Weight Loss Support - Diet and exercise do work... if you are honest!




southernbelle102
02-08-2011, 02:13 AM
Something that has been bothering me lately is that a lot of people, when they ask me how I have lost the weight, seem bothered by the fact that I don't have a quick fix answer for them. A lot of them say that diet and exercise just don't work for them. This really bothers me because diet and exercise works for EVERYONE (unless you have a medical condition that makes it not work for you). If someone thinks that they are staying within their allotted calories for the day and they still can't lose anything then they really need to examine whether or not they are counting every calorie they consume. You can't just take bites here and there without counting them. That kind of cheating will completely sabotage your weight loss. If someone sticks to 1200-1600 calories a day and honestly only eats that amount... even without much exercise... they WILL lose. I am just tired of the excuses, I guess...


Linsy
02-08-2011, 02:26 AM
First of all, congratulations on your weight loss. You're doing incredible and 120+ pounds lost is amazing! People should definitely listen to you if they're asking for diet tips.

I've lost my first 50lbs even without exercise. Weight loss is not only possible for most people it really isn't that difficult. Everything is a choice--cheeseburger and fries or chicken and veggies? Ice cream or yogurt? Coke or water? It's just about choosing the right thing and continuing to do so even if you slip up. Like you said, people who say it doesn't work for them probably made a common mistake like eating better but still overeating or not counting a cookie or two in the evening, which does a lot of damage.

Rosinante
02-08-2011, 02:28 AM
I disappoint people too. The dental receptionists yesterday said
1. You've lost more weight, haven't you?
Ans: Yes. thankyou for noticing.
2. How much have you lost?
Ans: About 80lbs.
3. What's that? (maths calcs going on)
Ans: About 5 stone 10lbs.
4. So How are you doing it?
Ans: Eating less and moving more.
5. ????????

It was kind of them to comment but they were so weirded that it wasn't a fancy-named plan.

Obviously, there are people whose health conditions mean it's not that easy but for me, 100% (less food) + (more exercise) works every single time. (Memo to self: so DO IT!)


Mmckellen
02-08-2011, 06:33 AM
Thank you for posting this.

kaw
02-08-2011, 06:37 AM
Dieting brings out a variant of the Lake Woebegone effect: everyone has a slower metabolism than average.

joyfulloser
02-08-2011, 07:02 AM
Here...here!!!:D Stop the EXCUSES!!! Arrrrggghh!:mad:

Thank you for posting this!:D

Shmead
02-08-2011, 07:21 AM
It only bothers me when people have to explain why they can't do it: "I envy you, my kids keep me too busy". We all have 24 hours in a day. If you have things that are more important to you than losing weight, that's fine--that may well be the best possible choice--but I make real sacrifices to find the time.

Even worse that that are the people that use "I have no time to exercise" as an excuse to eat whatever they want. It's comforting to believe that exercise is everything, because then when you can't exercise, you can eat pizza. When people get really fixated on my exercise habits, I set them straight--yes, I exercise a lot, but the impact is tiny compared to my diet.

Hopeful8
02-08-2011, 08:33 AM
The reaction I find amusing is that they're absolutely shocked that it was diet and exercise and not some pill/powder/surgery/magic wand.

It's like diet and exercise was the last thing that they were expecting to hear.

Asherdoodles87
02-08-2011, 08:35 AM
You do make a good point, losing weight is really simple calories in vs. calories out. However, it can be more difficult to lose the weight if you have an emotional attachment to food, or do not want to give up certain foods. I think that is why some people find it hard to "diet" and eat a certain amount of calories. I have trouble staying in my calorie range because a lot losing weight for me is psychological. It is not just the actual process of eating less and exercising.

I had my cousin tell me that she wasn't losing weight and had been trying for months. She was eating way too many calories when I asked her about her foods. I think there needs to be more education on weight loss released to the general public.

Slim CB
02-08-2011, 08:39 AM
So so true!!! I have 2 friends who started out on this journey with me in May. Sad to say, I am the only one who has been successful because I am the only one who stuck with it. They continually ask me what else am I doing - my answer is always (to their disappointment) eat less and move more.

I worked damn hard for this, this was not done by some magic pill!!

