Weight Loss Support - If you knew then what you know now...




katkitten
11-22-2010, 06:03 PM
what is the most important thing you would have done differently in order to prevent you from gaining weight?

I honestly think that if I had stayed hydrated and learned to like water when I was a teenager I probably never would have become as obese as I did. I remember that I always had dark/scant urine even when I was a kid. I have probably spend most of my life mildly dehydrated. I used to be ravenous all the time and I thought I had some kind of medical problem that just made me really hungry but I think I was really just thirsty. It is so much easier to control my eating when I drink enough water!


beerab
11-22-2010, 06:24 PM
The most important thing I would have done differently was to eat breakfast! I always skipped breakfast and was ravenous by lunchtime! I realize just how bad that was to do now :(

runningfromfat
11-22-2010, 06:24 PM
I wish I could've really explained to my pregnant self that you don't need sugar for a good life. I drowned myself during my pregnancy in chocolate and I'm paying the price now. :( I knew better but still did it. What I didn't know is how to cook well without sugar and that part I really wish I could've passed on to my former self!!!!


Oboegal
11-22-2010, 06:48 PM
A lot of it I don't know if I could have fixed until I got my head together, which made it possible for me to beat emotional eating and easier for me to beat habitual eating.

But the biggest single thing that would have helped me if I knew it sooner is that I can't handle a low-fat diet. I could have avoided several well-intentioned, but ultimately unsuccessful and demoralizing, diets if I had known that.

sal27253
11-22-2010, 06:50 PM
I'd have stopped myself at one. I always wanted more as a kid. I'd want more candy, more cakes, another soda an extra sandwich a second roll or scoop and mashed. I just wish I had had someone whisper in my ear "just one" everytime I reached for more.

Horo
11-22-2010, 07:08 PM
I would have learned to cook earlier, and would have begged my mother for fresh(and healthy) ingredients to do so with(because nothing that like was ever in my house when I was growing up).

When I DID start to learn to cook, I was about 10 - 11 years old and already has a pretty severe weight problem by then. The problem there was that I only learned to cook the kind of things my mother cooked the rare times she did: stuff loaded with fat, simple carbs, and lots of calories. I was cooking fettuccine alfredo, breaded chicken that was baked in butter, spaghetti with white pasta and beef in the sauce, macaroni and cheese from scratch, etc. Back then I always thought the homemade stuff would at least be better than the fast/junk food that was brought home every night, and that by learning to cook perhaps I'd help myself with the weight problem.. well, no, just... no.

It was only by age 13-14 that I learned to cook the healthy foods that enabled me to lose those 65 lbs, and I only really wish I had the knowledge and the means to do so before that.

HadEnough
11-22-2010, 07:16 PM
I would have never started to drink alcohol. I firmly believe that was one of the largest contributing factors to my obesity. As drinking just leads to bad, bad choices.

katkitten
11-22-2010, 07:39 PM
yeah...alcohol too lol

popspry
11-22-2010, 08:08 PM
I would have learned to cook. I am learning now and I love it but I spent high school and most of college eating highly processed foods because if I couldn't microwave it, I didn't know how to make it.

Now I can make my own tortillas, bread, pizza crusts and healthy dinners using healthy techniques and I get so excited to learn more.

JenMusic
11-22-2010, 09:53 PM
I never understood the concept of portion control, or calories in/calories out.

However, the BIGGEST thing I would have done is (try to) divorce eating from emotions. Food doesn't have to be the thing we turn to in love, joy, sadness, and fear. There are other, much better, ways of processing emotions than eating. I would have taught my younger self to learn some of those ways.

Sunday
11-22-2010, 09:58 PM
I wish I had known that weight loss didn't have to be a soul destroying process, I wish I'd known how to count calories, and I wish I'd known that there are worse things than being overweight. That I could be beautiful, worthy, and overweight at the same time.

If I'd known those three things, I would have had a completely different experience of my teen years.

Although in retrospect I probably didn't have the maturity to be healthy about it at that time...

If I could go back, I'd tell myself that if I counted calories and practised patience, everything would work out.

shcirerf
11-22-2010, 10:19 PM
I would have never started to drink alcohol. I firmly believe that was one of the largest contributing factors to my obesity. As drinking just leads to bad, bad choices.

I hear that one! And the "clean plate" club. My mother did that one. Thankfully, I did not do that to my kids. Somehow, my kids ended up reasonably sane, don't know how that happened.

And I would have skipped one traumatic childhood event. The one relative everyone thought was so great, well, wasn't. :?:

katkitten
11-22-2010, 10:39 PM
Regrettably, I'm still a member of the clean plate club. I just make sure it's a much smaller plate now lol

rockinrobin
11-22-2010, 10:52 PM
And I would have skipped one traumatic childhood event. The one relative everyone thought was so great, well, wasn't. :?:

This is almost word for word what I was going to say.

