100 lb. Club - and we wonder why we have such an obesity epidemic...




matt_H
11-03-2010, 11:17 AM
So I just got some coffee from the kitchen area at work and noticed todays selection of office goodies. Yes, each day there is SOMETHING for free (mostly donuts, cookies, or muffins). Today was a package of "Otis Spunkmeyer banana muffins". Just for curiosity sake, I took a look at the nutritional label. Here, the serving size is "half a muffin" and the count was 220 calories! These are small little muffins and nobody is going to eat a half of one. If you are going to eat a muffin you are going to eat the entire thing and that would be 440 calories alone! How is that even possible that something can be that calorie dense? Its fascinating to me and disturbing at the same time.

What annoys me the most is serving sizes on packages. Why doesn't the FDA require rational serving sizes? If it is a muffin, the serving size should be a muffin. Its a game being played to distort the reality of what you are eating. I'm usually not one for government regulation, but making things rational might help to shock people into seeing the reality of what they are eating.

If we had real labelling maybe we could avoid things like Uno's Chicago grill having an "individual" Uno Classic pizza (small round pizza meant for 1 person) that is listed as 770 calories per serving. However, that individual pizza is listed as 3 serving sizes. A pizza designed for 1 person that is even named "individual" and it is 3 serving sizes?? You eat the entire thing and it is 2310 calories! Almost everyone would be well over their entire calories for the day just eating that one thing.

In the past was food just as caloric but people were sensible enough to eat less? I don't think so. I think food manufacturers are designing foods with as much fat and calories as possible because this is what makes us addicted to them. High fat and extremely high calorie foods are addicting and that is what makes money. Its sad.

So serving sizes are out of wack with reality and food manufacturers are packing in as much calories as humanly possible. I'm surprised the obesity epidemic is not worse.

*rant over*


nelie
11-03-2010, 11:22 AM
I believe the FDA goes by weight so it is the manufacturer that is putting 2 servings in the packaging when they could put 1. It is also the pizza place that is making a claim that a pizza is an 'individual' pizza when it really isn't.

So yeah it is marketing.

PaulaM
11-03-2010, 11:25 AM
Everything you say is so true. I'm old enough to remember the 60s and 70s, portions of everything were so much smaller then. Particularly in restaurants. Not sure exactly when it happened but all of a sudden there were no more 8" dinner plates, every dish you get when you eat out is on a platter! Every drink is bucket size! I have a lot of European friends online, and they are always going on about when they visit America, they bring their entree to the table and it looks enough to feed the whole table.

I think many people don't read the labels on packages, they purposely make them confusing. One thing they have done here in CA is demand that restaurants put "nutrition" info on each table, and I have been shocked. Things I thought were healthy like salads, many times turned out to be higher in calories than getting burgers. If you aren't dieting I guess you don't pay attention to any of this, cause I always see other diners getting appetizers, drinks, huge meals, desserts and more drinks. Lord knows I can eat like a wolf but not all at the same meal.


Sunshine73
11-03-2010, 12:00 PM
I know, right? Just tell me the calories for the whole stinking muffin. Don't try to make it more attractive than it is. Same with those little tubs of ice cream...how many people really divide them into 4 or 5 servings? Maybe 2 but that's about it in my world.

Bunti
11-03-2010, 12:02 PM
I worked in the restaurant business in the 60s-70s, in the California wine country. (Not chain restaurants)

Then most restaurants had soup or salad, relish tray, bread basket, entree, beverage and dessert when you went to dinner. (of course you could order ala carte, but it was not the norm then, as it is now) All freshly prepared. Small soup cups, not alot of cream soups, and certainly not thickened with HFCS fake creamer, which is the norm for cream soups in restaurants now (doesn't break or sour). Salad was on a small plate or bowl, lightly dressed, or with dressing on side-- again no HCFS. Scoop for rice or potatoes was 1/2 cup. Meat portion between 4-7 ounces raw weight, (except steaks, they were always too big) Dinner plate was smaller. Beverage cup was 5 ounces for hot cup, or 8 ounces for cold glass. Of course you could pig out on the bread if you wanted.
Sandwiches had 2-4 ounces of meat if they were deli, hamburgers 4 ounce raw weight, mostly.

I showed a picture of a celebratory dinner out to my kids, and they mentioned that we were drinking from "miniature" cups. Nope, not so...but there wasn't a 12 or 16 ounce container on the table...except the water pitcher.

You used to be a given, always a full water glass or pitcher, they didn't assume everyone would drink a soft drink. BUT we all knew that if you could get them too it was the highest profit item in the building. Cheap, sugar filled, empty nutrition and once addicted folks will pay a dollar or more for a beverage that costs only 3-9 cents a glass to pour.
So, even a celebratory dinner out had some portion control and was made with fresh unadulterated food.

Now, we often think we need monstrous servings of things or it isn't enough.
I am not sure when it happened. I hope we are heading the opposite direction. One size doesn't fit all.

Ciao
11-03-2010, 12:08 PM
http://i845.photobucket.com/albums/ab15/JeMappelleSierra/Photography/divider-2.jpg
I would like it a lot better
if they just put the whole
calorie count on their
products. At my school a
muffin is 350 calories, but
contains 2 servings. It
annoys me a lot that the
product LOOKS good but
that little muffin, which takes
two minutes to eat, is a
dinner's serving. :/
http://i845.photobucket.com/albums/ab15/JeMappelleSierra/Photography/divider-2.jpg

odonnela
11-03-2010, 12:09 PM
I hate it when you buy something that says "100 CALORIES PER SERVING!!!" but then you look and the serving is like a one inch square - not even enough for a child.
This one cracked me up - my husband loves to drink vitamin water and if you read the label it says 2 servings at 0 calories per serving. All I can think is that the "real" calories must be more than 5 so then they could not call it calorie free. But again thats deceptive - what if you drank 10 a day???

cherbear
11-03-2010, 12:16 PM
I totally agree. If you read the book "The End of Overeating," he talks about how the food industry has warped lots of food and put too much sugar/fat/salt in it.

It's an interesting read and speaks to exactally what you're talking about!

findingfawn
11-03-2010, 12:19 PM
Portion sizes always amaze me, how warped our perceptions are on how much we should be eating!

I do agree it's a get 'em hooked marketing scheme from the manufacturers.

JennieGrl
11-03-2010, 12:26 PM
I used to say to myself. oh wow only such a such a calories. never thinking to look at the 'per servings' now i'm so anal about it. and your right. don't put a whole muffin in a package and say serving size half. say the calories for the whole thing. its very deceiving!