Tomato
02-08-2011, 08:58 AM
Congrats on your weight loss - fantastic!!!

I have to say that nobody told me that diet and exercise doesn't work for them; but I was asked how I lost the weight, my answer was "Exercise". I am not really dieting - I am simply not stuffing my face with pizza and burgers and what not. Also, I am not counting calories.
But, my co-workers or whoever asked me, very excitedly, how I lost the weight all put on a VERY disappointed face when I said it was exercise. They ALL hoped for some miraculous method, something painless that does not involve getting the body off the couch and a strong willpower. :-)

FitGirlyGirl
02-08-2011, 09:03 AM
I have had people, including one at the gym yesterday, just walk away in the middle of my answering them when they realize that my answer isn't some magic something they can use for a quick, easy fix. They ask me about my body bugg all the time and they get all excited. I explain to them that it counts the calories I burn and I count the calories I eat and they get all deflated. What? Did you think it was sitting there sucking all the fat out of me through my arm? If only it could be so easy! Silly people!

Eliana
02-08-2011, 09:06 AM
Sadly, I know this now, but you couldn't have told me this a year ago. :no: And I'd have argued with you too. What a different response I'd have posted a year ago.

A year ago I'd have said: But I do exercise, and I do so like a mad woman. I hit the gym 6 days a week, sometimes three hours at a time. And I follow South Beach without even one cheat. I am ridiculously honest with myself and still the weight does not come off. I am broken.

Today I can say: It's about persistence as much as it is about being on plan. Being really strict is great, but it must be sustainable. If you're going to go all out, that's fine, but you have to keep up with it and give it time because stalls happen to everyone. It wasn't that the weight wasn't coming off, it was that the weight wasn't coming off fast enough for me, especially when I compared myself to others.

So yep...given time, diet and exercise works and I now believe it can work for anyone with an exception rate of only maybe 1%.

sept15lija
02-08-2011, 09:19 AM
The nurse at the doctor's office asked me the other day how I had done it, and I told her counting calories and working on being more active. She said, "oh weight watchers?" and I said no, just on my own...and she just kind of looked at me and said "people don't just do that". I know she knows it's possible, but large weight loss is rare. I agree with you - I find the equation fairly simple...but I do believe you need to be READY to make the change in your life. I wish I could tell people how to make the mental switch, because I do believe that's the key.

berryblondeboys
02-08-2011, 09:36 AM
I agree with you - I find the equation fairly simple...but I do believe you need to be READY to make the change in your life. I wish I could tell people how to make the mental switch, because I do believe that's the key.

It's that mental switch that people aren't willing to do. I wasn't ready for YEARS. What? Give up eating whatever I want, whenever I want and pick up moving around, on purpose? It's easy to just live day to day without turning on the brain. Without feeling the problems it's creating. Avoiding the doctor's office just because you don't want to know!

Switching the mental key is the hard part. Being ready to make a lifestyle change is extremely difficult. ANYONE can lose 10 pounds or 20-30 pounds, but how many can maintain that loss? Obviously most do not, otherwise there wouldn't be a term such as 'weight loss industry'.

I even ask myself and look around at others here - how many will still be here a year from now? I sure plan to be and believe I will be, but don't we all plan to take it off and KEEP it off?

What are the percentages anyway? How many people actually keep it off for at least 2 years? How about 5? 10? Life?

Eliana
02-08-2011, 09:41 AM
What are the percentages anyway? How many people actually keep it off for at least 2 years? How about 5? 10? Life?

Mmm, the grim statistic is 5%. ;) But there's no reason you can't be part of that 5%. And from my experience here over the past year, I'd say 5% of new posters stick around as well.

This is why my most important goal for myself was to stick with it for one year. Just one year. I wanted to be that person that posted a one year anniversary thread. :D

berryblondeboys
02-08-2011, 09:56 AM
Mmm, the grim statistic is 5%. ;) But there's no reason you can't be part of that 5%. And from my experience here over the past year, I'd say 5% of new posters stick around as well.

