Weight Loss Support - How can it be so hard to just not eat something bad???




staybeautiful
11-29-2010, 12:30 PM
Ive tried so hard to stop eating pizza hut and white bread and just everything in general that hurts me,.... but i havent stopped!!!! i go thru so much pop, ive preactically gained back everything i lost... i rly feel as if im going to die by the time im 25 .. im rly short and i weigh more then grown men!!! its horrible :( but i dont no what to do or how to stop.. or certain snacks and brands of food to replace everything with.. when i think i found somehting that is supposably health.. it turns out its not........ i dont know how im going to get out of this.. what do you do? what foods? what brands? any advice or words.. would be rly appreciated... :( thanks :?:


Pint Sized Terror
11-29-2010, 12:40 PM
Sugar and carbs, especially refined ones, can be especially hard to cut out.

I started in baby steps by purchasing ONLY whole wheat bread. Nature's Own 100% whole wheat bread is very good. I don't like the really hearty, kinda dry texture of whole wheat, but N.O. Whole wheat is pretty good.

And with pop, you can either stop it cold turkey, or start rationing yourself.

With Pizza Hut, that one is simple. Don't order it. Don't go in there. Their pizza is REALLY not all that good anyway. It gives me the grumbly guts every time I eat it. :o If you really like pizza, as a lot of people do, start making your own. Boboli has whole wheat crusts. You can also make personal pizzas out of pita breads. You control the toppings, so you will know how many calories/etc are in it.

Start reading nutrition labels. I've always been OCD about reading them anyway, but read EVERYTHING. Sometimes, just seeing that 1/2 of that candy bar has 260 calories in it is enough to stop me from eating it. Pay close attention to servings per container, serving sizes, calories, fat, etc. Look for those on EVERYTHING you pick up at the grocery. If you're going to be eating out, look up the online nutritional info and plan accordingly.

And finally, don't punish yourself. You have to be able to live with your "diet". It should be something long-term and easy to manage. Granted, when you first cut out that pop, and all the fat etc... it's not going to be comfortable. You might feel the need to eat it, but remember that it's NOT quality for you body. You need healthy foods to far outweigh the unhealthy ones. I treat myself every once in a while as well. I haven't completely cut out sugars, white foods and the like. I just practice portion control religiously, plan my meals so I don't go over my maximum calories (1300-1500 depending on how I'm feeling) and I work out 3-5 times a week.

You'll get there!! The hardest and most terrifying part of losing weight is actually getting into a good rhythm. :hug:

And I just wanted to add, in reference to your avatar, you already are a flower. No matter what you look like or weigh, you are still a worthy human being who deserves the best. (and that isn't Pizza hut!! LOL) ;)

rockinrobin
11-29-2010, 01:01 PM
Cold turkey. That is the only way if you ask me.

You can't sneak that stuff in and expect to rid yourself of the cravings.

Cold turkey. That is the only way if you ask me.

I had to make this hard thing easier. So, I banned the stuff. I didn't make it an option TO eat it. After a few uncomfortable weeks, it was pretty much smooth sailing. It was nothing short of miraculous.

But you must learn to tell yourself no and not give in.You've got to work past the uncomfortable moments.

Make sure you have other good stuff available though- lots of cooked and fresh veggies. LOTS of them. Lots. Lots. Lots. Low fat proteins, FF dairy and some fruits.

Make a plan and stick to it like glue. Like glue. Don't give yourself permission to veer off. Be firm. Set up some rules, some boundaries. Push yourself. Challenge yourself.

Work past that temporary, initial discomfort as your wants and desires for the other stuff dies down and you begin to establish new, healthy eating habits.

Losing weight and lots of it a doable thing for every one and any one, yourself included. But please set yourself up for success, getting rid of the junk, planning out your meals/snacks in advance and practicing discipline.

Push yourself. Give it 150%.

If you want what you do not have, you must do what you have not done.

You've got the control, it's there. You just must start using it and strengthening it.

Push yourself. Give it 150%.


Pudgebrownie
11-29-2010, 01:14 PM
Be careful going cold turkey, as it could lead to an indulgent episode of binging! I would suggest baby steps as well. Read the nutritional labels of the foods you're contemplating in eating. Know what calorie range is best suited for you and your body, and make an effort to eat within that. I break my calories down per meal just as a mental not to help me stay on track. Example: B=200ca, L=400ca and D=300ca. Exercise at least 15-20 mins per day or three times weekly if that's more reasonable for you.

katy trail
11-29-2010, 01:32 PM
ok, everything she said and...

try not to stress out about being perfect. the food you eat doesn't have to be completely organic, no preservatives etc. all the time. like she said. baby steps may work best. try to make the whole grain substitutions that have more fiber vitamins. think about similar textures, flavors. lots of subs for foods don't look the same, but they have similar taste or texture to your old favs.

examples:
mix in some wild or brown rice into white rice.
as you go along, increase ratio of brown to white. maybe eventually only eating brown, wild, bulgur wheat, whatever whole grains you like. here's a tip, chicken broth or stock, and whole garlic cloves cooked in the liquid with the rice.


whole wheat bread for white and other types of breads, pita, pizza crust, rolls, tortillas(try flat out! it's a type of flatbread, looks like a huge oval tortilla, 120 cal or light is 90cal lots of fiber too.)

use chicken broth or stock in place of oil when you saute, in a non-stick pan. or use tiny amounts of olive oil.

try baking, broiling, grilling instead of saute or fried.

try veggie burgers or fish fillet instead of hamburgers or other fast food. they cook up quick, keep you full for longer, healthier for you. make either in the microwave for just a few mins.
i like morningstar veggie burgers- veggie and california turkey the best.

