5 lbs a week was discouraging enough to be demotivating. Dieting without the euphoria and dieting without the instant gratification of huge losses was pure misery. Even when I knew that crash dieting did more harm to me than good, I still couldn't give it up. I knew I needed to learn a different way, but the temptation of quick weight loss and endorphin euphoria were just too darned tempting "Just a few days," I'd tell myself "just to jump start."

I know that no one could tell me that I was making a mistake. I had to learn the hard way, and maybe you will too. I hope not, because I think some of the negative effects of crash dieting are long-lasting if not permanent (my metabolism is erroded to the point that I lose less than a pound per week on a calorie level that once resulted in regular weekly losses of 5 to 7 lbs).

It's incredibly hard to diet "sensibly" after you've habitually crashed dieted. No matter how much I lose, in the back of my mind, I'm comparing it to the 11 and 12 lb losses I experienced in the first week, and the 7-8 lbs on a regular basis on crash diets. I also miss the euphoric "I can do anything" feeling, but I know it's a fleeting and misleading feeling. It's not worth the inevitable "crash" that occurs when the euphoria dissipates (and it always does).

Good luck to you.

ncuneo
02-10-2011, 06:37 PM
My only problem is sliding backwards.

I think this is everyone's point - you can deprive yourself and lose weight all you want, but at some point you will snap and you will rebell. Some people can recover gracefully from that, others will go the opposite and gain back all they've lost and then some.

It's a marathon not a sprint and it's about persistance and consistancy.

Nola Celeste
02-10-2011, 06:49 PM
It sounds like your mind was already pretty much made up when you posted.

You say it's not difficult to test yourself to see how much you can endure, yet in the next sentence you say that your only problem is sliding backwards. To me, this is like saying, "It's not that difficult to endure hitting myself on the head with a hammer, my only problem is that eventually my arm gets too tired, so I just need more arm strength to keep at it!" The problem with the behavior isn't the lack of strength, it's with the "egad, why are you doing that to yourself when you don't have to!?" nature of extremely low calorie consumption (unless under a doctor's orders).

Sometimes it's best just...not to hit yourself in the head with that hammer, y'know? ;)

Forgive me if my post comes off a bit know-it-allish. I don't know much, but I DO know what it's like to push myself to dietary extremes, then eventually break from the strain of it and regain all I'd lost (and then some--which is how I got to 232 in the first place). I never thought it was difficult either, until I broke over and ate--and sooner or later, I always did.

I also know, thanks to spending a lot of time reading here, that there are healthier ways to lose weight that'll let me enjoy my life and my meals. It feels unbelievably good to free myself from the punishment via severe diet/craving/eat-fest/guilt/punishment cycle that got me to my high weight.

Eating super-low calories isn't a point of pride or a sign of superior will, it's a potentially dangerous behavior. Read through the maintainers' forums here; I don't think you'll find a single long-term maintainer who ate super-low-calorie over the long haul and has kept her weight off. Not one. That should tell you something about the success rate of the "hit yourself in the head with a hammer" method. ;)

seagirl
02-10-2011, 07:09 PM
Hello again,

John, exactly. I read somewhere that kick starting your system for weight loss isn't as bad as its made out to be. That was the idea. In a way, I'm testing myself to see how much I can endure. And really - its not difficult.

My only problem is sliding backwards.

Thanks again everyone - I'm going to try the FitDay calorie counter. Hmm seems like I'm eating less than a thousand calories.

ncuneo - wow your journey is amazing. :eek:

If this plan worked and was sustainable, you wouldn't slide backwards. You'd lose weight forever and you wouldn't be here.

You are here because something you are doing isn't working.

Check out the folks in the maintenance forum. My guess is not one of them will say "I lost all the weight by alternating deprivation and binging and I'm happy and healthy and can sustain this for life!"

Reasonable and slow and steady might not be sexy but it will get you where you want to go. I lose a pound a week on weight watchers. But in 8 months I'll be at my goal. Will you be still eating like this 8 months from now? A year from now?

Good luck.

30 Fat Still Awesome
02-10-2011, 08:00 PM
Kaplods, jebus that's one way to scare the heck out of someone. Yea, I don't want to go down that route - where I'm damaging myself.