This is why my most important goal for myself was to stick with it for one year. Just one year. I wanted to be that person that posted a one year anniversary thread. :D


But I wonder how many keep 'most' of it off? Are there statistics for that? So, let's say, someone comes on here and starts at 200 and wants to get to 120. They get there, but it's extremely hard work to maintain it, but they can maintain 135 (a far cry better than 200). To me that is still a huge success, but it probably doesn't count in statistics of who kept it off?

My end goal is 175 which is 10-20 pounds over my 'ideal' for my height and frame. I'll see when I get there if I can get lower or if I want to, but if I get to 155 (very hard to believe I could), but if I did... I will NOT beat myself up if I end up settling at 175 as it's FAR better than where I was.

ncuneo
02-08-2011, 10:11 AM
That's a good attitude berry, but give yourself a little more credit. I think the statistic is that 95% of people who lose weight regain it in 5 years. But I'm sorry, you know why they regain it...because at some point they stop doing what they know works - diet and execise. The others regain because the choose a fad diet or an unsustainable diet or had no maintenance plan.

I guess my biggest issue is that when people know this to be true, don't do it and still b*tch about it. My mom is the classic yo yo dieter, she's at her heaviest again and b*tching and moaning about it and she's knows what to do, she's just not doing.

Now I know this is easier said than done at times, trust me I KNOW, I have an undiagnosed binge eating disorder and a very unhealthy relationship with food. But no matter how much I want to stuff my face, I want this body more. You have to WANT it more than anything.

Larry H
02-08-2011, 10:21 AM
Dieting brings out a variant of the Lake Woebegone effect: everyone has a slower metabolism than average.

Love it!! Made me laugh:D

Everyone is looking for the magic secret to weight loss.

The real secret is I have to change the six inch space between my ears. That grey matter up there. My brain thought process lies to me and says one more bite won't hurt. My mind has been out to get me for too long.

It's simple, if energy taken in (calories) is more than energy spent (calories) I gain weight. Reverse this and I lose weight. The choice is mine. :carrot:

Larry,
-----------------
If we're not willing to settle for junk living, we certainly shouldn't settle for junk food. ~Sally Edwards

pnkrckpixikat
02-08-2011, 12:20 PM
One thing to keep in mind about the 95% statistic... Of the 100% that got to goal what % of them were big losers? I' think that those of us with the strength of will to lose large amounts of weight are way more likely to keep a good portion of it off. Compared to alot of the vanity dieters who do it to lose that 10 or 20 pounds. Its alot easier to put back on 10 or 20 pounds then 100+ especially when those of us that manage to lose alot of weight spent months or years learning about our bodies, changing our attitudes about food and being stubborn enough to stick to some sort of plan.

I would think that just having the strength of will to lose large amounts of weight makes a person more likely to beable to keep most of it off.

mandalinn82
02-08-2011, 12:26 PM
But I wonder how many keep 'most' of it off? Are there statistics for that? So, let's say, someone comes on here and starts at 200 and wants to get to 120. They get there, but it's extremely hard work to maintain it, but they can maintain 135 (a far cry better than 200). To me that is still a huge success, but it probably doesn't count in statistics of who kept it off?

Most of the studies I've seen (for example, the official weight watchers studies and etc) define "success" as maintaining at least 10-20% of the amount lost after 3 years. The statistics DO count those who are maintaining the majority of a large weight loss, unfortunately. But I don't let them get to me. I'm not a statistic (and I just passed 3 years of maintenance, the length of time for a good number of these studies, so hooray)

berryblondeboys
02-08-2011, 12:42 PM
One thing to keep in mind about the 95% statistic... Of the 100% that got to goal what % of them were big losers? I' think that those of us with the strength of will to lose large amounts of weight are way more likely to keep a good portion of it off. Compared to alot of the vanity dieters who do it to lose that 10 or 20 pounds. Its alot easier to put back on 10 or 20 pounds then 100+ especially when those of us that manage to lose alot of weight spent months or years learning about our bodies, changing our attitudes about food and being stubborn enough to stick to some sort of plan.

I would think that just having the strength of will to lose large amounts of weight makes a person more likely to beable to keep most of it off.