make your own burritos ahead of time. portion out and frig or freezer for later.

i replace basil in place of some or all of mayo in tuna salad, on sandwhiches etc. adds tons of flavor. or sub in your fav. herb. i also use basil in place of cheese such as in a burrito when it's covered up anyway.

use a stronger flavored cheese so you can use less. use shredded low-fat, i can't taste the difference. weight watchers makes a really good mexican blend of low-fat cheese.

try to use darker green lettuce family veggies.
romaine instead of iceberg
spinach on pizza or thrown in spaggetti, curry, sandwhiches.
i love it cooked with garlic and spagetti sauce.
try other greens collard greens, beet greens, etc cooked in broth/stock instead of pork fat, or use olive oil in place of the meat.
we need to eat dark greens at least a few times a week, but maybe start with once a month trying a new veggie. work your way up.

replace some of the meat with beans in burritos, chilli, soups. we all need more beans. like i always tell my kids, they are a super food! there's a list of 10 or 20 super foods, easily googled. try to eat any of those foods more often.

many chicks swear by replacing regular noodles with spagetti squash 'noodles'. simply use a fork to make strings or 'noodles' of spagetti squash after you cook it and cut it open. very easy to bake it for an hour. you can also microwave it. or use whole wheat noodles. i usually need a stronger flavored sauce for this though.

well, i'm sure i have lots more ideas, but i guess my brain is out of steam. i think you get the idea. more veggies, whole grain. don't believe all the hype and commercials. eating whole grain cheerios isn't going to make us all lose 30 pounds, because it's technically whole grain. although they are better for us than fruit loops.

just try to do the best you can with what you have :)

Eliana
11-29-2010, 01:39 PM
Even if you don't want to follow the diet, I highly recommend reading about South Beach Diet. I do NOT follow it but I learned so, so, so much about nutrition for that way of eating, and especially about cravings.

It's one thing to say "quit eating carbs", it's another to know what it means. What can you eat? And I liked having a plan. With this diet, you eat very few carbs (gaining carbs only from vegetables and milk) for about two weeks and then start adding them back again slowly. For me, it takes exactly three days of "clean eating" to rid my system of the carbs so I do not crave them anymore.

Again, I do not follow South Beach. But I definitely recommend reading about it because it teaches you so much about carbs and cravings. I no longer need to cut out all carbs, but I definitely need to cut out my trigger foods. At present those are chocolate and pop. Chocolate is tough because I haven't banned it, so every now and then I have to go to a strict chocolate ban for three days until I get the cravings under control. With pop, I banned it. It's gone. I haven't had a sip in over a year and I do not miss it. :D

milmin2043
11-29-2010, 02:01 PM
I agree with Robin on this one. The only way that I have lost almost 70 lbs since June 15th is to make very clear, concise rules for myself and stick to them, no matter what.

Pizza and soda cannot buy itself and show up to your door and fly into your mouth. You have the control and the power over your own body and what goes into it. Only you. When you really decide that you want this, and you make the plan to get it, you will make it happen. I don't mean to sound harsh, just realistic. You have to decide if you want to be healthy or if you want the junk food and crap that will wreck your body. It really is just that simple.
Best wishes on your journey.

Heather
11-29-2010, 02:02 PM
Hi! As you can see, there are lots of opinions out there! The really good news is that there is not just one right way to this this. The trick is, you have to find A Right Way for you!

Some things to think about:
- can you figure out what types of carby food cause the desire to binge? For example, I don't have problems binging on fruit (which are carbs), but other people do. However, you can't leave me and cake in the same room and expect both of us to come out standing.

- do you want to change your diet all at once or take baby-steps? Some people find that moving from "white" carbs (white rice, bread, pasta etc) to "brown" carbs (whole grain versions) is a great way to go, but they need to build up to it because they don't yet have a taste for the whole grain versions-- mixing the new and old is an example of that.

- what other foods are you willing to "change out" and substitute? What foods can you go 'cold turkey' on?

-what resources do you have to learn about this stuff? The South Beach book is a good idea, but there are other places, too.

In other words, you may have to experiment some to find the system that works for you. But we are here to help and be sounding boards!
-

beerab
11-29-2010, 02:19 PM
Someone posted recently that their bf would say to themselves "I know what that tastes like already, I don't need it right now" or something to that effect. And that's how I stopped myself from binging like mad the past week. It has helped a bit honestly. I am up 2 lbs from thanksgiving but nowhere near as bad as I've been in the past after thanksgiving- and I know those two pounds are going to drop after a few days of OP eating :)

I also find the more I stress the harder it is- try to do things to keep your mind OFF of food :)

Rosinante
11-29-2010, 02:20 PM
I don't know it for sure but I firmly believe that some of the foods we/I crave have something in them that produces craving on craving, nothing emotional, something chemical.

For that reason, I also had to have a list of "I don't eat;s" - technically, on calorie counting I could have them in moderation. Practically, I don't have the ability not to overeat them.

Things I can substitute - wholemeal for white bread, for example, I do.

Chocolate - does not pass my lips.

rockinrobin
11-29-2010, 02:25 PM
Be careful going cold turkey, as it could lead to an indulgent episode of binging! I would suggest baby steps as well.


I'm fairly certain AA doesn't teach this method to alcoholics.

The binging that you speak of is most likely caused by allowing the FIRST bite. Because once some people(as seems to be with the OP) START with certain foods, it's very HARD (impossible?) to stop until there's no more of it. IF you ask me, it's that first bite that causes the binging.