That would have been the one thing I would have changed - to have not gone through what I did at aged 10.

I was going to say, I would have changed how I would have dealt with it, but you know what, I was 10. I didn't know. So, yeah, I would have just skipped the whole darn experience.

kylonaa
11-22-2010, 11:28 PM
I would like to have changed two things

1. Never discovered fast food. I think that has been my biggest downfall- I can cook fairly healthy meals but ever since junior year when I got to go off campus to buy lunch I could go days eating both meals out. And then the dining hall at college which is basically fast food...

2. The second would be embracing activity more as a child. Growing up I was a huge reader and all I wanted to do was curl up on the couch with a bowl of goldfish reading a good book. I associate food with the comfort of that time and I think that's why I go for food when I'm stressed.

katy trail
11-23-2010, 01:03 AM
just simple regular exercise. some kind of exercise or extra moving each day.

and learning that the portion sizes i'm 'soposed' to eat, do actually apply to me.

what i know now is that the cycle starts with exercise. intense, give everything i have cardio usually. but it starts there.
exercise, control myself when i eat afterwards so i don't undo the cal. i burned, eat what is 'worth' it, bc i don't want to spend 2 hours running off a peice of cake, or more likely a block of cheese.

what's different now is, when i over eat, or eat when i'm not hungry, i'm AWARE of it. for so many years i wasn't aware. and that means i'm less likely to do it, and can stop when i recognize it.

i'm only just starting to learn about ways to cook low fat or without fat. i wish i knew in my teen years. i was interested in cooking, the info is so much more available now. and info about very healthy food like vegan or just lots of whole foods.

KenzideRhae
11-23-2010, 03:56 AM
If I had realised sooner why I overate/ate emotionally, I don't think I would have gained quite as much weight as I did. I also wish I hadn't stopped exercising-- which was partially tied in with the same childhood stuff that lead to the eating part-- because even though I was always a little heavier, staying active helped to keep my weight down. When I stopped completely is when things got really out of hand. If I had known to just keep up with the exercise while working out the eating problems, I would never have stopped!

catherinef
11-23-2010, 04:34 AM
I should never have allowed myself to go so long without a scale. There's a lot of other stuff I never had the power to change, so I'm sticking with something I know for sure was under my control: I should've bought a scale long before I did.

Shmead
11-23-2010, 05:44 AM
I should never have allowed myself to go so long without a scale. There's a lot of other stuff I never had the power to change, so I'm sticking with something I know for sure was under my control: I should've bought a scale long before I did.

I like this one: my mother always encouraged me to never weigh, just go by your clothes, but it turns out accurate knowledge helps me, it doesn't demoralize.

I wish I had known that "calorie counting" doesn't automatically mean "900 calories a day, 1200 if you are a total wimp". I basically either tried to eat 900 calories (and would be perfect for 3-6 months before collapsing) or ate whatever I could get my hands on.

seagirl
11-23-2010, 06:46 AM
I would never have started eating butter again, and I would have moved to a place that was more walking friendly sooner, and I would have a left an unsatisfying relationship sooner.

nelie
11-23-2010, 07:27 AM
I gained most of my weight before the age of 14 so it is difficult to say what I would've done differently because my mom tried to cook healthy foods and we didn't eat processed junk and I was involved in activities. I think if I had a chance, I would've had a doctor look into my irregular periods more but what would they have done for a 12-13 yr old with irregular/heavy periods? I'm guessing they would think that was normal.

mkendrick
11-23-2010, 09:04 AM
I wish somebody had taught me portion control. I remember my dad scooping me HUUUGE bowls of ice cream that were probably 4 or 5 servings. I was always told to clean my plate, even if I had very large portions. I was always given the last little bit so leftovers weren't cluttering the fridge. I was taught about the economics of getting the bang for your buck...the King Size Snickers bar is cheaper by the ounce than the regular-sized one...get the King Size. As a result, my idea of what a satisfying portion is, is very skewed. I KNOW that an appropriate portion of meat is about the size of a deck of cards, but even after a year of eating better, it just looks so tiny and unsatisfying and I feel deprived if I eat that tiny piece.

Eliana
11-23-2010, 09:28 AM
Three things from me:

1. If only I'd known about portion control, specifically that a portion of chicken is HALF a breast.

2. I wish I'd known it was ok to weigh daily. I doubt I'd have put on so much if I had been watching the number go up and up and up.

3. I wish I'd known how different my activity level was going from walking everywhere in college to moving into basically a desk job after college. I didn't realize I'd gone from active to sedentary. I hadn't realized I was active in college because I didn't do any formal exercise. Just walking (ALOT) was enough.