I don't know I lost 50 before and then gained 90 in 5 years! I've watched Oprah go up and down tons of weight too. But maybe it is higher for those with very large weight losses, but then, how many people ever MAKE it to very large weight losses?

berryblondeboys
02-08-2011, 12:48 PM
Most of the studies I've seen (for example, the official weight watchers studies and etc) define "success" as maintaining at least 10-20% of the amount lost after 3 years. The statistics DO count those who are maintaining the majority of a large weight loss, unfortunately. But I don't let them get to me. I'm not a statistic (and I just passed 3 years of maintenance, the length of time for a good number of these studies, so hooray)

That is amazing! and Yay you!!!!! It's hard for me to even imagine being at that point - looking back, but I'm working on it!

pnkrckpixikat
02-08-2011, 01:16 PM
Thats my point berry, of the 100% of overall dieters who get to their goal are people who had large amounts to lose, i would imagine that, statistically, as the amount of weight lost increases the likelyhood of regaining a large chunk of it would decrease... Im not saying losing 10, 20, or even 50 pounds is easy, its always a struggle. But i would think that someone who found the strength to stay on plan, sometimes for years, to lose 100, 150, or more would be less likely to let themselves regain it.

Yes it will still happen, but i think it would be less likely.

ncuneo
02-08-2011, 01:24 PM
^gosh I don't know I see story after story on 3FC of people who lose 100+ and regain, but again their story is always the same - I, for whatever reason, returned to my old habits.

Personally though I'm hoping having gone through the struggle of losing 130 lbs, and being hyper sensitive to any scale increases and continued activity on 3FC will insure my success as a maintainer.

berryblondeboys
02-08-2011, 01:30 PM
^^^^
I tend to agree. Some people just little by little lose focus. Like, they got busy one week and no exercise, then someone brought in donuts, and so on. Very soon all those good habits that were so hardly won, disappear. Or, maybe for a month they weren't being very good and it didn't hurt them, so they relax a bit... next thing they know, the two months later, they've gained 20 lbs and so on.

I know for myself, I just stopped stepping on the scale. Stopped paying attention to what was going in my mouth. I was in denial and by the time I realized it, all 50 were back on and I was still piling it on.

astrophe
02-08-2011, 01:42 PM
I know I lost all focus. I had my high risk pregnancy and emergency c-sect kid, and then that whole infancy-toddler-preschooler stage sucked up time and changed the rules of my Life!

But I'll plonk on the side with food log + fitness works.

I DO have endocrine wacky (PCOS, hypotyroid, etc) that makes my metabolism slow as ****. So what? It's moving again. Took a while and fussing at my doc and checking labs and meds but it's moving again. The problem was finding where my AMR really is because those guesstimating equations online aren't quite a good guess for my conditions. But approximate AMR has been found, and I can work backward from there, and tada! Food log is finally matching the actual weight loss. I can work that scene like nobody's business. I'm an old hand at exchanges. Tell me the AMR, I'll find the right exchanges pattern. Sold!

And child is older -- I don't have to struggle with extended breastfeeding schedules or baby naps or annoying gym daycare time slots limiting my access... she's in school and I can just get to it any time during school hours and have some degree of flexibility.

I never did figure out how to do it with a wee tot and I have a lot of sympathy for those in that stage of life.

But I knew how to do it without a tot (working the food log + fitness thing) because I'd come within 20 lbs of goal when I was a single gal with a BF.

And while I may never know how to work it as a married mom with a baby and DH...

I know I can get back there again as a married mom with a kid and a DH.

Sometimes having patience and willing to give it whatever time it takes is part of it. But the bottom line -- food log and fitness still holds.

A.

synger
02-08-2011, 02:17 PM
Dieting brings out a variant of the Lake Woebegone effect: everyone has a slower metabolism than average.

That's so true! There's always SOME excuse

synger
02-08-2011, 02:21 PM
The "95% of dieters will regain" statistic is shaky, at best. It comes from ONE study in the 50s of 100 dieters, who were given a printed diet and sent home. No training, no followup, no support network... None of the things that we now know are SOOOO important for any sort of lifestyle change.

http://dietchoices.com/diet-plans/diets-dont-work/

http://partners.nytimes.com/library/national/science/052599hth-weight-myth.html

So cheer up! There is definitely hope. Even if we are destined to be statistics, it's a bigger statistic than 5%!!

ncuneo
02-08-2011, 02:35 PM
I hate hearing storied that were pregnancy/child related. As you can see from my siggy, I'm one too, but I plan on TTC #2 late this year or sometime next year and I am terrified of the weight gain. I hope to just continue my maintenance plan with some minor adjustments, but the break I'll have to take from exercise and possibly food preparation will be difficult. I'll likely have another c-section and won't be able to run for a minimum of 8 wks not to mention if I can keep it up during the pregnancy in the first place.

