General chatter - Weird scale experience at doc's




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flippychick
12-02-2010, 09:54 AM
Has anyone ever experienced this??? I went to the doctor's yesterday and the medical assistant took me into a room (with an adjoining bathroom), asked me to get a urine sample and weigh myself, then left. It was a digital scale, so I weighed myself, then it shut off. She came back into the room, asked me my weight, then wrote it down. Huh? I have to wonder if people would lie or shave off a few pounds. I told her the truth, but I kept wondering if there was a way they can go back and check it! Lol!


MindiV
12-02-2010, 10:27 AM
Wow...seems odd to me. Never had that happen.

dewdrop1970
12-02-2010, 10:36 AM
Never had that happen to me either. I have had weird weigh ins at the doctor...their scale doesn't stay on a number, it jumps around.

I always feel like I'm on the Biggest Loser when I step on the scale...250,230,210,300...in fact I never know what they write down, unless I ask.

LOL


bargoo
12-02-2010, 11:07 AM
The nurse stands beside me and writes it down.

RoseRodent
12-02-2010, 11:29 AM
I'm unsure why your doctors are all so obsessed with weighing people! Unless it's a specific height and weight check-up (you get one each time you sign with a new doctor but never again) or something to do with blood pressure, diabetes, etc. you just don't get weighed at the doctor.

The hospital is different, they are taking BMI statistics but they come up with a variety of other bovine fecal excuses for why they are taking the measurement, and the excuses change every time you attend. I started refusing to be weighed, it was a long haul up the corridor and a giant hassle for me to be weighed (getting weighed from a wheelchair is appallingly hard going) and then I found out that *shock horror * I was fat. That's all they wanted to tell me. I know there must be some patients who genuinely don't realise, but they could save everyone a lot of time by just asking, I'd have told them my BMI, but all they say is come with me so you think it's your appointment and then you find you are trapped in a room where all they do is weigh and measure you.

Very strange, they won't even take our word for it on height never mind weight, and nobody has any great incentive to fib about their height! I can only imagine it's some kind of experiment in weight honesty (unlikely) or they just want to try to take the pressure off for people who don't attend the doctor at all because of their weight. My mum is one of those people, if there was any threat she'd be weighed she won't go at all, and better to have healthcare than no healthcare.

Like I asked the doctor at the last appointment, if you can't tell looking at me whether or not I'm obese what does my actual weight matter? If a 300lb woman goes into the doctor's office she's not got a great BMI, right? So does it matter if she's 300, 305 or 315? If you aren't giving an anaesthetic the minutiae of weight don't matter.

seagirl
12-02-2010, 11:37 AM
I once went in for an infected tick bite and they tried to weigh me. I declined. And usually I just say "can I tell you my weight" and then they write it down.

Shaving off a few pounds isn't going to matter.

JenMusic
12-02-2010, 12:35 PM
I'm unsure why your doctors are all so obsessed with weighing people! Unless it's a specific height and weight check-up (you get one each time you sign with a new doctor but never again) or something to do with blood pressure, diabetes, etc. you just don't get weighed at the doctor.


I've honestly never thought too much about this. I guess I just figured it was to prescribe correct dosages of meds? Wouldn't weight matter then? I know I was asked my weight the one time I got an antibiotic shot.

lauralyn
12-02-2010, 05:00 PM
I'm unsure why your doctors are all so obsessed with weighing people! Unless it's a specific height and weight check-up (you get one each time you sign with a new doctor but never again) or something to do with blood pressure, diabetes, etc. you just don't get weighed at the doctor.



One major reason is in case any medications are to be given and the dosage depends on the weight.

Weight is a reflection in part on our health and it is their responsibility to track all aspects of our health.

katkitten
12-02-2010, 06:09 PM
on rare occasions it would matter for a medication. Heparin shots and some iv abx require a weight for example. Besides that, medication dosages for children are weight based. Also, if you have kidney disease or certain heart conditions tracking your weight is important. Most of the time it is a totally pointless act and I have refused before.

vdander24
12-02-2010, 06:19 PM
I have NEVER been lucky enough to get that. My wonderful BF gets that, and we go to the same small Primary and have the same one assistant.
I don't think I get the pass because I am now diabetic officially, and our last discussion was me begging not to be on more meds (I take two, now) and promising I would lose weight. Since that argument in May, I lost about 20 lbs, and just enoug for him to give me a pass until January, to re-assess. I suppose it is a way for doctors to not upset patients with that uncomfortable chatter about an obvious subject.

MiZTaCCen
12-02-2010, 09:26 PM
Everytime I go in for a physical the doctor weights me, but thats the only time and someone is always doing it for me. I never have to do it myself. Maybe that one person was uncomfortable doing it? Maybe she's had bad experiences with it so she allows people to do it for themselves instead of dealing with them *****ing and complaining about it? Who knows...

chickybird
12-02-2010, 09:36 PM
Very rarely, the nurse will just take my word on what I weigh. Usually it's days that it's freezing and I don't want to peel off half my clothes to get an accurate weigh in. I'm at the dr. pretty often though because my students do a great job of getting me sick, so the dr. gets to see me weigh in pretty often.