NiteNicole
11-23-2010, 02:37 PM
I wish I had known that I wasn't actually fat. Five to ten pounds over weight, even twenty is not an emergency!

If I hadn't thought I was already a lost cause, I would have taken better care of myself.

Rana
11-23-2010, 02:41 PM
1) Education. I never learned anything about nutrition, calories, exercise, food, until recently. I wish I had been taught these details and how our bodies respond to food twenty years ago.

2) PCOS treatment. I wish I had treated my PCOS differently. I didn't know what it meant when I was first diagnosed, so I ignored it for MANY years. I wish I hadn't now. I think my weight loss would have been easier and faster when I was younger.

Sea
11-23-2010, 03:31 PM
I wish I had known it was okay to stand up for myself.

HadEnough
11-23-2010, 06:24 PM
I wish I had known that I wasn't actually fat. Five to ten pounds over weight, even twenty is not an emergency!

If I hadn't thought I was already a lost cause, I would have taken better care of myself.

Couldn't have said that better myself Nicole. I always felt fat, so I thought, well, I might as well be fat. So, I never took care of myself either. When I graduated high school, I was 122 pounds. And I felt fat? WTH was I thinking? It's amazing what your mind can convince you of. Now, I wish I was 222. LOL! I'll get there. Eventually.

krampus
11-23-2010, 08:23 PM
I really don't know. The first time I ever strung two words together to form a sentence, I said "More ham."

There was no isolated incident that caused me to put on weight or develop issues with food. I have just always liked eating. I'm not sure my childhood weight gain was really preventable since at the time I didn't know or care about calories and nutrition.

As for slowly putting on lost weight throughout college and Japan, there were factors. For starters, I would have said "**** no" to the bagels with cream cheese I ate for breakfast every summer at my internship. I suppose I would have been more vigilant about taking my birth control pill. I managed to gain 5 lbs in 4 weeks of pregnancy and instead of working to get rid of the gain, I just pretended it wasn't there. Like the bagels and cream cheese weight, instead of acknowledging something had to be done, I just accepted it.

It's all complicated I suppose. Being fat was just part of who I was and I would be very different now if I had always been normal or thin.

sacha
11-23-2010, 08:49 PM
That a fetus the size of a grain of rice doesn't need 6 slices of pizza to grow!!

shannonmb
11-24-2010, 06:34 AM
I wish I had known that "calorie counting" doesn't automatically mean "900 calories a day, 1200 if you are a total wimp". I basically either tried to eat 900 calories (and would be perfect for 3-6 months before collapsing) or ate whatever I could get my hands on.

Right! When I was a teenager, I thought you had to just pretty much not eat at all to lose weight. THAT didn't last long! Then in the early 90s I thought you had to eat less than 10 fat grams a day. That actually got me down 70lbs, but one trip to New Orleans and THAT was over. Then I thought replacing 2 meals a day with a sugary milkshake was the ONLY way, after all, that feeling of being STARVING must mean I'm on the right track! Too bad that soon went by the wayside as well. I guess bottom line is I thought to lose any meaningful weight there had to be lots of suffering invovled -- and turns out I don't do suffering well! :dizzy:

LillyLover
11-24-2010, 05:46 PM
I wish I had known that it's okay to not finish your entire plate, like others have said. In my family, the generation right before mine (my mother's) grew up incredibly poor in a third world country. While we are all better off now, my mom and her siblings will never forget that. To them, if there is food, you will eat all of it because you're lucky to have it and they have worked hard to get it. However, what I didn't realize was that they live much more active lifestyles than I do, which is why they could eat the same amount as me and yet it wouldn't show on their bodies permanently.

kestrel
11-26-2010, 12:41 AM
That a fetus the size of a grain of rice doesn't need 6 slices of pizza to grow!!
This, x4! :o

vatkins22
11-26-2010, 02:17 AM
i NEVER would have began smoking. this goes along with the plethora of other reasons smoking is bad. i gained lots of weight when i quit!

toobig
11-26-2010, 05:11 PM
I would tell the old me that I deserve to be thin.

PaulaM
11-26-2010, 08:21 PM
I would never have stopped working out. I did it for years and always maintained a slim figure. We moved to CA, I had a three hour a day commute, I went to gyms on and off for 20 years but never with the regularity of the "old" days, so I gained 5 lbs a year and doing that for 20 years is a really bad idea. Since I've been working out at least four times a week I am losing again, my body is smaller looking than the weight it actually is and I feel so much better. I remember a WW leader saying years ago something about choosing not to exercise means choosing to regain weight, guess I should have listened.