My plan will require great attention and tweaking, but it has to be done if I want to keep the gain in check, it HAS to be a priority, HAS to be. That's the problem, people stop making it a priority.

nickyj
02-08-2011, 02:43 PM
Man oh man I feel ya guys on this. Its so true, people just want to hear that you took this or did that, and poof, the weight feel off. from now on, when people ask what I did, I'll tell them I eat five pizzas a day, extra greasy, with five 2 liters of regular pop Weight comes off like magic.

Sunshine73
02-08-2011, 03:11 PM
This really bothers me because diet and exercise works for EVERYONE (unless you have a medical condition that makes it not work for you). If someone thinks that they are staying within their allotted calories for the day and they still can't lose anything then they really need to examine whether or not they are counting every calorie they consume. You can't just take bites here and there without counting them. That kind of cheating will completely sabotage your weight loss. If someone sticks to 1200-1600 calories a day and honestly only eats that amount... even without much exercise... they WILL lose. I am just tired of the excuses, I guess...

I agree that diet and exercise works for everyone but I respectfully disagree that eating 1200 - 1600 calories a day will create a weight loss in everyone. I've been living my life feeling like a failure because I can't lose weight on a 1200 calorie diet. I'm not being dishonest or "cheating" - although that's what everyone thinks - from friends, to family to doctors to annonymous strangers on the internet. If I'm not losing it's because I'm cheating. It's because I'm not being honest and I'm making excuses to prevent myself from being accountable for my actions.

Heck, I even began to believe it myself. I started thinking that I must be unintentionally screwing myself up - so I tightened the reigns on my eating even further until I was afraid to eat anything at all because I was sure that ANYTHING I ate was going to result in a "cheat" and a resulting weight gain.

What I learned is that by keeping my calories at or about 800 calories a day my body does kick in and start shedding the pounds. It's not an excuse, it's not dishonest, it's just a fact of my life. Weight loss is a simple formula of calories in vs. calories burned right? But that formula is not an exact science. According to the "formulas" for calculating BMR I should be able to easily consume 1500 calories and drop weight. Heck, I know people my size who do without problem but I'm not one of those people.

So I struggle. I struggle with keeping my calorie count low enough to lose weight but high enough to maintain a decent quality of life (I can get VERY cranking on only 800 calories a day). I struggle with people thinking I'm cheating, lying or too lazy to actually put in the work. I struggle with the fact that my body betrays me by either simply not working well OR by working too well when it comes to processing calories.

sacha
02-08-2011, 03:36 PM
I maintained for 7 years now with one pregnancy break (now back to PP weight give or take 5lbs after 6 months).

It has always ALWAYS been a priority. It has always been my accepted new lifestyle. There is no going back. That girl who went through the drive-thru 3x a day or went out to restaurants with friends each night is gone, dead, 6 feet under :D There's a new one in her place :p

Meg
02-08-2011, 03:48 PM
Being hypothyroid, I always used that as my excuse for why I couldn't lose weight. After all, I had a genuine medical problem that affected my metabolism, so what reasonable person could expect me to lose weight?

Well, my doctor expected me to lose weight, that's who. Every time I whined to her about being hypothyroid and being fat, she was totally unsympathetic. She told me that if my thyroid was medicated to be in the normal range, then I could lose weight like a normal person. I used to get so angry at her! She just didn't understand how hard it was to lose weight (pass the cookies, please).

But -- she was right.