If there was never a first bite, then there's no way to binge.

staybeautiful
11-29-2010, 02:26 PM
thanks everyone for the advice... im definitely going to be using everything you guys said.... i rly appreciate :) . it kinda made me rly believe i still have some hope.. so thank yous again!

vdander24
11-29-2010, 02:33 PM
Gotta agree with rockinrobin on this. The one step I took before joining, was that I cut out soda completely. The result was about 20lbs. without doing much else. Once the soda was out of my system, I was able to think more rationally about it. Good Luck! :-)

sacha
11-29-2010, 02:36 PM
You have to find out WHY you do it before you know how to deal with it, IMO.

For me, I was a boredom eater. I would eat when bored, that's it. No emotional attachment to it. For me, I can eat everything in small amounts/calorie counting - whether it is broccoli or chocolate.

BUT that's me.

For some, food is a drug. They cannot just have a little bit of "X". So they make rules for themselves and cut it out - forever, and permanently. If you cannot moderate, then you have two options: continue eating the same, and continue staying the same weight (or more), or cut it out.

Do what is right for you.

If you cannot control your pop, pizza, white bread consumption - then you may need to consider cutting it out completely. You also said you eat things that you think are healthy and find out later they are not. You may want to consider this rule - if you cannot count it (ie the numbers aren't available), then you don't eat it. Period.

Good luck

Pint Sized Terror
11-29-2010, 02:37 PM
Know what calorie range is best suited for you and your body, and make an effort to eat within that. I break my calories down per meal just as a mental not to help me stay on track. Example: B=200ca, L=400ca and D=300ca. Exercise at least 15-20 mins per day or three times weekly if that's more reasonable for you.

900 calories per day is not enough for the average healthy woman. You would be literally starving yourself. The general rule of thumb is to not go below 1200 calories, but you may have to raise that depending on how active you are. I'm fairly active and have been losing as long as I stick to 1300-1500 calories per day. Some days are more than that.

Just had to throw that out there

foodmasochist
11-29-2010, 02:42 PM
that is quite the million dollar question isn't it? i just wanted to recomend a book called "the thin commandments". It can be read with any diet plan. It is all about strategy.

i also wanted to say i did the cold turkey route as well. It worked for me. i committed to going vegan. i'm not saying you have to do that, but i took out processed foods, diet soda (i was an addict) and of course pizza (i have learned cheese is highly addictive, i didn't know this!) and the first week i felt awful. It made me realize what i had been putting my body through if such a natural change made me feel worse (if that makes sense). But then i started feeling great and tasting things so much better. Now i am about 6 weeks in and don't feel like stopping!! Try adding more whole grains and whole foods, natural foods, with short ingredient lists, (that you can pronounce) and shop around the peripheral area of the grocery store. You can always teak it later but i think those are good places to start-please let us know how you are doing, OK?

-fm

milmin2043
11-29-2010, 02:42 PM
Gotta agree with rockinrobin on this. The one step I took before joining, was that I cut out soda completely. The result was about 20lbs. without doing much else. Once the soda was out of my system, I was able to think more rationally about it. Good Luck! :-)

Exactly the same here. I have not had one sip of soda. Lost at least 20 lbs. from that alone. I always thought I hated water, but now I crave it, and that's pretty much all I drink. You have to decide what you want the most. The way I feel lately can't even be measured compared to 6 months ago. It is amazing. I challenge you to give it a try.

Pint Sized Terror
11-29-2010, 02:44 PM
I'm fairly certain AA doesn't teach this method to alcoholics.

The binging that you speak of is most likely caused by allowing the FIRST bite. Because once some people(as seems to be with the OP) START with certain foods, it's very HARD (impossible?) to stop until there's no more of it. IF you ask me, it's that first bite that causes the binging.

If there was never a first bite, then there's no way to binge.

I completely agree. I had to toss out all cookies and sweet snacks. I made going out to eat except for special occasions, off limits.

I hope this doesn't come across as wasteful, but when I first made the decision to change I went through my fridge, cabinets and pantry and threw out THREE GARBAGE BAGS full of food. It was all stuff that had little to no nutritional value, that triggered a binge or were just heavy on the calories. I replaced some things (like JIFF peanut butter) with natural peanut butter. Other things, like chips and Oreos, I refused to replace, even with a "healthier" alternative, knowing I'd just eat myself stupid on the alternatives to those things.

I'm actually able to keep things like chips and Oreos in the house (needed the Oreos for a recipe my SIL wanted me to make) and not eat a single bite of them. You just learn. And your tastes will probably change too, making all those things you used to love (mine was McD's) taste just like what they are. Gross. (C'mon, dehydrated-rehydrated onions on 1/4" thick greasy burger with processed cheese and a preservative-filled bun? No thank you)

sacha
11-29-2010, 02:45 PM
And please don't beat yourself up by thinking "why can't I just not eat it" - you wouldn't tell an alcoholic, "just don't drink it" or an addict "just don't shoot it", you would have more empathy for them. Some of us were overweight because we just like eating too much, but some have real addictions to certain foods.

milmin2043
11-29-2010, 02:49 PM
And please don't beat yourself up by thinking "why can't I just not eat it" - you wouldn't tell an alcoholic, "just don't drink it" or an addict "just don't shoot it", you would have more empathy for them. Some of us were overweight because we just like eating too much, but some have real addictions to certain foods.

Actually, this is exactly what an addict is told. An alcoholic cannot drink any alcohol, AT ALL...ever! A heroin addict has to be totally clean and stay away from circumstances, instances, and people who might bring up the urge to get high. If a person is truly addicted to food and food substances, they must stay away from them and ban them from their life. IMO

Pudgebrownie
11-29-2010, 02:50 PM
I'm fairly certain AA doesn't teach this method to alcoholics.

The binging that you speak of is most likely caused by allowing the FIRST bite. Because once some people(as seems to be with the OP) START with certain foods, it's very HARD (impossible?) to stop until there's no more of it. IF you ask me, it's that first bite that causes the binging.