Shannon in ATL
11-03-2010, 12:36 PM
I was reading the back of "New Healthy Pizza Bites" from healthy choice or Marie Callender I think, they were sampling them at Target last week. The calorie count was blasted all over the front of the bag. 7 bites in a bag, 4 bites are a serving. And it was a small bag. No one would just eat 4 of those. 650 cals for the entire bag.

I watched half a dozen people get samples and then buy several bags. Some of them talked about it being a good lunch for the kids that were with them. I listened to one boy talk about needing more than one bag for a lunch for him.

Sad.

L144S
11-03-2010, 12:36 PM
In the past was food just as caloric but people were sensible enough to eat less? I don't think so. I think food manufacturers are designing foods with as much fat and calories as possible because this is what makes us addicted to them. High fat and extremely high calorie foods are addicting and that is what makes money. Its sad.

So serving sizes are out of wack with reality and food manufacturers are packing in as much calories as humanly possible. I'm surprised the obesity epidemic is not worse.

I think we moved more! We walked or rode bikes everywhere, we had to go gomeplace for information etc. Part of the problem is how sedintary we have become as a nation. We sit in front of the computer, we have 500 channels on TV instead of the 5 growing up and we never had to go to a gym because we moved all the time! and there was gym or sprots every day at school.

As for serving size there are tons of items that do it, chocolate milk comes to mind because my sons liked it as kids, We have to teach about reading lables for everything. I am not sure they are out of wack per say, but we want bang for our buck and larger packaging is what we look for. Maybe 20 years ago that muffin would have been 1/2 the size....

MindiV
11-03-2010, 12:48 PM
I spluged over the weekend and had a 99 cent bag of Lay's potato chips with a sandwich when we were traveling. I was actually kinda impressed because the bag, which used to say 2 or 2.5 servings at whatever calories, had changed to 1 Serving per bag, 290 calories. I'd heard the FDA was going to try to make manufacturers label multi-serving packages more clearly, but this is the first time I've actually SEEN it.

Ky30
11-03-2010, 12:56 PM
I looked at the mcdonalds information not to long ago and was SHOCKED at how many calories are in a big mac meal and if you super size it you are looking at 2000 calories YIKES

Rosinante
11-03-2010, 01:07 PM
I always have thought that our food was being deliberately made addictive by manufacturers. One Mac or KFC, and I'm lost.

Eliana
11-03-2010, 01:32 PM
The worst example I've seen of this is a caramel apple on a stick. A serving size is half an apple?? On a stick?? When was the last time you shared anything on a stick? LOL!

hhichick
11-03-2010, 01:36 PM
I found some great old restaurant ware at an auction several months back and we use it now as our daily dinnerware. Everything is smaller than you find today - but it all fits actual serving size portions. :)

QuilterInVA
11-03-2010, 01:43 PM
In the "old days" when I was a kid, we didn't eat the huge servings that people expect now. If we were served what is called a muffin now, we'd never have thought of eating the whole thing. We worked a lot harder, too, and didn't sit so much so we burned off what we ate. A huge muffin is not a serving. A 2 or 3 patty burger is not a serving. It's just ime we wake up and realize we are eating way more than our way of life can burn off and go back to smaller portions. The first thing I do in a restaurant is ask for a to go box and then I order my dinner. I put half, or more, of it aside to eat another day. And I'm one of the wierdo's who measures out a half cup of ice cream (4 servings per small container) and enjoy it.

fitkristi
11-03-2010, 01:54 PM
Serving sizes baffle me - I've never understood why Pop Tarts are packaged in sets of 2, but the serving is only 1. Won't the other one go stale? Why aren't they individually packaged?

Rosinante
11-03-2010, 02:10 PM
Here in the uk, the law seems to be that cals etc are given per hundred grammes - regardless of what the product is. Often a serving size or a single item is also given but today I bought some extra special spelt crackers in a health shop.
The cals per 100g was given.
The total pkg weight was given, 200g.
So far so good - but there were 7 crackers in the pkg.
Of course I Can work it out - but doing either (x*2)/7 or (x/3.5) when x = the cals per 100g don't trip off my brain automatically.

milmin2043
11-03-2010, 02:31 PM
Our society was hit with so many changes at once. The obesity epidemic has really only been around for the past 25 years or so.

As previously stated, we don't move enough anymore. We didn't have a car when I grew up. We lived in a small town and walked everywhere. My Mom didn't drive. We walked or rode our bikes to school. We played outside all summer long and only came in to woof down a quick sandwich and back outside we'd go until dark.

We didn't have remote controls for everything or garage door openers or elevators, we took the stairs. We each ate a serving of whatever we had for dinner, and most always had dessert (which was jello or pudding in a small cup).

Also, soft drinks were a luxury and we only had them as a treat once or twice A YEAR! No kidding.

We would go to McDonald's twice a year (in a neighboring town, when we went to the doctor). We would get a hamburger, small fries and a small drink. It was also considered a treat, not something you did every day.

I remember that I loved to go to my friend's house because they had a freezer full of junk food and they watched TV day and night. They were also all overweight for standards at that time. They were the rarity though. They probably weren't even overweight by today's standards.

It's so easy to see what has gone wrong, and truly, wouldn't take that long to turn it around if everyone would get on board. WISHFUL THINKING.

mmel3283
11-03-2010, 02:32 PM
I was shocked and mortified by looking at the nutrition facts for Uno's and some other chain restaurants. My husband wanted to order dinner so I was looking for someplace I could find something to fit in my weight watchers points...to think I used to eat some of those things.

At least Applebees has some okay healthier choices.

fitkristi
11-03-2010, 02:36 PM
Try The Cheesecake Factory - woooo boy, you think Uno's is bad? Cheesecake Factory's kids macaroni & cheese plate has over 1K calories - for a KIDS meal. Seriously? And some of the desserts are just downright outrageous.

nelie
11-03-2010, 02:45 PM
The worst example I've seen of this is a caramel apple on a stick. A serving size is half an apple?? On a stick?? When was the last time you shared anything on a stick? LOL!

A few years ago, my mom had some caramel apples that she bought. We shared an apple and ate 1/4 of it each. The stick is useful for dipping.

nelie
11-03-2010, 02:48 PM
I know, right? Just tell me the calories for the whole stinking muffin. Don't try to make it more attractive than it is. Same with those little tubs of ice cream...how many people really divide them into 4 or 5 servings? Maybe 2 but that's about it in my world.