When I dropped all the excuses and decided I would not fail this time, that this was the LAST diet I would ever go on ... it worked. In fact, I lost all my excess weight (122 pounds) in a little less than a year, which some people might think is pretty fast. My metabolism turned out to work pretty darn well, after all! :o

Calorie counting + cardio + weightlifting + constant vigilance. It worked to lose the weight and amazingly, it's worked for almost nine years to keep the weight off. Even after menopause -- another great excuse! -- and with being hypothyroid. Wish I figured this out about 20 years ago, when I was so busy feeling sorry for myself!

berryblondeboys
02-08-2011, 04:36 PM
I hate hearing storied that were pregnancy/child related. As you can see from my siggy, I'm one too, but I plan on TTC #2 late this year or sometime next year and I am terrified of the weight gain. I hope to just continue my maintenance plan with some minor adjustments, but the break I'll have to take from exercise and possibly food preparation will be difficult. I'll likely have another c-section and won't be able to run for a minimum of 8 wks not to mention if I can keep it up during the pregnancy in the first place.

My plan will require great attention and tweaking, but it has to be done if I want to keep the gain in check, it HAS to be a priority, HAS to be. That's the problem, people stop making it a priority.

You'll be fine if you have a good support system in place and you make yourself a priority. I didn't. I had a special needs baby, my husband was working long hours, my other son needed attention too and well, I came dead last for everything and I allowed it.

A lot of it has to do with getting enough sleep too. If you can get that, it will be a lot easier. At least for me, no sleep, means bad decisions.

But yes, it is MUCH easier with the kids being older. Mine are now 14 and 5 (nearing 6) AND I stay at home (for now). I have no excuse not to get this weight off NOW.

M0vingon
02-08-2011, 05:17 PM
I have to say that in all honesty, we (as a society) are brainwashed into thinking that the magic pill exists. Sad but true, the weight loss industry has the majority of people convinced that they can't do it on their own.
I think that's why people get the glazed stare when informed that you lost weight with (common sense) counting calories and exercise. Maybe it's shock??
People think that it has to be the new-fangled diet plan or piece of workout equipment creating success. It's kind of sad, really, because it's a totally dis-empowering state of mind.

MzJuicyD
02-08-2011, 05:47 PM
people just want to lose weight without any hard work. Its really annoying. A coworker got a little upset with me because she said she was going to spend A LOT of money doing this program where you eat steamed veggies and drink their smoothies. BUT she was hessitant to pay $29 a month to join the gym! I basically told her that she was wasting her time because you can learn how to eat well for free. PLUS, the moment she starts eating regular food again she will blow back up. I just dont understand people lol

southernbelle102
02-08-2011, 05:51 PM
I agree that diet and exercise works for everyone but I respectfully disagree that eating 1200 - 1600 calories a day will create a weight loss in everyone. I've been living my life feeling like a failure because I can't lose weight on a 1200 calorie diet. I'm not being dishonest or "cheating" - although that's what everyone thinks - from friends, to family to doctors to annonymous strangers on the internet. If I'm not losing it's because I'm cheating. It's because I'm not being honest and I'm making excuses to prevent myself from being accountable for my actions.

Heck, I even began to believe it myself. I started thinking that I must be unintentionally screwing myself up - so I tightened the reigns on my eating even further until I was afraid to eat anything at all because I was sure that ANYTHING I ate was going to result in a "cheat" and a resulting weight gain.

What I learned is that by keeping my calories at or about 800 calories a day my body does kick in and start shedding the pounds. It's not an excuse, it's not dishonest, it's just a fact of my life. Weight loss is a simple formula of calories in vs. calories burned right? But that formula is not an exact science. According to the "formulas" for calculating BMR I should be able to easily consume 1500 calories and drop weight. Heck, I know people my size who do without problem but I'm not one of those people.

So I struggle. I struggle with keeping my calorie count low enough to lose weight but high enough to maintain a decent quality of life (I can get VERY cranking on only 800 calories a day). I struggle with people thinking I'm cheating, lying or too lazy to actually put in the work. I struggle with the fact that my body betrays me by either simply not working well OR by working too well when it comes to processing calories.