WebRover
12-02-2010, 09:59 PM
If a 300lb woman goes into the doctor's office she's not got a great BMI, right? So does it matter if she's 300, 305 or 315?

They can probably also tell she's not 8 feet tall to make that a decent BMI. ;)

Now that you mention it, I've been weighed at under- normal- and over-weight. Dutifully written down, asked my height (which I was under-reporting since they stopped measuring that before I stopped growing apparently) and then never discussed. So you're right - what was the point?

NiteNicole
12-02-2010, 10:02 PM
The last time I went, they had the scale on the metric setting and the nurse covered it with her hand, turned it off, then wrote it down. Why? Is she trying to shield me from my fatness? Sister, I carry it around. I KNOW.

Linsy
12-02-2010, 10:51 PM
I don't really mind getting weighed. Sure I don't like someone seeing my weight, but I just do it and get over it and move on.

I was at the ER yesterday, and they took me in a room and asked me how much I weigh. I told them and they took my word for it. They were really busy though and mentioned that there was only one doctor working so they probably didn't want to go through the hassle.

I wonder what they would have done if I said I was 120lbs or something LOL. They probably would have looked at me like I was crazy and made me weigh.

saef
12-02-2010, 10:57 PM
I can't imagine weighing myself at my doctor's office, because he's got one of those old-fashioned scales with the sliding weight on it. I seem to have to stand perfectly still for the thing to stop vibrating enough for them to get a true reading.

just keep swimming
12-03-2010, 12:23 AM
saef, last time I went to the doctor, a couple of weeks ago, the nurse asked me to weigh myself using the sliding scale thing. I was like... how? It wouldn't stay still and I had to think too hard about how to read it. :lol:

RoseRodent
12-03-2010, 04:24 AM
One major reason is in case any medications are to be given and the dosage depends on the weight.

Unless you are getting an IV medication doses are almost never based on weight for adults, only children. Should you happen to get one of the 2 or 3 outpatient medicines where you weight matters, surely they can just weigh you at that point, rather than weigh you in advance just in case you turn out to have a need for an unexpected IV? :?:


Weight is a reflection in part on our health and it is their responsibility to track all aspects of our health.

Weight is perceived to be a good indicator of health, but it is not when used as a single measurement. My BMI was more when I was doing gymnastics but I was a smaller dress size. My blood pressure has always been too low, but as soon as I climb on the scales I get lectured about high blood pressure. I used to take sodium supplements to prevent me passing out due to low blood pressure and low sodium levels, but because I am heavy I am told to reduce my salt intake, they don't look.

Your weight is taken as too much of an overall measure of health, the presumption that if you are heavy you are unfit and don't work out. I did gymnastics classes several times a week, swimming, home workouts, loads of walking, but I ate chocolate when I got home so I wasn't skinny. Weight was a terrible measure of my health. When I had my accident I was laid up for weeks and lost a lot of muscle condition and took off 8lbs, and my doctor congratulated me on my loss even though my body fat went up.

If they are going to weigh you they must then go on to ask you more lifestyle questions before deciding that your weight means you are unhealthy, otherwise it's as useful an indication of health as your height.

LiannaKole
12-03-2010, 05:07 AM
Huh. Some of you guys have kinda strange doctors letting you weigh yourselves or "shielding" you from weight. At least in my experience I'm always, always weighed. I have an ear infection? Hope on the scale. I punctured my calf? Hop on the scale. I want a referral to someone else? Hop on the scale.

My dr has a sliding scale, too. And it's in the hall, where every nurse and patient passing buy can see and hear my weight as the nurse loudly announces it to me.

Special times for me.

But maybe some doctors have patients weigh themselves because they want people to get used to doing it?? But then why would the nurse not be with them... I don't know. It's odd.

Of course, now that I am basically 'normal' weight and wouldn't mind so much having my weight screamed down a hall, I don't have a dr appt for like a year.

flippychick
12-03-2010, 08:53 AM
Usually when I get weighed at the doctors, I get on the scale backwards because I don't want to know. (I like to use one scale because the number doesn't really matter - it's the relative change I care about.) I scold them when they tell me my weight - and they know they're not supposed to tell you. It's very "triggering" for many people (including me) to starve or binge. And I completely agree that they do it for their records and for medication purposes - I just thought it was odd that in my 39 years, I have never had a doctor's office tell me to weigh myself...

jesslaso
12-04-2010, 07:03 PM
When I lived in Sweden last year I got really sick and had to go to the doctor. They did not weigh me or measure for my height, something I realized after the fact. I asked a Swede about it and she said it was because I didn't go to the doctor about my weight, I went to the doctor about the severe sore throat and high fever. I thought that was super interesting, how a doctors visit and what is seen as "routine" differs between countries.

mmkay
12-09-2010, 04:50 AM
My doctor takes my weight before he even asks why I'm there. It's the first thing that he does after I leave the waiting room. And the scale is also in the hall for anyone to see as they walk by. But I always thought it was routine; never really questioned it. He also takes my temperature and blood pressure every time.