I do but I also calculate out the calories for the entire thing just so I know how many calories I'd be eating total. "Hmm it is a treat, I'd get 3 or 4 servings from it, it'll cost me xx per serving, yyy total"

nelie
11-03-2010, 02:50 PM
Oh and my funny realization was many years ago before I lost weight. I wanted to buy a pot pie to eat for dinner. I looked at the frozen pot pies in the grocery store, it was 1200 calories for the pot pie. And the box wasn't even that big.

rockinrobin
11-03-2010, 02:57 PM
This is why I take the time to cook the vast majority of my meals at home.

I get so much food at home for so few calories. The taste? Scrumptious.

It's like they sprinkle *extra calorie sauce* on all restaurant meals. Some of these foods are just so caloric, it would almost seem as if there is no other explanation.

mandalinn82
11-03-2010, 03:02 PM
Robin, if by "extra calorie sauce" you mean "copious amounts of oil and butter", you'd be correct.

Even the heavy cream in restaurants is higher fat than heavy cream from stores..."double cream", they call it. It's why those cream soups in restaurants are so much creamier than you can achieve at home (too creamy in my opinion...I hate taking a bite of soup and feeling the oil slick of too much cream spread across my tongue).

calluna
11-03-2010, 03:05 PM
And they cover the extra calorie sauce with a sodium wash, and then sprinkle the whole thing with cheese.

rockinrobin
11-03-2010, 03:34 PM
And they cover the extra calorie sauce with a sodium wash, and then sprinkle the whole thing with cheese.

And infuse it with crushed Halavah (the most calorie dense food I've ever heard of).

What's even scarier to me, is that I never, ever gave a second thought to all of those calories I was ingesting, even if I didn't realize they were *that* high, I knew they were plenty high.

nelie
11-03-2010, 03:36 PM
Well I know many people bake for themselves but to me, muffins are high calorie whether or not you make them yourself. I have made 'healthier' muffins which are lower calorie and healthier but still, they are generally I rather go without. I am glad that I don't like baking.

And even things like muffin tins are huge.

matt_H
11-03-2010, 04:03 PM
I'm curious Robin and now have to google "halavah". ;)

Ciao
11-03-2010, 04:05 PM
I looked at the mcdonalds information not to long ago and was SHOCKED at how many calories are in a big mac meal and if you super size it you are looking at 2000 calories YIKES

http://i845.photobucket.com/albums/ab15/JeMappelleSierra/Photography/divider-2.jpg
A very big place to eat around
where I live is Chipotle. A single
burrito, depending on what you
get on it, can be about 2,500
calories WITH 2,500-4,000mg of
sodium. You may as well just go
drink salt water.

My friends were shocked that I've
never tried Chipotle. And after reading
the nutrition info, I don't think I
ever will. It's ridiculous.
http://i845.photobucket.com/albums/ab15/JeMappelleSierra/Photography/divider-2.jpg

matt_H
11-03-2010, 04:10 PM
Ciao,

You can save a ridiculous amount of calories by getting your chipotle burrito in a bowl and getting it without sour cream or guacomole (those are extra cost anyway). The tortilla wrap contains way too many calories.

nelie
11-03-2010, 04:23 PM
Chipotle is one of my favorite low calorie places to eat. I can get a pretty filling meal for 300-400 calories. I don't do burritos usually but if I do, I split them with my husband.

rockinrobin
11-03-2010, 04:48 PM
I'm curious Robin and now have to google "halavah". ;)

Fitday lists an 8 oz bar at 1146 calories. This is one of my husbands favorite foods. He often brought it home and we'd polish off a MUCH larger bar in no time at all.

Gale02
11-03-2010, 05:04 PM
Wow, from what I've seen Halvah is honey and crushed sesame seeds infused with butter. Talk about a calorie bomb!! It does sound pretty tasty though, if I may say so. :)

hhichick
11-03-2010, 05:06 PM
I like Chipotle because you can get just what you want and choose how many calories you'd like your meal to be.

ubergirl
11-03-2010, 06:29 PM
This thing about things foods being packaged to look like single serving foods, but then having multiple servings in them, as in Matt's pizza example, is a HUGE PET PEEVE of mine. I always check it carefully, but it is totally misleading and not fair to consumers.

I have to say that I really don't enjoy restaurant food any more. Even when I order what I think will be the least calorific item on the menu, it's always somehow doused and doctored to be made high calorie-- grilled salmon is ALWAYS grilled salmon drowned in butter.

Asherdoodles87
11-03-2010, 07:03 PM
Weight watchers has some yummy muffins for 190 calories or less. The WHOLE muffin. ;) I eat the blueberry kind occasionally.

It is amazing the way some company's label the calories. It should be for the total package or item. There are probably a lot of consumers that are eating more servings then they think. I like that coca-cola has started putting the total calories on a 20oz of soda. It is 240 for the bottle. I think more companies should follow their example. ;)

I also think there needs to be more public awareness of how to read a nutrition label, and how to calculate the calories for people who have no health or nutrition knowledge.

SouthLake
11-03-2010, 07:04 PM
I drive an SUV with two large cupholders in the cneter console. Nothign to bump into them or steal any space. And yet the MEDIUM soft drink from your average fst food restaurant won't fit unless they have the notched bottom. I'm only 24 and even I remember when a super size was the size of today's small. What's next? A horse trough?

Right now we're in the process of moving and were painting the house last night. My sister and brother in law went through the Jack in the Box drive thru and it was a perfect example of why America keeps getting fatter. "Do you want fries with that?" followed by "would you like a cheesecake to go with your meal?" and at the pay window a poster with a chocolate lava cake that said "If it fits in your bag it fits in your stomach"

Eek.

audri8301
11-03-2010, 07:19 PM
I like Chipotle because you can get just what you want and choose how many calories you'd like your meal to be.

I do this at Moe's, but even then you have to be careful. I went the other day and the guy making my food put in two scoops of beans and two scoops of chicken even though I didn't ask for them. He probably thought he was being nice, but doubling those two items adds A LOT of calories to the meal.

Ruby Tuesday has some good choices. They have added a lot of vegetable based sides to their menu and list calories for a lot of the items.

SCraver
11-03-2010, 08:39 PM
I calculated once that a Cinabon with extra frosting and a 8 oz lass of whole milk was an entire days worth of weight watcher points. I think it worked out to 1200 or so calories. I could eat one just for snack. Most have gone out of business around here. I haven't had one in probably close to 10 years.

krampus
11-03-2010, 08:52 PM
For all the complaining I do about the high cost of living, New York State now requires all chain restaurants to print calorie counts of the WHOLE ENTREE on their menus. None of this "ONLY 300 CALORIES PER SERVING!" BS on a 12-serving dinner plate with its own zip code.