Nola, no I'm on here for advice. I just told you guys what I'm doing right now. From the responses I've gotten thus far, its obvious that my calorie intake is too low. So I'll incorporate some other healthy things into my diet to be eating at least 1500 calories a day.

When I said I slide backwards - I meant that I go back to eating sweets and stuff. But amazingly, I don't really gain the weight back. The last time I did a 2 week diet, lost 10 lbs and went back to eating junk. I gained back a total of 2 lbs of the 10 that I lost in 3 months of regular eating habits.

I hope I don't come across as closed off or unwilling to take advice, trust me, that's not the case.

I hear you seagirl - thanks.

Thanks again for helping me out all of you.

Next question - is it okay to weigh myself only once a week? I find that weighing myself every single day discourages me, especially if the needle doesn't move at all. Thanks!

bargoo
02-10-2011, 08:15 PM
It is OK to weigh yourself once a week, many people prefer to this so as not to see the normal fluctuations. Weighing yourself every day and to some several times a day causes a lot of confusion and anxiety.

Nola Celeste
02-10-2011, 09:09 PM
Nah, I don't think you came off as unwilling, just in search of some more convincing. And I hope I didn't come off as overbearing or snarky. If I did, I blame the fact that it took me decades to realize what I was doing to myself with diets that cut my calories to the bone or eliminated food groups (works for some, not for me). I wanted to be emphatic about just how rotten it is for your body and your psyche in the long term to go so low. If I came off rough in the process, I'm sorry. I'm usually only a jerk in traffic. :D

I honestly believe I dieted myself to 232 pounds and wonder what size I would've been if I'd attempted moderation from the beginning. The one moderate plan I ever did, I lost 70 pounds and kept it off for four years...you'd think I'd have remembered what I learned from that experience. Nope, I've had to re-learn it. Reading posts here has helped a ton with that. :)

As for weighing yourself, anything goes. Some people on here weigh monthly. Others weigh in daily. Plenty go for the once-a-week weigh-in. I used to do weekly weigh-ins, but I went to daily precisely because I wanted to get used to the discomfort of seeing the same or even--horrors--a higher number on the scale.

It IS discouraging if you look only at weight loss as success, but (and I learned this from Kaplods) if you begin to see just maintaining a loss as a victory and as an important lesson, you'll find that you don't get discouraged. (Frustrated? Yeah, sometimes, but not discouraged enough to go off the plan.)

Daily weighing means getting used to what your body's doing. Ate a few salty pickles? There they are on the scale the next day as water weight. Had a good workout that left your arms sore? Yep, the scale agrees, you worked out hard and gained two pounds of fluid as your muscles rebuild. The scale's just a tool; it doesn't tell you how much fat you lost, just how the earth's gravity is affecting you that day.

On an entirely different subject, your avatar image is lovely. :)

30 Fat Still Awesome
02-10-2011, 09:26 PM
Nola, it's okay I'm a jerk sometimes too and think I'm right a lot of the time (u'd think I'd stop after being proven wrong so many times).

How do you keep water weight into check? Especially for the days that I'm going to be weighing in. Yea, sometimes in the past I've not lost weight, but have seen my pants get a little looser - so somethings working.

Thanks for the advice. Ps: I know huh, excellent eye makeup!

Nola Celeste
02-10-2011, 09:42 PM
I just don't worry about water weight. I mean, I would if I were walking the red carpet at the Oscars or something, but on a day to day basis in my not-very-glamorous life? Nah, it doesn't really bother me if I'm carrying extra fluid as long as I know what's caused it.

If it goes on for a couple of days and makes my rings tight or if I have a special occasion for which I want to look my smallest, I'll generally up my water intake, skip extra-salty stuff, and lay off my free weights for a couple of days beforehand.

Mostly I just ignore it as long as my measurements are still going down overall--and they have been, so it's all good. :)

30 Fat Still Awesome
02-11-2011, 12:16 AM
Today's calorie intake 1171.. see I'm paying attention dudes. =)

Heather
02-11-2011, 12:26 AM
We are mostly water. Seriously, most of our weight is water that we can't worry about getting rid of the water weight. Weigh once a week, know that there will be fluctuations up and down, and keep your eye on the big picture!

I hope you're getting what you need here!