If there was never a first bite, then there's no way to binge.

I'm not speaking from an AA point of view but rather from the point of view from a bullimic. I could binge massive amounts of food after forcing myself to go cold turkey. I may not have binged on the food I was avoiding but rather would literally eat mass quantities of whatever I could get my hands on. Too much of ANY food is not good.

But personal opinion is personal opinion. You shared yours and I shared mine :) I don't think I've overstepped any bounds by taking into consideration that going cold turkey can have consequences.

sacha
11-29-2010, 02:59 PM
Actually, this is exactly what an addict is told. An alcoholic cannot drink any alcohol, AT ALL...ever! A heroin addict has to be totally clean and stay away from circumstances, instances, and people who might bring up the urge to get high. If a person is truly addicted to food and food substances, they must stay away from them and ban them from their life. IMO

Sorry, I think I mis-wrote, but what I mean is that if someone says, "I'm an alcoholic" or "I'm an addict", you wouldn't roll your eyes at them and say, "uh, why just not drink??" or "Why just not shoot up??" ~ addiction is far more complex than that. While yes, an alcoholic or addict needs to abstain 100% to recover, it's not just a matter of saying "just don't do it" - they need tools and new coping mechanisms to achieve it.

I agree with you 100% :)

kittycarlson
11-29-2010, 03:06 PM
Hi,
I eliminated one thing at a time, sugar, diet soda, white flour. It seemed semi-painless. 2-3 days of craving when I gave up the sugar. I slipped a little over thanksgiving and today there are two kinds of home made cookies and a box of chocolates sitting in the break room. I have been able to walk by there with a reminder that I really want to be back on plan and that after a couple more days they won't even bother me. I need to stay on plan with Christmas coming those goodies will continue to be around until after the beginning of the year when there will all of a sudden be lots of dieters. My goal is to make it through the holidays with small losses and end the season smaller not bigger than I started. I think I can do it and I think you can too if you want it. Good luck to you.

Onederchic
11-29-2010, 03:11 PM
Sugar and carbs, especially refined ones, can be especially hard to cut out.

I started in baby steps by purchasing ONLY whole wheat bread. Nature's Own 100% whole wheat bread is very good. I don't like the really hearty, kinda dry texture of whole wheat, but N.O. Whole wheat is pretty good.

And with pop, you can either stop it cold turkey, or start rationing yourself.

With Pizza Hut, that one is simple. Don't order it. Don't go in there. Their pizza is REALLY not all that good anyway. It gives me the grumbly guts every time I eat it. :o If you really like pizza, as a lot of people do, start making your own. Boboli has whole wheat crusts. You can also make personal pizzas out of pita breads. You control the toppings, so you will know how many calories/etc are in it.

Start reading nutrition labels. I've always been OCD about reading them anyway, but read EVERYTHING. Sometimes, just seeing that 1/2 of that candy bar has 260 calories in it is enough to stop me from eating it. Pay close attention to servings per container, serving sizes, calories, fat, etc. Look for those on EVERYTHING you pick up at the grocery. If you're going to be eating out, look up the online nutritional info and plan accordingly.

And finally, don't punish yourself. You have to be able to live with your "diet". It should be something long-term and easy to manage. Granted, when you first cut out that pop, and all the fat etc... it's not going to be comfortable. You might feel the need to eat it, but remember that it's NOT quality for you body. You need healthy foods to far outweigh the unhealthy ones. I treat myself every once in a while as well. I haven't completely cut out sugars, white foods and the like. I just practice portion control religiously, plan my meals so I don't go over my maximum calories (1300-1500 depending on how I'm feeling) and I work out 3-5 times a week.

You'll get there!! The hardest and most terrifying part of losing weight is actually getting into a good rhythm. :hug:

And I just wanted to add, in reference to your avatar, you already are a flower. No matter what you look like or weigh, you are still a worthy human being who deserves the best. (and that isn't Pizza hut!! LOL) ;)


I agree with this. Good luck, you CAN do it :) :hug:

rockinrobin
11-29-2010, 03:12 PM
I don't think I've overstepped any bounds by taking into consideration that going cold turkey can have consequences.


Of course not! That's what this place is all about.

but some have real addictions to certain foods.
^^So agreed.^^

Acknowledging that is very important. Because addictions need to be *handled* differently than other issues.

Being an addict and actually believing for a long time that I'd rather not live than live without certain foods, I can attest just how different my issue was/is. If it's extraordinary results one is after, extraordinary measures will have to be taken

And when you think about it, what is really that extraordinary about it? This is hindsight of course. But we're not talking about passing up on food. Just certain ones. Those empty calorie, nutrient vacant, concocted foods that leave many people clamoring for more.

The reason I mentioned AA and an alcoholic, because it seems as if the OP has an addiction (as opposed to your scenario) to certain foods. And with addictions, abstinence is an extremely successful way of dealing with it. An addict knows no moderation. It's a closed box of cookies or an empty box. It sounds as if the OP tried moderation to no avail. The definition of insanity -doing the same thing over and over again, yet expecting a different result.

Elladorine
11-29-2010, 03:25 PM
I really had to bite the bullet on the soda thing. It's so many empty calories, and the more you drink, the more you want. I'd crave it so badly, felt like I'd never have enough, and had to pee constantly. :o

I've made myself a couple of rules about soda. First of all, I never order it when I go out to eat. Period. Not even diet soda (I'll explain in a minute). I ask for plain iced tea, and if they don't have it, I order bottled water (which I often do in a movie theater) or just have tap water. I don't even let myself consider soda to be an option.