At restaurants here in Japan I have to be careful not to go overboard, and whenever I go home to the US my head explodes at how rich restaurant food is and how colossally enormous the portions are. I am sick for days whenever I visit.

I say this constantly but man, am I worried about gaining back my losses when I move back.

StarGetsFit
11-03-2010, 09:16 PM
In the past was food just as caloric but people were sensible enough to eat less? I don't think so. I think food manufacturers are designing foods with as much fat and calories as possible because this is what makes us addicted to them. High fat and extremely high calorie foods are addicting and that is what makes money. Its sad.

Actually, while there is some adding of fat and calories to make us addicted going on, a lot of it had to do with the sedentary lives modern people live. I've researched it before (but don't have links handy) and in 1800 the average Parisian was eating a little over 3,000 calories per day. The average pioneer/homesteader was eating between 5-6,000 calories per day. In the 1880's the average day laborer walked seven miles to work, then another seven back home. Children were often walking 2-3 mile to school each day than back again.

The chores, labor, and lack of mechanized transportation in the past meant that our bodies were used to consuming massive amounts of calories to support the massive amount of physical activity everyday life demanded. Our bodies are made to efficiently burn large amounts of calories, we just no longer move around enough for them to do it.

Petite Powerhouse
11-03-2010, 09:19 PM
I recently ran across this:

http://health.yahoo.net/experts/eatthis/worst-restaurant-breakfasts-america

The Cheesecake Factory breakfast really surprised me, and I am not easily surprised by caloric values in this country. Seriously: 2,460 calories, 61 grams of saturated fat, and almost 1,800 milligrams of sodium? For breakfast? What's for dinner: a triple bypass?

I might—might—have guessed about 2,100 calories for that breakfast if there were enough filling between each piece of french toast.

krampus
11-04-2010, 01:40 AM
Unbelievable! What blows my mind is that there are somehow 570 calories in the mushroom, spinach and goat cheese scramble that is listed as an "Eat This Instead!" Unless they are pumping that scramble with lard or using an entire block of goat cheese and 10 eggs...

Eliana
11-04-2010, 07:26 AM
Wow. That french toast thing doesn't even look all that big, judging from the picture. What on earth did they do to it?

RoseRodent
11-04-2010, 07:48 AM
I always thought that something that would make a huge impact is instead of just the nutrition information is large lettering on the FRONT of each package saying "this product makes up x% of the average daily intake for a man/woman/child". Not sure people would be so quick to indulge in that packet of chips if it said in large cigarette-packet style lettering "this packet makes up 120% of your total daily requirement".

And yes, totally agree that serving sizes should have legislation that forces them to show a serving someone can reasonably eat, and that if something is packaged in individual wrap for the implied purpose of eating a whole one then the serving should always be a whole one. Instant noodles (I believe often called Ramen in the US) here have nutrition info shown per half pack. Who is going to go out and buy instant noodles that you open a packet and microwave them and then is thinking they are going to eat half a packet?

Here in the UK there was talk of legislation to prevent large servings of 'bad' foods such as King Size candy bars, so the manufacturers entered into an agreement between themselves (it's common here to avoid legislation by having a code of practice instead) to allude to sharing on any large packs. King Size bars were replaced with "2 in a pack" and all large packets of candy now read "great for sharing" or "sharing size", and advertising for large packs must refer to you sharing them out. It's not quite hit every area of the trade because it's a voluntary code, but because the large players like Cadbury and Mars subscribe to it the government no longer wants to get involved.

cestlavie22
11-04-2010, 08:26 AM
a good book about this topic is Mindless eating: whey we eat more than we think. by brian wansink. He looks at different restaurant practices, packaging, practices, etc. that are designed t make us spend more and eat more. It is a fun and fascinating read...

rockinrobin
11-04-2010, 08:35 AM
I always thought that something that would make a huge impact is instead of just the nutrition information is large lettering on the FRONT of each package saying "this product makes up x% of the average daily intake for a man/woman/child". Not sure people would be so quick to indulge in that packet of chips if it said in large cigarette-packet style lettering "this packet makes up 120% of your total daily requirement".



That would be interesting and may prove helpful for some (which IS better than none). But unfortunately, just like many people ignore cigarette warnings, many would ignore this as well.

For me, back in the day it would have not been a deterrent. But for those who are truly ignorant, and just aren't aware, and actually WANT to know, it may prove beneficial.

Would be nice if the food industry decided to do folks a big favor and halt the practice of super sizing and cooking with the idea of "the more calories we can pack in there, the better". Ahhh, to dream...

summershine
11-04-2010, 08:53 AM
oh oh oh oh! They kind of do that on Australian food labelling. Of course, they still have ridiculous serving sizes (3.2 servings per a 590mL bottle of pepsi?!), but they also have the dietary intake per 100mg/mL, so while you might not be sure how much you're consuming, it's easier to compare with other products.

There's also another type of measurement that lots of foods are bringing in to go on the front of the label (though unfortunately, scarce few foods in my cupboard atm have them >_>).

(apologies for the crappy ipod pic of my milk :P)
http://i56.tinypic.com/2aioade.jpg
(underneath the thingies it says "per 250mL serve")

as you can see it has energy % (next to the asterisk for energy it says "based on an intake of 8700 a day your intake needs may be lower blah blah blah") and calcium %, and things like biscuits and cereal have a lot more for things like fibre, protein, sodium, sugar, etc etc

Thighs Be Gone
11-04-2010, 09:17 AM
What gets me is that food seems to be part of EVERYTHING--especially for the kids! Why on earth does my child need a snack for a one hour Girl Scout meeting? Why are there cookies given to her after a one hour cheerleading practice? Of course, it is NEVER bags of carrots or apples or even a cheese stick. Instead, Oreos and candies are doled out. There is even daily snack time at school for the 3rd Grade! I don't get it! You feed them breakfast at 7. They eat lunch at 11:30 and they get out at 3. WTH?

The adult world is the same. Rarely do I see healthy offerings next to coffee or on the potluck table. It's as if the whole world is yelling.."here, pick me and get fat and feel like crap!"

Thighs Be Gone
11-04-2010, 09:21 AM
I recently ran across this:

http://health.yahoo.net/experts/eatthis/worst-restaurant-breakfasts-america

The Cheesecake Factory breakfast really surprised me, and I am not easily surprised by caloric values in this country. Seriously: 2,460 calories, 61 grams of saturated fat, and almost 1,800 milligrams of sodium? For breakfast? What's for dinner: a triple bypass?

I might—might—have guessed about 2,100 calories for that breakfast if there were enough filling between each piece of french toast.


