100 lb. Club - I have been thinking of a plan - need input




Larry H
01-24-2011, 11:15 AM
I am a calorie counter and a YO YO dieter. Basically I have always failed at making the transition from dieting to not dieting after reaching my goal.

This plan came into my brain and it may or may not be worth trying.

Step 1 look up and identify the daily calorie requirements for a person at your goal weight who is your gender, age, and activity level.

Step 2 Start right now eating at that calorie level. Because our calorie requirements are higher for the heavier weight we are at now we would start losing.

Step 3 When we reach our goal we do not have to change anything in our eating plan because we have been eating at this weight level since we started. Hence we do not have to switch from a diet plan for weight loss to a different diet plan for weight maintenance.

What do you think? Come on I have thick skin and can take it.

Larry,
----------------------
Though no-one can go back
and make a brand new start,
anyone can start from now
and make a brand new end.

~ Author Unknown ~


Michou
01-24-2011, 11:37 AM
Interesting concept, I just did some calculation to see how it could work or not according to my data.

I was 170 and my bmr for that is 1764 if I remove 500 for a pound a week it brings me down to 1274 and I was told to eat at the time 1200 a day.

If I calculate based on my target weight of 125 the bmr is 1519, the 300 calories difference a day will not give me a pound a week.

I feel it is best for me to continue loosing weight to stay for now at 1200 then when I reach my goal I have option to increase to 1519.

I do adjust according to how much I weight now which is 134 it is 1568 but decided not to go bellow 1200 but increase cardio instead to compensate.

I guess you will have to make some calculation and see if according to your weight it is feasible.

Trazey34
01-24-2011, 11:57 AM
I guess whatever works for you, works for you right? I know for myself, at 300 plus pounds, if I ate at 1200 cals i'd last a week LOL I started off at TWO THOUSAND calories and lost weight!!! gradually dropped down but never really went below 1500... but again, if something works for one it might not work for another!


bargoo
01-24-2011, 11:59 AM
I am a calorie counter and a YO YO dieter. Basically I have always failed at making the transition from dieting to not dieting after reaching my goal.

This plan came into my brain and it may or may not be worth trying.

Step 1 look up and identify the daily calorie requirements for a person at your goal weight who is your gender, age, and activity level.

Step 2 Start right now eating at that calorie level. Because our calorie requirements are higher for the heavier weight we are at now we would start losing.

Step 3 When we reach our goal we do not have to change anything in our eating plan because we have been eating at this weight level since we started. Hence we do not have to switch from a diet plan for weight loss to a different diet plan for weight maintenance.

What do you think? Come on I have thick skin and can take it.

Larry,
----------------------
Though no-one can go back
and make a brand new start,
anyone can start from now
and make a brand new end.

~ Author Unknown ~

Many people do exactly as you describe. It makes sense to me , I didn't do it because I didn't know about it. I don't want to start all over again so will not be testing it. I hope some of the members who do this will respond to your post.

kaw
01-24-2011, 12:13 PM
It depends on the gap between current and ideal weight. A 600-pound man who eventually wants to be 180 is going to run into problems by trying to eat maintenance calories for a 180 pound man. By contrast, a 200-pound man who wants to drop to 180 would be fine eating at maintenance for a 180-pound man.

This is why many people recommend dropping a percentage from maintenance calories, e.g., 10-20% for sustainable weight loss. It works out to the same absolute number of calories for our hypothetical 200 pound man (0.8*200=180), but is safer because it prevents people who have a lot of weight to lose from setting unrealistically low calorie targets.

//b. strong,
Kim

Nola Celeste
01-24-2011, 12:16 PM
That's pretty much how I arrived at my 1500-a-day calorie budget. It's worked out very well for me, but I also know that my actual calorie intake at or near my maintenance weight will probably be lower than what the calculator says.

Calculators don't take into account the fact that when I'm 150 pounds, I won't be someone who's always been 150 pounds, I'll be someone who's lost a bunch to get there--and that means I'll almost definitely have to drop my calories as I approach my goal. It's vastly easier to go from 1500 to 1300 than it is to go from 2500 or 3000 or whatever I used to eat to get to my starting weight to 1500, though, so it shouldn't be much of an issue.

I'm not the fastest loser in the bunch as my ticker will show (I started at the end of October), but I've also been able to stay with this in a way I hadn't been able to stay with any non-supervised plan before. I've broken my old "diet" record by at least two months already, and I don't feel deprived or punished; I could do this forever if need be.

So yes, count me as a vote for your plan because I'm having success with pretty much the same thing. :)