Have you been checked out by your doctor for some medical reason why you are not losing on at least 1200 calories? Eating 800 calories is not only not healthy, it is not a sustainable diet. You are loosing muscle mass on that # and it is totally understandable that you are cranky... 800 cals is not enough. Honestly, if you do not have any medical reasons like diabetes, hypothyroidism, PCOS etc, there is really no way that your body wouldn't eventually loose a good bit on at least 1200 calories... especially with the calorie deficit that is created by your current weight. If you are dealing with one of those diseases or another, then you should probably work with a health care professional to get on a plan that will work without dropping your calories to an unhealthy level. (it may be low carb or something like that) Also, it takes time to lose weight. You may not drop weight every day, or even every week on a set # of calories... even if you have created a big enough deficit. We deal with other things like water weight affecting the scale. Please don't take this response with offense, it is definitely not meant that way. I am just worried that you feel you need to cut your calories to such an unhealthy level to lose. Please get yourself checked out. If they find that there is a medical reason and can treat it, it could make your journey s much easier! :) Good luck!

ps. there is no magic calorie intake # for every person and not everyone will lose the same on 1200-1600. However, 1200 should be the lowest you go...

niafabo
02-08-2011, 06:31 PM
I hate when people give you that look like you're lying when you tell them it's just diet and exercise. Like you have some secret method you don't want anyone to know about. I mean seriously what do you think I did.

I also hate how even though I have lost over 50 pounds people just assume I'm not in good shape. They see the fat I still have on me and give me advice on what to do. Like my arms are still very large and my sister told me that I need to do tricep work. I explained to her I have a lot of muscle in my arms and I lift weights regularly and that it's the fat left on my arms that makes them appear that way but it fell on deaf ears.

Sometimes I just wanna scream at people I am doing things the right way and I'm getting results. Sorry if that is incomprehensable to you!

Eliana
02-08-2011, 07:43 PM
I also hate how even though I have lost over 50 pounds people just assume I'm not in good shape. They see the fat I still have on me and give me advice on what to do. Like my arms are still very large and my sister told me that I need to do tricep work. I explained to her I have a lot of muscle in my arms and I lift weights regularly and that it's the fat left on my arms that makes them appear that way but it fell on deaf ears.

Oh, this used to be my biggest beef!! I was such a harder worker! I was so the opposite of lazy! Honestly, I don't know too many fat people who are lazy. It is not always, or maybe even often, about sitting on the couch all day. I always said I was the fittest fat person out there.

I am so, so glad my exterior now matches the work I put into it. It's really hard to put in more effort at the gym than the tiny person next to you, but she's the one who gets to wear the size 6.

Horo
02-08-2011, 08:22 PM
The only thing that bothers me about other people making excuses for themselves is when they shrug off the hard work and results of everyone who has put in the grueling effort via diet and exercise to lose weight in doing so. I mean, people can tell themselves and do whatever they want- it's their own body and they don't have to do anything about excess weight if they don't want to, and even if they do, it's perfectly understandable that it takes some time for many to get into the right place to take action. But I see a lot of people undermine the efforts of all those who have found success in hard work for the sake of their own excuses, and I think it's really rude to say the least. :(

A prime example of what I mean was when I witnessed a girl complaining online about being obese and how she wanted to lose weight. Another person suggested in the politest way possible that she should consider monitoring her calorie intake vs. output as a means to do that. The girl proceeded to tear the other person a new one, saying that diet and exercise doesn't work and that she tried for less than a week to monitor her calories, she didn't do it seriously and gave up because she didn't see any change. She then went on to say that because she was active, controlling her diet wasn't necessary and that she- and most other obese people- are that way because they're supposed to be, and that people who have lost weight by restricting calorie input vs. output saw results only because they were "genetically blessed" and "lucky". :mad:

Shrinkmfs
02-16-2011, 11:21 AM
I love the posts about how people are shocked and saddened that we lost weight through diet and exercise. The recurrent replies that dieting and exercise didn't work for them points out the psychological addiction to food that is so hard to break for so many. I always think that with any addiction, until and if I get honest with myself nothing will change. When I have overeaten in the past, I would actually lie to myself about what I consumed in a binge-so of course I would not admit that to anyone else. Now that I have become so much more accountable I am feeling so much more in control and on top of things-and yes, the pounds are coming off.

Started at 172-down to 148-gradually: through low carbing , cal. counting and alot of exercise and support from this board.