That makes me sick to consider but CC Factory is always loaded. The thing is--especially for breakfast items--you can have some super delicious stuff for 1/4 of the calories and one that won't give you a heart attack down the road. All the restaurants are great at doing this! They pour butter and sugar all over everything--or better yet serving everything on gargantuan beds of white rice or french fries. After all, it's cheaper than offering lean cuts of meat or more fresh fruits and veggies.

matt_H
11-04-2010, 10:15 AM
Wow. That french toast thing doesn't even look all that big, judging from the picture. What on earth did they do to it?

Yeah, that looked tiny. The miracle of food science to fit well over a days worth of calories into a couple of pieces of french toast.

matt_H
11-04-2010, 10:21 AM
This really bugs the **** out of me and its such an American thing now. I go to alot of meetings and conferences and EVERY ONE is catered. If it is not a meal time, why the **** do you think you should have food provided? Morning meetings have donuts and muffins, afternoon meetings have sandwiches and cookies, etc. etc.

If you put the food there, people will eat it whether or not they have already ate it. The psychology is that it is free you better not pass it up.

What gets me is that food seems to be part of EVERYTHING--especially for the kids! Why on earth does my child need a snack for a one hour Girl Scout meeting? Why are there cookies given to her after a one hour cheerleading practice? Of course, it is NEVER bags of carrots or apples or even a cheese stick. Instead, Oreos and candies are doled out. There is even daily snack time at school for the 3rd Grade! I don't get it! You feed them breakfast at 7. They eat lunch at 11:30 and they get out at 3. WTH?

The adult world is the same. Rarely do I see healthy offerings next to coffee or on the potluck table. It's as if the whole world is yelling.."here, pick me and get fat and feel like crap!"

carter
11-04-2010, 10:35 AM
I love eating at restaurants - not chain restaurants so much but lovely bistros and excellent ethnic restaurants. I always presume there is something like 3-4 times as much fat in the dish than what I would use in cooking the same thing.

The other night I was out to dinner, and I ordered a tuna sashimi appetizer and a side dish of green beans (no entree). The green beans were stellar - really fresh and tasty and perfectly roasted, but man were they ever dripping in oil. If I roasted string beans I'd use 1-2 tablespoons of olive oil on a pound of string beans, and they'd come out fairly dry (not in a bad way, just not swimming in oil). I enjoyed the dish, but I had to take into account, for calorie counting, that there was just a **** of lot more fat than I would use at home.

Oh, on the subject of halvah - my partner and I sometimes get fresh halvah at the middle eastern grocery, and I slice off a 100-150 calorie piece - more or less a nice little 1" cube. It takes some effort not to gobble down more of it but it is so sweet and rich that it doesn't set me off to pigging out the way some other treats might.

runningfromfat
11-04-2010, 10:45 AM
I recently ran across this:

http://health.yahoo.net/experts/eatthis/worst-restaurant-breakfasts-america

The Cheesecake Factory breakfast really surprised me, and I am not easily surprised by caloric values in this country. Seriously: 2,460 calories, 61 grams of saturated fat, and almost 1,800 milligrams of sodium? For breakfast? What's for dinner: a triple bypass?

I might—might—have guessed about 2,100 calories for that breakfast if there were enough filling between each piece of french toast.

That is so upsetting! One thing that I've found is that I can still enjoy delicious foods as long as I cut them in a healthy way. For instance, we had hamburgers last night that were absolutely scrumptuous! We bought lean beef and then had them without buns on a bed of baby spinach, salsa, onions and advocados with a about an oz of melted cheddar on top. They were so good! We still eat pizza too but we spilt one thin, whole wheat crust veggie covered frozen pizza and eat a large salad with it. We're all full and get to enjoy what we love.

Yeah, that looked tiny. The miracle of food science to fit well over a days worth of calories into a couple of pieces of french toast.

ITA!! It doesn't have any real protein with it so I'm sure you'd feel really hungry afterwards too!

Oh how I wish it was easier to find restaurants that cooked well and made great tasting meals with low calories.


-----------------------------------

I should add that the way calories are displayed is exactly like how prices are shown in the US. A hamburger is listed at $9.99 on the menu but it doesn't include tax and tip so it looks a lot cheaper than it really is. We're doing the same with food. It's not a big surprise people are so bad at spending money and being overweight with the way the system is set up. SURE you can calculate it yourself but few take the time to do that. Why can't we just list the actual calories for an ENTIRE meal or the ENTIRE price? :?:


------------------------------------------------


Seriously... can someone here just make a nice restaurant that does everything the right way?

Eliana
11-04-2010, 11:40 AM
If you put the food there, people will eat it whether or not they have already ate it. The psychology is that it is free you better not pass it up.

I used to have the hardest time with this, and I hate value meals because of it. You can only get the "value" if you're ordering a drink. I drink WATER. And I prefer it free from the tap. I always felt like I had to have a soda because I was paying for it. Not any more. I'll pay the extra money for my health.

When my kids were tiny, I remember going to Golden Corral and ordering water with their meals. The cashier said, "The kids drinks are free."

I responded with, "That's ok. They'll have water."

She said, "But it's free."

I responded, "Yes, I understand that. They'll have water."

Then she stared at me as if I wasn't speaking or comprehending English. "Yes...but...it's...free."

:rolleyes:

runningfromfat
11-04-2010, 11:42 AM
I used to have the hardest time with this, and I hate value meals because of it. You can only get the "value" if you're ordering a drink. I drink WATER. And I prefer it free from the tap. I always felt like I had to have a soda because I was paying for it. Not any more. I'll pay the extra money for my health.

I've had problems with this too in the US. One lady thought I was crazy for not wanting a pop. In Germany they normally offer seltzer water, which I'm a big fan of. It's great because I get my "treat" but it's just water... with bubbles. :D

RoseRodent
11-04-2010, 11:50 AM
Morning meetings have donuts and muffins, afternoon meetings have sandwiches and cookies, etc. etc.

If you put the food there, people will eat it whether or not they have already ate it. The psychology is that it is free you better not pass it up.

I confess that free food is my nemesis! :( At least in the UK we are not quite there, we get a modest little packet of 2 cookies, but that's still a lot of excess calories.