The only soda I do buy has to be sugar and aspartame-free, which can be annoyingly hard to find. Based on what I've read, virtually all diet fountain sodas contain aspartame (which has had horribly ill effects on me) and is why I never order soda while going out to eat. As for buying at the store, I stick with Diet Rite, Diet Hansen's, or Zevia as an occasional treat. But overall I mostly try to drink water, teas, grapefruit juice, and lite cranberry juice. There are some really great-tasting herbal teas available at the stores that can be sweetened with something like stevia (a natural calorie-free sweetener) or don't even need to be sweetened at all. You can also pick up soda water and add a bit of juice for some carbonated sweetness.

* * *

As for Pizza Hut, I used to be a manager at one . . . and when there were always free leftovers for the employees from running a buffet, talk about temptation! :dizzy: If you really must have PH pizza, always order thin crust. While not ideal, it's so much better than choosing the hand-tossed crust and especially the pan crust. If you saw how much oil is pumped into the pan before the dough is added, you'd freak (it might as well be deep-fried bread)! Choose lots of veggie toppings: peppers, tomatoes, onions, mushrooms, etc., and avoid fatty toppings like pepperoni. Get yourself a salad or some side veggies to eat immediately before and eat slowly so you'll be more satisfied with less slices.

* * *

Plan out your grocery shopping ahead of time. Look up the "super foods" and healthy recipes that sound appealing to you . . . remember, google is your friend. :) Check out what healthier substitutions you can make for foods that may feel too difficult to give up just yet. Make yourself a list and once you get to the store, stick to it! And (this is very important!) make sure you're not hungry when you go shopping.

As other people have been saying here, switch out your white foods (rice, bread, etc.) for whole grains. Fill up on yummy veggies! Turn up your nose and say no to foods that make you feel like an addict. You deserve to be healthy, you deserve to be in control.

Hope this helps. :hug:

milmin2043
11-29-2010, 03:41 PM
Turn up your nose and say no to foods that make you feel like an addict. You deserve to be healthy, you deserve to be in control.

Absolutely! I 100% agree with this statement. When you decide that you are worth it (in your own words, you say that you think you will be dead at 25 if you continue on your current course), things will click and you will just do it.

rockinrobin
11-29-2010, 04:28 PM
You have to love yourself enough to do what is necessary to succeed.

vdander24
11-29-2010, 04:58 PM
I really agree with Pint size-terror on this. I know that while I have kicked the soda, (Thank F*'n goodness!) I am working on the others. People have given some really good advice, and it is all correct. I think the first step for us is that we have to BREAK THE PATTERN. at some point. STOP doing what we have been doing; to break the "addiction"

Some programs do the same thing. South Beach, Atkins... They have a two week "starter" period where it is most strict, and it seems to be designed to break our hold on those addictive foods, and then, in time, they are added back in with moderation. (when we can think about the food more rationally).

justaloozer
11-29-2010, 05:11 PM
I know what you mean. I was down to 272 from 315 lbs and now I am back up to 296! I really could kick the crap out of myself for letting things get this bad- AGAIN! Best of luck to you sweetie!

Glory87
11-29-2010, 06:25 PM
I went cold turkey, but it was an accident.

I had read this book Super Foods Rx: 14 Foods that Will Change Your Life and I knew, down to my bones, that I could lose weight and be healthy and lose the weight forever. It was...galvanizing.

So, I immediately started trying to eat as many super foods a day as possible and trying to eat pretty much only super foods (just for the record they are: oatmeal, tofu, turkey, berries, tomatoes, walnuts, yogurt, oranges, broccoli, spinach, pumpkin, beans and salmon). Each super food has sidekick foods (like orange pepper and carrots for pumpkin, so I ate those too). I was rational enough to know that stuff like mushrooms or zucchini weren't super foods but were okay for my plan.

Well - look what I did. A whole foods diet. No junk. No sugar. No white carbs. Very little processed foods. I was eating wonderful, healthy foods every day, in generous portions. In one month, I had dropped at least 10 lbs, I felt energetic, I felt wonderful and for the first time in my life, my food cravings were GONE. All my life, I had thought I had a problem with food, it turns out I have a problem with CERTAIN FOODS (pretzels, chips, cold cereal, crackers, bread). I got rid of those and I went from a 20 year yo-yo dieter to a 6 year maintainer. Like magic. Seriously, after all those years of struggle, it felt like someone had waved a magic wand over my head.

My plan has evolved over time, but it's mainly the super foods diet. Sticking to it works for me.

So, like Robin, I will always advise at least trying a cold turkey approach. What's the worst thing that can happen - it doesn't work? Then try something else.

FreeBird3
11-29-2010, 09:36 PM
You don't have to completely give up pizza hut. According to my nutrionist, you can have 2 slices of thin and crispy cheese pizza from Pizza Hut (380 calories total). Also, if you can't quit soda cold turkey, then ween yourself off by drinking diet soda at first and then eventually ween yourself off of diet soda and onto water.

I use to eat an entire medium size pizza from Pizza Hut in 1 sitting (I'm a self-confessed emotional eater). After about a week of eating smaller meals, I think my stomach got smaller because 2 slices of cheese pizza filled me up! Hang in there! :)

Glory87
11-29-2010, 10:03 PM
Well, unless you are me and 2 pieces of pizza starts off an internal GONG of "pizzapizzapizzapizza". It might be okay if I buy it by the slice so there are JUST 2 pieces and no more, but in a social situation with a couple of pies on the table, I have EVER been able to stop at 2. Not even after all my years of maintenance. Plus, carbs like that can have this weird effect where I get a hollow, achy hole in the pit of my stomach. I noticed it earlier most recently when I had half a bagel at a company breakfast, my stomach felt hurty-hungry and I wanted MORE food.

kaplods
11-29-2010, 10:41 PM
David Kessler's book "The End of Overeating," really opened my eyes. Although I already (thought that I) understood carb addiction, I didn't realize that my attempts at moderation with trigger foods were much like trying to use heroine, crack, and crystal meth "in moderation." If even lab rats got hooked on these foods, how can I break the addiction?