Last time I was there he asked how much I weighed. And I said "I think 160?" And then he still proceeded to weigh me. He was amazed to find out that I was almost exactly right- I weighed a little bit under. He said that people always say they weigh 15 pounds less than they actually do.. I don't really get why he asks for your weight and then weighs you, though.. Seems kind of uneccesary now that I think about it. :dunno: Maybe even slightly cruel...

Zeitgeist
12-09-2010, 10:10 PM
I am one of those people who used to shy away from doctor appointments because I didn't want to face the scale. While lamenting to a friend once day, she stated (as a prior insurance claims adjuster) that most insurance companies require two "vital signs" per doctor's appointment, and that it is easiest to weigh and take blood pressure. She suggested I decline the weigh-in and that they take another vital, which they did (can't recall if it was body temperature or heartbeat).

I'm not sure if that is common with all insurance companies or just the experience in my area. But when I am feeling particularly sensitive about my weight, I no longer hesitate to decline the weigh-in, knowing the reason for it is insurance related.

lauralyn
12-10-2010, 07:28 AM
Unless you are getting an IV medication doses are almost never based on weight for adults, only children. Should you happen to get one of the 2 or 3 outpatient medicines where you weight matters, surely they can just weigh you at that point, rather than weigh you in advance just in case you turn out to have a need for an unexpected IV? :?:




I am not saying for all meds I just gave an example of why it is needed.




. Weight is perceived to be a good indicator of health, but it is not when used as a single measurement. My BMI was more when I was doing gymnastics but I was a smaller dress size. My blood pressure has always been too low, but as soon as I climb on the scales I get lectured about high blood pressure. I used to take sodium supplements to prevent me passing out due to low blood pressure and low sodium levels, but because I am heavy I am told to reduce my salt intake, they don't look.

Your weight is taken as too much of an overall measure of health, the presumption that if you are heavy you are unfit and don't work out. I did gymnastics classes several times a week, swimming, home workouts, loads of walking, but I ate chocolate when I got home so I wasn't skinny. Weight was a terrible measure of my health. When I had my accident I was laid up for weeks and lost a lot of muscle condition and took off 8lbs, and my doctor congratulated me on my loss even though my body fat went up.

If they are going to weigh you they must then go on to ask you more lifestyle questions before deciding that your weight means you are unhealthy, otherwise it's as useful an indication of health as your height.


I did not say it is the only thing used.

SouthLake
12-10-2010, 11:17 AM
My MD takes my weight, blood pressure, pulse, and temp with every.single.vist. It's never bothered me, I know that they use that information to chart changes over time. Admittedly, part of the BP and pulse is that I have a history of low vitals.

Being weighed every time has never bothered me- even at my high weight. I figure most people can tell that I'm overweight by looking at me, so what does it matter if they have official confirmation? It's also important to be able to track changes. If' you've gained a significant amoutn of weight, or lost weight, it can affect your health in good and bad ways. Some sysmptoms that you are experiencing may be a result of rapid weight loss. Significant weight gain can be the cause of other symptoms. I can also be a missing link to interpreting the state of your health.

For example, I have a history of chronic low blood pressure. 80/60 was my high normal, and I have been lower than that quite frequently. However, my body functions just fine with that low of a BP, other than occasional headaches. On one of my last visits- my blood pressure was completely normal. At first, the physician was ecstatic, until she read my chart. My "normal" blood pressure was a result of having gained over 90 pounds in the three years between my physicals. The conclusion is that, while technically in the healthy range, my blood pressure is considered high, based on my personal history. Proof of such- losing the first 30 pounds already dropped my blood pressure back into the low category. So, yes, my blood pressure is "healthy" when I'm obese, but without a weight history to support it, you wouldn't know that it's not really healthy for ME.

HartLover23
12-12-2010, 03:08 AM
I'm unsure why your doctors are all so obsessed with weighing people! Unless it's a specific height and weight check-up (you get one each time you sign with a new doctor but never again) or something to do with blood pressure, diabetes, etc. you just don't get weighed at the doctor.

For one, it's because of prescription medication. Dosage depends on weight, and if you weigh a certain amount, the dosage on a prescription is going to matter. Another reason is that there are a lot of people who don't pay attention to their weight, and if your doctor is recording it for you, and they discover you've gained 15 or 20 or x amount of lbs since your last visit, there might be some underlying medical problem that caused that weight.

Serval87
12-14-2010, 12:30 AM
I remember when I was still in high school, and I went to the doctor because I had a cold. They weighed me, and then berated me for being fat. The doctor lectured me for a LONG time about my weight. It was humiliating. I just sat there glaring at her the whole time. I was only around 170 then ... man, what I'd do to be that size again. :)