We just aren't set up for any aspect of this society. Mechanised lifestyles are part of it, but it's such a complex situation. In olden times food that triggered your pleasure response (a natural part of the human brain to encourage you to eat calorie-dense foods) came few and far between. Fruit came once a year and was then not replaceable, you could reflect wistfully on the joys of the apple season, but there were no apples until the apple season no matter how much you wanted one. Foods was not replaceable. For all but the poorest among us in the western world if you accidentally (!) eat the whole packet of cookies today there will be more food tomorrow. Our ancestors knew that if they ate the whole sack of corn there would be starvation when it was gone, not that they'd have to go back to the store. Food took a long, long time to work at and you really couldn't cook more than a few batches of it each day because it was several hours' work to put on each meal. Meals were the same over and over and over again and no food marketing. You weren't that thrilled to see another pie, but at least it was a pie not nothing.

Now we have foods which know how to trigger our pleasure responses, people concentrating on making sure we take up that food for their financial reward. They know that impulse purchases are the real swing, that in terms of ordinary groceries you are unlikely to impulse purchase a grapefruit but you may pick up a brand new candy bar, and if they can make you impulse buy then you'll buy more altogether. We learned to preserve and transport food, so you can have fruits all year round. We learned to refine foods - I am often struck by the similar journey that sugar and cocaine go on to become a refined substance that triggers our pleasure centres in a way in which it was never truly designed to be stimulated.

Petite Powerhouse
11-04-2010, 12:25 PM
Wow. That french toast thing doesn't even look all that big, judging from the picture. What on earth did they do to it?

This is the ultimate horror of it. Not only does the breakfast have 2,460 calories, but:

1) It isn't very big.
2) Other than fat, it doesn't contain much in the way of the components of food that keep you full.
3) The sugar in it will make you crave more sugar.

All of this combined means you might have room not only for dinner but even for lunch after eating that. And even if you don't have room, you may crave more "food" anyway.

It's this in addition to its general unhealthiness that makes restaurant food and fast food places so dangerous. This food can get a person stuck in a cycle of eating more such high-calorie food lacking in nutrition throughout the day. The stomach and the brain never get full for long.

I think it is unconscionable that this kind of thing is served in restaurants across the map every day.

shcirerf
11-04-2010, 11:18 PM
-----------------------------------



$9.99 for a hamburger!? *faints* Where do you live? Our corner pub serves a mushroom swiss cheeseburger and fries for $5.75 on Monday, $6.75 regular, excluding tax and tip is optional. A mug of fresh brewed ice tea is .75. And the burger comes with pickle and onion! They do patty their own burgers and use 85/15 so if you skip the cheese and fries, it's not great, but not the worst choice.

I do agree food labeling is terribly deceiving and most folks don't pay any attention. One thing that bugs me is seeing parents in the quick trip feeding their kids chocolate milk and donuts for breakfast! :?: Of course they have a big Mountain Dew and a cinnamon roll. (I stop to buy the paper).

I was in the grocery store yesterday, looking for something, I don't know what, Just something, reasonably healthy and fast, but spent a lot of time reading nutrition labels. AAKKK! Headed back to the fruit and veggie section.

It is no wonder our nation is fat, but it's also no wonder children act like they do, pumped full of sugar, preservatives, additives, and God knows what. They don't need drugs, they need good wholesome food!

rockinrobin
11-05-2010, 07:13 AM
This is the ultimate horror of it. Not only does the breakfast have 2,460 calories, but:

1) It isn't very big.
2) Other than fat, it doesn't contain much in the way of the components of food that keep you full.
3) The sugar in it will make you crave more sugar.

All of this combined means you might have room not only for dinner but even for lunch after eating that. And even if you don't have room, you may crave more "food" anyway.

It's this in addition to its general unhealthiness that makes restaurant food and fast food places so dangerous. This food can get a person stuck in a cycle of eating more such high-calorie food lacking in nutrition throughout the day. The stomach and the brain never get full for long.

I think it is unconscionable that this kind of thing is served in restaurants across the map every day.

They are basically serving up drugs on a plate. TOTALLY unconscionable.

How did it ever begin? Who was the first to say "this is okay"? :(

It not only makes me sad, it makes me angry.

runningfromfat
11-05-2010, 07:39 AM
-----------------------------------



$9.99 for a hamburger!? *faints* Where do you live? Our corner pub serves a mushroom swiss cheeseburger and fries for $5.75 on Monday, $6.75 regular, excluding tax and tip is optional. A mug of fresh brewed ice tea is .75. And the burger comes with pickle and onion! They do patty their own burgers and use 85/15 so if you skip the cheese and fries, it's not great, but not the worst choice.

I do agree food labeling is terribly deceiving and most folks don't pay any attention. One thing that bugs me is seeing parents in the quick trip feeding their kids chocolate milk and donuts for breakfast! :?: Of course they have a big Mountain Dew and a cinnamon roll. (I stop to buy the paper).

I was in the grocery store yesterday, looking for something, I don't know what, Just something, reasonably healthy and fast, but spent a lot of time reading nutrition labels. AAKKK! Headed back to the fruit and veggie section.

It is no wonder our nation is fat, but it's also no wonder children act like they do, pumped full of sugar, preservatives, additives, and God knows what. They don't need drugs, they need good wholesome food!

we live in Manhattan... so the $9.99 for a hamburger is probably an underestimate if anything! ;)

Yes and I also totally agree with what parents are feeding kids. It can be scary! DD very, very rarely gets sugar (she got a very small pack of mini-oreos for Halloween at that was is and that's probably the most sugar she's gotten in a sitting in her whole life!). Yet I have seen parents with kids that are the same age given them pop, huge ice cream cones or happy meals.

My mom used to feed me so much junk and it obviously set me up for bad habits later on. :(

susiemartin
11-05-2010, 08:23 AM
How did it ever begin? Who was the first to say "this is okay"? :(

Not to be an ag history geek or get on my soap box :soap: ....but.....

It began after WWII on the farm.

With cheap petroleum, farm debt, big government subsidies and the advent of affordable TV, the American "lifestyle" changed.
For the first time in the history of the world food became CHEAP

By the late'60's to early '70's women were beginning to work outside the home and home cooked from scratch meals were being replaced with "convenience foods" and "fast food".
Home gardens & canning became passe and a "lost art". Gluttony was no longer a sin ( neither was avarice,greed, lust or whatever)
Adults were now eating bought lunches instead of carrying lunch from home. Children in government schools were eating carb & fat rich school lunches (or bringing junk food from home) and not walking to school (school buses were now for all kids). It was okay for kids to watch TV and not play out doors.

At that time U.S. food prices were becoming a political hot potato. At the behest of Richard Nixon, Ag Secretary Earl Butz (Mr. Get Big Or Get Out) revolutionized grain production in the U.S. He's the father of so called "Cheap Food" and industrialized factory farming. We can thank him for HFCS :devil:

So now a days, instead of spending more than 30% of our income on food we spend less than 10%.