I'm trying to eliminate all of the foods that trigger overeating, but I'm having mixed success. I'm a former probration officer, and if bingeing on trigger foods were illegal and there was "food probation" my probation would be revoked (or at least I'd be mandated into treatment).

We don't look at food issues as addictions, though. While there are treatments available for a lot eating disorders, overeating is not one of them (well, there is treatment available, but it tends to be more expensive than other eating disorder treatments, and it's generally not covered by medical insurance).

If you stop eating, you're ill with anorexia, but if you can't stop eating you're just a lazy glutton (or if you're thin, you're lucky, unless you barf it up then you're ill with bulimia).

I'm not whining that there isn't help out there for overeaters, there is and a lot of it's even free, it's just buried in so much misinformation it's hard to find.

Confusing the issue even more, is the fact that not all overeaters are overweight, and not all overweight and obese are chronic or compulsive overeaters.

I'm learning that even some foods people assume to be healthy foods, are nonetheless triggers for me, and it's so hard to look at these foods as drugs when our culture does not. Even when I know these foods are as emotionally and physically dangerous to me as street drugs would be to a drug addict, I'm still thinking it won't be Christmas unless I have a few pieces of my mother's homemade caramels, even though last year I had a "sugar bender" like I hadn't had in decades after a few pieces of those caramels. In less than 7 days, I had eaten more sugar than I probably had eaten in the entire previous year (I didn't gain much weight, because I did get right back on track, but I felt like I was hit by a bus, and the taste of those caramels was not worth walking out in front of a bus on purpose, so what the heck did I think I was doing?)

Maybe there will be a day I can do trigger foods in moderation, but I rather doubt it (especially after reading David Kessler's book). I just don't know if I'll ever acheive true and complete abstinence with so many people, including close family and friends and even the television pressuring me to have at least "just one bite" all of the time.

ubergirl
11-29-2010, 11:31 PM
Lots of good advice here, but I'll weigh in with mine.

I was a binge eater for about 30 years. Maybe longer. I started when I was a kid-- I used to sneak into the kitchen at night and steal food-- I got hard core as a teen and kept it up until my late 40s.

I'm a health care provider and I knew all about calories in and calories out and exercise and nutrition, and all that. What I did not know was the answer to your question: how do I stop myself from eating the bad stuff?

I went to a specialist psychologist at a huge and famous medical center in New York. I went to a hundred dollar an hour nutritionist at another famous university hospital. Nothing. Nada. Zip. I felt that I had a special psychological quirk that kept me from being able to stop eating.

So I gave myself a pass. I was "unable" to stop. I "couldn't" I was "powerless. I was miserable, morbidly obese and getting worse every year.

But here's the thing. Believing that I had a "special psychological quirk" allowed me to pretty much eat whatever I wanted whenever I wanted. Craving a cupcake? I'd make a secret run to the store and buy six. Sometimes I wanted some very specific thing, like a pound of Twizzlers, or chocolate eclairs. And if I wanted it, I'd go get it, and if I couldn't get it I'd always find something to binge on... Sure, I tried to stop, but I thought I was powerless.

Then, one day, about eighteen months ago, I actually did stop. I had a powerful motivation because I had a career goal that I could not possibly meet because of my weight. I panicked and just STOPPED EATING CRAP.

Guess what? I already knew which foods I shouldn't be eating. I had never once binged on veggies, or chicken breast. But baked goods, salty snacks, candy, and the kind of carbs that can be slathered with butter: rice, noodles, pasta, bread, they all went on my no list. I stopped eating them. And it did NOT trigger a binge.

When I was in training for my health care career I had to do a psych rotation, and I remember sitting in on a group therapy session with a bunch of drug addicts. The discussion was about saying goodbye to their best friend-- the drug, and how much they missed that drug, and how there were good things about being an addict.

So, that's how I felt about food. I wanted to be healthier and thinner but TO BE PERFECTLY HONEST I always wanted the food more.

Now, I still struggle from time to time, but I don't ever binge, and I don't need to keep myself away from those foods, in fact, I can keep them in the house and I don't even look at them.

It IS POSSIBLE to teach yourself not to eat those foods, but you have to actually sit down face to face with yourself and be brutally honest and decide: which do you love more, yourself and your health? Or the pizza and the pop? Are you truly and genuinely willing to say that you will not eat or drink that ever again and that you have eaten and drunk enough already in your life to make up for lost time. If the answer is yes, then you just need to set your mind to it.

The hopeful thing I can say is that the struggle is surprisingly easier than it seems. The struggle not to eat certain foods is only horrible and unbearable when your brain is pretty sure that eventually you are going to give in. It keeps tapping on your shoulder whispering "are you going to say Uncle, or what?" But if you are 100% certain, deep down, where it matters that you are DONE eating and drinking the stuff that makes you fat, then the little voice will die down and go away in a surprisingly short amount of time.

There are definitely people who succeed without "going cold turkey" but the cold turkey method seems to work very well for people who feel very out of control around food.

The most important thing to remember is that being obese is very very hard, and getting thinner is relatively easy-- the hardest part is believing it can be done.