Porthardygurl
02-16-2011, 12:39 PM
Okay lets face it. There are a lot of discouraged people out there in the world. And yes, we are bombarded, not only with pictures of thin thin people in magazines and celebrities and magazines that claim "lose weight with such and such a pill" and the latest indoresed celeb diet, but all the pills, all the pressure to be thin in society..Its not helping people out there have an understanding of helping themselves. People in the diet industry claim to help people by teaching them all about diet..but how many diets are out there? Many..and how many of them are un-healthy or radically extreme? Many..And how many people do you know will go to a place for help in which the people arent even trained to give advice OR have had no previous experience of being overweight or obese prior to helping people..See.. its like it takes one to know one. I used to be a finatic in believing that weight would just melt off me if i sat on my bum and followed this diet or that diet. I have a friend or two of mine looking at me and they are rather impressed that for 3 weeks i have been on the "South Beach Diet"...to them its just a diet, and it will last maybe a few more weeks..but to me.. i choose to, and have to for my health, look at it and embrace it as a lifestyle..If its a diet.. i can just jump on and off of it and i can make every excuse to stop exercising and i can cheat one or two days and then jump back on and that just isnt true..AND yes its still about calorie in vs calorie out..The person who said that and told you that in school was in fact right..But that point has become so muddled up in society..We look at carb counting or south beach as "low carb" but its not about "low carb" its about types of carbs..or weight watchers..its about the types of calories...or the zone..its the balance of different types of calories..Its all calories, its just the type you eat, the portion you eat, and then the exercise that you put out or the amount of work your body does in a day to burn it..and that message has been completely disguized as "such and such a diet"...And am i ever sick of people saying to kids in school "Eat according to the food pyramid"..Did you know that the food pyramid is based on agricultural and ecenomic stability? Same thing as the whole "Milk is good for you, you lose weight..and then Milk is bad for you, it makes you gain weight" Or soy is good, soy is bad..You get these two totally different messages and its because its not based on health, its based on how the economy is doing..SO how bout people just simply tell the truth and say ..its calories in and calories out..If you want to eat 900 calories at mcd's go for it, but thats 900 calories your body has to burn off after.

caryesings
02-16-2011, 04:45 PM
And am i ever sick of people saying to kids in school "Eat according to the food pyramid"..Did you know that the food pyramid is based on agricultural and ecenomic stability? .

I lost my weight using the Food Pyramid. It's quite the fashion to trash it, but there is a lot of sound science behind it and by tracking at mypyramidtracker.gov I not only lost the weight, but by eating the balance of nutrients recommended (% of protein/carbs/fat/saturated fat, fiber, etc) I have amazing lab numbers compared to 2 years ago.

Kills me when people would rather pay for a program then to try eating a balanced diet that your tax dollars have already paid for. And it's fun because you earn smiley faces when you get your nutrient balances right!

beerab
02-16-2011, 06:25 PM
I have had people, including one at the gym yesterday, just walk away in the middle of my answering them when they realize that my answer isn't some magic something they can use for a quick, easy fix. They ask me about my body bugg all the time and they get all excited. I explain to them that it counts the calories I burn and I count the calories I eat and they get all deflated. What? Did you think it was sitting there sucking all the fat out of me through my arm? If only it could be so easy! Silly people!

HILARIOUS!

There is no one size fits all BUT I think the bottom line is if you aren't going to work hard to lose the weight it's not going to happen. So many people lie to themselves IMO when they say they "tried." Half the time trying seems to be starving themselves for 2 days then giving up and binging when they see the scale didn't move down 10+ lbs.

It took me a long time to figure out that I needed to work hard and stop lying to myself. Hopefully others figure it out and get on it too.

Natalia
02-16-2011, 07:31 PM
If I ate following the food pyramid I wouldn't be able to fit through the door. I am far too sensitive to grains to be able to lose weight taking in more than minimal amount.

That's what's so tricky about weight loss plans, wl advice etc. Everyones reality is different. Everyones perception is different... And we tend to believe that what works for us will work for everyone, or what failed us will fail everyone. There is no one answer and there never will be.

Each of us is our own experiment. We need to take an honest look at what didn't work and keep adapting it until it does. Then rinse and repeat, forever, no excuses :)