You can be sure that if people would throw out their TV's & PC/MAC's; and if all ag subsidies from Washington ended; and if WE THE PEOPLE had to pay what food really cost to produce
(i.e milk about $14 a gallon, bread $9 a loaf, eggs maybe $ 10 a doz.)
there would a lot less obesity in America and we'd all be healthier and have lots more money in our pockets.......
Whew! Glad I got that off my chest................:D

RoseRodent
11-05-2010, 09:31 AM
My mom used to feed me so much junk and it obviously set me up for bad habits later on. :(

I had the opposite - almost! My mum gave us so much "health" food and everything was diet, diet, diet and I was not EVER allowed to have candy and fries and things. I actually didn't know what McDonalds was until I was 10 years old! But seeing others all having these things I was never allowed piqued my curiosity about it and I wanted to understand why they all got to eat it and I didn't, and they were still skinny anyway. But worst of all was knowing my mum was bingeing away in what she thought was "secret" - in her room, in teh car, at work, anywhere she could get away with it. All those egg McMuffin boxes - she got it and we didn't. That was a huge rebellion for me, so I do try to work treats into my daughter's diet also, to help her to understand the balance to be struck, yes you may treat yourself, no you cannot treat yoursel every single day. And for me the most important adjustment is to eat something nice and think "that was nice, I enjoyed it" rather than "that was nice, I'll have more" so that I can enjoy treats for what they are - something nice that you have every now and then and then stop!

synger
11-05-2010, 11:12 AM
Unbelievable! What blows my mind is that there are somehow 570 calories in the mushroom, spinach and goat cheese scramble that is listed as an "Eat This Instead!" Unless they are pumping that scramble with lard or using an entire block of goat cheese and 10 eggs...

That doesn't actually surprise me. Most omelets are 3 eggs, and that's almost 300 calories right there. Two ounces of cheese will give you the rest.

synger
11-05-2010, 11:22 AM
That would be interesting and may prove helpful for some (which IS better than none). But unfortunately, just like many people ignore cigarette warnings, many would ignore this as well.

For me, back in the day it would have not been a deterrent. But for those who are truly ignorant, and just aren't aware, and actually WANT to know, it may prove beneficial.

Would be nice if the food industry decided to do folks a big favor and halt the practice of super sizing and cooking with the idea of "the more calories we can pack in there, the better". Ahhh, to dream...

I tend to disagree. I think that those who are truly ignorant, and just aren't aware, don't actually want to know. Those who want to know already read labels.

Maybe some of it is not realizing how many calories one should eat, or thinking the label is "too hard" to understand. But the labels of today are pretty straight-forward, IMO.

I don't have much sympathy for those who express shock at the calorie counts of this or that food, but then keep on eating them. And complain that they keep getting bigger. /sigh

THe reason portions are bigger and bigger is that customers demand it. We expect to get a lot of food for our money. Fast food, diners, even "family style" restaurants like Denny's, Applebees, Uno's etc... they have to give large portions or they lose customers.

Yeah, it's hard for those of us "in the know" to pick and choose among the minefields of eating out. But I've never found a place where I can't find SOMETHING that fits my plan, and I can always eat only half.

Ultimately, it's up to me what kind and how much food I shovel into my face. It's not the restaurant's fault, or the labels' fault, or the food manufacturer's fault.

LindseyLou
11-05-2010, 11:58 AM
It's really sad, if you just go to the grocery store and see all the calories/fat/salt that is in these foods! I agree, it's surprising that our world isn't more obese!

I love when my husband tells me he'd like to take me out to dinner to treat me...very thoughtful and sweet...and I look at the menu and a SALAD is 1400 calories! What's even more sad, is I think a lot of people would think the salad is the safe, healthy choice! And it's packed with all those calories and 30 grams of fat!

I think our grocery stores should be filled with healthy choices and restaurants should be serving healthier options. Some do, but majority of them don't it seems like. So, I have like 2 or 3 options for going out to eat! :/

rockinrobin
11-05-2010, 12:07 PM
I love when my husband tells me he'd like to take me out to dinner to treat me...very thoughtful and sweet...and I look at the menu and a SALAD is 1400 calories! What's even more sad, is I think a lot of people would think the salad is the safe, healthy choice! And it's packed with all those calories and 30 grams of fat!
:/

This reminds me of my birthday.. Lots of people would choose that day to have a splurge meal in a restaurant, but not me. For me no matter what, the biggest treat is eating a wonderful, delicious full, voluminous, healthy meal, cooked at home, though I wouldn't mind if someone else was cooking it ;).

My birthday is a week away and it will be my 5th birthday since overhauling my lifestyle and for the first 4 I stayed perfectly on plan, looking forward to number 5 being the same.

I have had more than my share of planned (& unplanned) splurges throughout the years, but that day is a day to give myself the perfect gift and to eat in *my usual* healthy manner. Weird, I know. :dizzy:

lottie63
11-05-2010, 02:13 PM
Robin that is great! That is what I"m doing this year too and totally how I look at it. :)

RoseRodent
11-05-2010, 03:26 PM
THe reason portions are bigger and bigger is that customers demand it.

Yes, the same reason that there is more salt in food and more sugar in food. Now even when weight loss was not remotely on my agenda I found food portions too big, most htings too salty or too sweet. I queried it to be told that customers demand it, so I'd ask if they made a note of my demands to go the other way, have more lighter options. They said they didn't keep track of these letters. Go against the herd and you will not be heard.

It's a vicious cycle, the more salt you put in food the more people will become accustomed to salt and demand more salt. We are so very price averse in the UK and US, and it drives me out of my head that all the food in our store gets cheaper and cheaper as they fill it with "new recipe" cheap gunge. When I used to live in France people were more than happy to pay whatever it took for good quality food and I stayed at my goal weight with no effort at all!

Petite Powerhouse
11-05-2010, 03:58 PM
See, I don't think the blame can be solely placed on either party.

1) Yes, as a people we need to be better educated about food. So, why aren't we? Why isn't this a mandatory part of school programs? And why is physical education one of the first things to be cut from school programs when the money gets tight? I don't think we can expect all people to understand all the ins and outs of what they eat without someone helping them to figure things out. Did I figure it out on my own? Yes. I did a lot of research, I read books, I watched programs. I've always been interested in health. But I think it's a bit of a utopian ideal to imagine that every person will go to these lengths or even know where to begin. So, what then? We just let those who struggle to educate themselves fail?