Glory87
11-29-2010, 11:49 PM
Great post.

katy trail
11-30-2010, 12:08 AM
i'm really enjoying reading this interesting thread. it's completely intriguing to me that when we all read the first post, we had different reactions. i read it and thought she needed specific substitions. healthier alternatives, ways to transition into the healthy eating. others read this and realized she may have an addiction to certain foods. i don't think either is wrong, it's just really interesting that we all have such different approaches and reactions.

the really great thing about those rules, 'no pizza' or whatever the rule is. once you've made the rule, you just don't have to think about it anymore. there's no more negotiating of moderation. 'oh, i'll just have 1 little piece...etc.' once you give in, you keep thinking about having more.

i tried the cold turkey method/rule method with Halloween candy this year. while i can't say i've banned all sugar or junk completely, i completely abstained from eating any of my kids' candy this year. first time ever. and i rarely thought about it, or looked at it. i'm not a chocolate addict, i hardly think about desert, but i knew once i had a little, i would want more. the negotiations in my head would begin. so i just had none.
instead of feeling like i was missing out, i felt proud. it's the mental victories that may seem so small, that often matter the most.

for me, this was always about my mind. my head. i get in my own way. i knew what to do. thankfully, this site and friends i've met on here have helped alot.

i think with a bit of experimentation, an open optimistic, determined mind, you'll no doubt have success! i'm sure we'll all be eager to find out how you are doing.

shannonmb
11-30-2010, 04:38 AM
I felt that I had a special psychological quirk that kept me from being able to stop eating.


I loved your whole post, ubergirl. This sentence really jumped out at me, because for pretty much forever, I really thought there was something about my psychological makeup that made me want to eat, eat, eat. And I just didn't think there was anything to be done about it. I'm just the girl who wants to eat ridiculous amounts of food all the time, so I guess I'll just always be the fat girl. Sure, I could use my decidely considerable will power to lose weight from time to time, but it always ended in giving in and eating back to where I was before and then some.

I can't say with 100% certainty that I finally have the whole thing figured out, but I have had a couple of revelations lately that I thought I would share.

For me, eating certain things just begets more eating. I scared myself with my high weight of 350 lbs, and made the decision one day that this was going to stop. Thankfully, when I decided this, I also got myself on a really good plan of calorie counting and being mindful of carbs, especially sugars and processed stuff. I hit the ground running and didn't really look back. I've lost 70+ pounds since May with this way of eating, and because I am so committed, I didn't really veer from the course at all. Losing weight was becoming pretty easy for me, because my appetite was totally in control. I was not hungry! I got to the point where I ate my healthy meals, then didn't really even think about food again until it was almost time for the next. This experience has really made me wonder how I ever got so large in the first place. I was thinking to myself, WOW, all I have to do is stay under a certain amount of calories, and the weight is just falling off at a nice steady pace. EASY!

Well, over this Thanksgiving, I am realizing why I got so large in the first place. I had my meal, and it did include some foods I'm no longer accustomed to eating. Not very much, mind you. A spoonful of corn casserole, a spoonful of stuffing, a spoonful of a squash bake with a sweet and buttery crumbly crust, and one piece of pumpkin cream cheese pie. Okay, I'll take the calorie hit for the day, no biggie. Right back on plan the next day, back to eating my sensible way. HA! The next 2 days I pretty much had to tie myself down to keep out of the leftovers, even having thoughts about raiding my DD's Halloween candy that has been sitting there for a month untouched and un-thought-of by me. I abstained, and now 5 days later, I'm back in my regular mindset. But I had to white-knuckle it for at least a good 2 days because of the cravings those few spoonfuls of rich, buttery, carby foods brought on. Luckily, I am still at a place where failure is not an option. But that may not always be the case.

So now. I doubt I will ever tell myself I will never eat X again as long as I live. But I am extremely aware that it is a very slippery slope. It's not the calories I'm eating right then, it's that I will need to go back to that initial discomfort and cravings for at least a few days every time I do. And I must decide on a case-by-case basis if it's worth it. 99% of the time, it's not.

Sorry so long, but this realization is becoming THE difference for me. It is what will make this possible for me for the long haul. Good luck, OP!!

rockinrobin
11-30-2010, 05:36 AM
Yes Uber, another great post. Your post resonates with me in a big way.

Yours too Shannon.

Certain foods give me the sensation that I can't shove it in my mouth fast enough. They send me into a feeding frenzy.

When I made the decision to lose the weight, I knew without any doubt that THOSE were the foods that would have to go.

I made peace with it. Those foods certainly tasted good, but they were extremely harmful to my health. And I was no longer willing to put my life on the line for food.

When we speak of cold turkey, so many people can't fathom it (I was one of them for decades quite frankly), and are so opposed to it as if we're suggesting this bizarre out of this world, unthinkable thing, totally undo-able thing.

Lots of people have to adhere to special diets to keep their conditions at bay and no one opposes them or thinks they are so unreasonable and undo-able in the same manner that this special diet gets treated; And it makes me sad as you hear successful person after successful person share their experiences :(

Yes, there is more than one way to do things, but here you have a tried and true method.. just sayin'...

I'm kinda sad that the OP hasn't checked back in....

Runundefined
11-30-2010, 06:51 AM
This is a great thread.
I wanted to post to the OP that I know what you are going thru. I have fallen back into my old food patterns.

Sugar is addictive. White bread and pasta and processed crackers, snacks and such just turn into sugar in your system.

I had lots of success a couple of years ago and one thing I did was totally cut out all forms of sugar and most carbs. It truly helped me get ahold of my appetite. The constant blood sugar swings kept me hungry and when I got that in line with a pretty low carb diet I was able to get back in control.

I am starting back on this plan today.. for breakfast I am making a large serving of eggs (mostly whites with one yolk) and lots of veggies.. onions, tomatos, green and red bell and jalapeno (love it!). This was my fav. breakfast back then.

It helps me to make a plan for 2-3 days.. what my meals will be with a snack or two and have it all on paper.

WE can do this... I am here if you want to chat!

TooManyDimples
11-30-2010, 09:41 AM
Not having the food around is key for me. I started Mid October, got rid of anything bad, filled the house with healthy whole options. And in a little over a month I was down 14 pounds.

Last week I went home for Thanksgiving. I took things with me, I planned on buying other things when I got there. My sister's house was FULL junk and holiday goodies. Being surrounded by all that stuff, my mom cooking delicious meals, getting talked into eating out, I COMPLETELY lost my will power. I managed to get in a healthy breakfast and had a banana or apple during the day, but for lunch and dinner I completely indulged. And I wont lie, I REALLY enjoyed it. I felt guilty, but I kept telling myself it was a holiday and I was with family and I would get back on track when I got home.

And I have. I got back in my own environment Saturday evening, and I've had no problem getting back on plan. Here I have complete control over what's in the house. I'm doing the cooking, and there is no longer junk around, it's out of site out of mind for me.

I know I should have had better control while I was gone, I'm not happy with myself for losing a week on my journey because I gave in, but I'm not beating myself up over it and now I'm 100% back in the right mind set because I have complete control over the food around me again.

rockinrobin
11-30-2010, 09:50 AM
[QUOTE] I'm 100% back in the right mind set because I have complete control over the food around me again.

Sounds like you're recovering nicely. Good job for getting back to it.

At some point though, you may have to learn how to adhere to your healthy food plan while outside your home.

There's a LOT of events that take place out of our home between all the holidays, parties, social functions, business meals, and what not, so getting a handle on it is fairly important.

For me, planning it out ahead of time is vital. Deciding which foods I will eat and which I won't. I need to set myself some boundaries, some limits, otherwise the choices are overwhelming and I'm MUCH more likely to stray. I need to narrow my food pool.

TooManyDimples
11-30-2010, 09:55 AM
Oh believe me Robin, I know I have to learn to control it no matter what situation I'm in. I definitely failed my first test, but I'm a work in progress and hopefully the longer I do this, the easier it will get. =)

Glory87
11-30-2010, 10:05 AM
Social situations and "surprise food" are still my downfall after all this time. Sometimes I do okay, and sometimes I don't. I just remind myself that one night of cheese, wine and crackers didn't make me heavy and get right back to it the next meal.

My eating is so planned and structured I am "on plan" by default probably 95% of the time. I know exactly what I'm eating (meals and snacks through Friday night, for example). Being so careful makes indulgences possible, as long as they are controlled (someone else's house, for example).

staybeautiful
11-30-2010, 10:31 AM
all these posts have given me a lot of insight about what i need to do.... i thought i should also kinda fo ezxplain the situation.. i live in a house with alll boys who think a carboard box is whole wheat...... i cant stock the cupboards with healthy food.. becuase it isnt my house... i feel as if im ruining it for everyone else, when they want somehting and because me we cant get it.. then i end up feeling horrible.. and it turns into a crazy tug of war game in my head.... another thing i wanted to know about is.. have any of you ever gotten the feeling when u start eating something bad.. and u feel it hurting... giving u bad feelings in ur stomach and burning ur throat.. but u cant stop.. my heart starts pounding and i just want more n more.. i dont even need to taste it.. i just need to have it.. .... it makes me feel rly ashamed.. im starting to think its cause i dont like who i am.... i love animals.. and one day just decided to go vegetarian and i havent touched meat in over 5 months.. that meant saying goodbye to all that fastfood... but how can i not say goodbye to crap to help me? how can i do something to save someone else? but completely disregard everything my body is telling me... and keep diggin my own grave???? im sorry if i sound crazy but there is so much going thru me and i dont no how to handle any of it....

rockinrobin
11-30-2010, 10:41 AM
Social situations and "surprise food" are still my downfall after all this time. Sometimes I do okay, and sometimes I don't. I just remind myself that one night of cheese, wine and crackers didn't make me heavy and get right back to it the next meal.

My eating is so planned and structured I am "on plan" by default probably 95% of the time. I know exactly what I'm eating (meals and snacks through Friday night, for example). Being so careful makes indulgences possible, as long as they are controlled (someone else's house, for example).


Ahh, you and me both, but I think for both of us, during the losing portion of our journeys' this was not the case. Maintenance - yes, losing - no. I could be mistaken Glory, if so I apologize.

Though one night of cheese and crackers didn't make me heavy, it was that kind of thinking that would not have allowed me to LOSE the weight.

If you factor in all those "just one nights", they add up in a big gigantic way.

-Thanksgiving
-Christmas work party among others
-Christmas Eve
-NEw YEars EVe
-New Years Day
-Super bowl party
-Valentines Day
-Easter
-Memorial Day
-Fourth of July
-Barbecues
-Birthdays, our own and family and friends
-Anniversaries
-Weddings
-business functions

That's just the tip of the iceberg.. Depending on what religion you are, there are loads more holidays... then there's just the regular weekend stuff. Yup, lots of "only one days"...

Oh believe me Robin, I know I have to learn to control it no matter what situation I'm in. I definitely failed my first test, but I'm a work in progress and hopefully the longer I do this, the easier it will get

You'll get there. You most definitely will. And yes, it does get easier. You've got the control. It's there. You've just got to strengthen it. Each time you use it, it gets stronger and stronger. You'll also build confidence just knowing that you've "gotten through it one time". It's very empowering. :carrot:

Glory87
11-30-2010, 01:03 PM
Oh yeah - I was on plan during my actual weight loss. I "indulged" exactly twice - my birthday and Christmas day (and both times were controlled indulgences).