2) Yes, people like to order junk at restaurants. And sometimes when fast food places offer healthy alternatives those end up being removed from the menu because no one buys them. Does that mean these establishments are not at fault? I say no. They could make more appealing healthy options; and they could absolutely make the food that isn't good for you better for you than it currently is without sacrificing the dubious taste that people like. I mean, really: Is it absolutely necessary to put sooooo much butter and oil and lard and whatnot in a recipe that the calories top 2,000? Isn't it conceivable that people could like the meal being offered if a little more attention were paid to the ingredients list?

Absolutely I think people share in the responsibility. We do have power over our health. We can choose to take control when we find ourselves gaining weight, and at that point we absolutely can do everything in our power to learn what we need to in order to turn things around for ourselves. But doesn't society at large share in this responsibility to some degree? And doesn't it benefit us all to live in a society where people are healthy and fit? Shouldn't we do whatever possible to help make this happen?

RoseRodent
11-05-2010, 05:03 PM
Profit margins can share some of the blame, it's easy to make food taste "better" to a majority audience by adding butter and sugar and it's very cheap. If you start adding a variety of spices, lean meat cuts, fresh vegetables then your margins really suffer.

Regulations leave a lot to be desired also, in European law "100% beef" may include beef fat that is not native to the original cut of meat, so the claims of 100% beef hamburgers actually have fat added to keep costs down.

vdander24
11-08-2010, 12:42 PM
Good Thing... at least we are being told, so we have the choice. Bad news, even the "healthy" drinks and foods, like juice have something like 2.5 servings in a bottle. I thought I was making a better choice than soda, drank the bottle, then looked to realized I had used up a meal serving because I wanted something different than water!!!!! Make sure to read the bottle, before you buy!

Luminous
11-08-2010, 09:05 PM
At that time U.S. food prices were becoming a political hot potato. At the behest of Richard Nixon, Ag Secretary Earl Butz (Mr. Get Big Or Get Out) revolutionized grain production in the U.S. He's the father of so called "Cheap Food" and industrialized factory farming. We can thank him for HFCS :devil:

So now a days, instead of spending more than 30% of our income on food we spend less than 10%.

Yup. My dad remembers that. He said they were told to begin planting "fencerow to fencerow." The current food policy, which is basically from the early 1970s to the present, is focused on making food as cheap as possible — more calorie bang for the buck, no matter the nutrition content. Why? People don't complain too much politically if they can afford to put supper on the table, that's why.

It's also designed, after a fashion, to keep family farming sustainable as a profession, but I think a lot of that vision got eaten up by conglomerates like ADM taking over and running the show, and getting themselves a lot of the benefits intended for small family farmers.

HFCS sucks, but my dad grows corn that goes into it. Just remember not to blame the farmers, but to blame the policy that paints farmers into corners!

krampus
11-08-2010, 10:19 PM
Health and nutrition education is a tough topic to tackle. It could backfire like abstinence-only sex ed programs, with people feeling rebellious and angry ("I don't care if it's bad for me, it tastes good" etc) and disobeying what they're taught. I remember in school we had mandatory health class and they taught us all about the food pyramid, balanced diets, and how most of what we eat should be "real food" and not junk. But it went in one ear and out the other. At that age my bad habits had already formed. I craved full-fat chocolate milk and fettucine Alfredo and I never worried about my weight even though P.E. was humiliating because of it.

Some people are willfully ignorant or refuse to believe the truth or simply lack the willpower to change their habits. Others may change their minds more easily if they were to read statistics on nutrition, calories etc. in beloved restaurant and fast food meals. I have no potential cures for this ailment, but I'm really worried about the state of the nation. How can everyone get help that will work for them?

starfishkitty
11-08-2010, 10:51 PM
You know, I couldn't have ranted about this better myself............ my feelings exactly Matt H! It's just... MIND BLOWING.

I marvel at the people (mostly young guys) that come into my store and buy these absolutely horrible foods and are stick thin. Like I'm talkin 2 for $1.00 honeybuns that are 600 calories a piece... and they'll eat both! Heck, in the past..... I probably did too!!! It's CRAZY.

RobinD
11-09-2010, 02:03 AM
Today was my pre-op checkup before my surgery Thursday. We had to be there early, and being the AWESOME morning person I ain't, we ran out the door without breakfast. We're sitting in the waiting room and across from us was a cafeteria, so I sent my hubby over for coffee. He brought back a HUGE blueberry muffin with crumbly brown sugary stuff on the top. And a knife to halve it with. I didn't eat it. I had a sausage/egg/cheese/english muffin sandwich that was probably every bit as fattening, but at least it had protein and not all sugary carbs. It was filling, it was delicious, and I didn't eat that damned sugar pill, yay me! Gave me some wicked gas, but that seemed par for the day I was having, lol.

That egg sandwich was the closest thing to healthy that cafeteria had - it was all pastries and sugared cereal in little boxes. And all three of the nurses I saw today were obese. :-(

ValRock
11-09-2010, 04:58 AM
Today was my pre-op checkup before my surgery Thursday. We had to be there early, and being the AWESOME morning person I ain't, we ran out the door without breakfast. We're sitting in the waiting room and across from us was a cafeteria, so I sent my hubby over for coffee. He brought back a HUGE blueberry muffin with crumbly brown sugary stuff on the top. And a knife to halve it with. I didn't eat it. I had a sausage/egg/cheese/english muffin sandwich that was probably every bit as fattening, but at least it had protein and not all sugary carbs. It was filling, it was delicious, and I didn't eat that damned sugar pill, yay me! Gave me some wicked gas, but that seemed par for the day I was having, lol.

That egg sandwich was the closest thing to healthy that cafeteria had - it was all pastries and sugared cereal in little boxes. And all three of the nurses I saw today were obese. :-(

I totally agree with what everyone is saying!

BUT THIS makes me the most crazy! The hospital where my children are seen (on the American military base) for medical and dental is over an hour away. Often we run out the door before 5am for appointments and I'm not always a great planner when I have to be awake and driving that early. It would be nice to arrive and have some healthy options for my kids available at the Cafe at the clinic... but NOPE it's all donuts and crap food. WTH?! This is a hospital... would it kill them to have some bananas or heck, even something reasonable like cereal? It blows my mind. Usually we end up waiting it out and hitting the grocery store on the way home. When my daughter had her surgery the cafeteria was awful too! I don't understand how a medical facility can serve such awful food. I just wanted a salad... but there was nothing available for me to eat that day. It is totally unbelievable to me.

DixieAmazon
11-09-2010, 07:52 AM
The USDA drives me crazy talking out of both sides of their mouth.
http://www.grist.org/article/food-2010-11-08-the-nyt-on-the-junk-food-industry-usda-alliance