100 lb. Club - Question for an obesity expert




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Teresa66
10-27-2010, 08:28 AM
I'm a member of TOPS and this Saturday two women from my group and myself are going to be interviewed for a documentary about obesity and the struggle we go through to lose our weight. Should be fun and interesting...I hope!

One of the things I have to do is come up with one question that I would ask if I was face to face with one of the leading obesity experts in the nation.

I can think of a few good questions but I thought I would ask you all for what your question might be so that I can pull a few really good ones.

Thanks! :)


Shmead
10-27-2010, 08:48 AM
Not a question, a suggestion:

There needs to be a board-certified medical specialty called "weight management" or some Latin version of the same. It's RIDICULOUS that if you have cancer, you go to an oncologist, if you have a heart attack you go see a cardiologist, if you are pregnant you see an Ob/gyn, if you have kidney problems you see a nephrologist, if you have ACNE you see a dermatologist, but if you are fat, you see your GP, who probably knows about as much about weight loss as your average issue of Family Circle. Other specialties touch on weight loss, but they all are only looking for one solution--endos look for hormone/insulin issues, surgeons think surgery, psychiatrists think mental health--but no one is trained or certified in the big picture.

I mean, if you had cancer and your GP sent you first to a chemotherapist, then to a radiologist, and then to a surgeon--none of whom ever talked to each other or knew anything about each others fields--you'd think it was an insane way to cure cancer. But that's how we treat obesity, which kills as many people as cancer, and makes many more miserable.

A board-certified weight management DOCTOR would know about nutrition (and way more than a dietitian, who has a bachelor's degree and takes maybe 8 classes specifically about nutrition) and be able to talk about a variety of eating plans. A certified weight management doctor would know about physical therapy/exercise and be able to build a reasonable, steadily increasing and safe exercise plan for an individual. A certified weight management doctor would know about the drugs and surgical options, and would be able to recommend for or against them as best suited an individual patient.

There are 26 board-certified medical specialties out there, and not one to deal with the greatest single health issue in this country.

Teresa66
10-27-2010, 09:13 AM
Well I certainly agree with you, Shmead! My GP is overweight and just tells me to eat less. He sent me to a dietitian who was no help except to try to convince me that her side job in selling MonaVie would surely get my weight off. Not for that price thank you! Next week I'm going to a physical therapist for a groin pull injury and I can't wait to see what they think I should do to heal this injury and get my weight off.

My question for the obesity expert might center around how much harder it is to lose weight the older I get. I honestly thought that if I cut my calories down to 1500 and started exercising the weight would just fall off. Yeah, no that isn't happening and it's been very frustrating.


Trazey34
10-27-2010, 09:27 AM
I'd like to ask an obesity expert if any studies have been done of people who've lost a significant amount of weight (let's say 100 lbs.), comparing the ones who did a psychological component along with the weight loss, vs ones who JUST went on a diet -- if they were any more/less/same successful at maintaining the loss?

I've seen my close friend lose 80 pounds about FIVE times but she will not, categorically refuses actually, to TALK about why she's fat....so she banishes ice cream and cookies religiously for a few months but never deals with anything and eventually the old behaviours come roaring back and we're back to square one. I've lost so much weight, worked so hard, done so much emotional and psychological work to get sane about food, that the notion of gaining it back is enough to wake me in a cold sweat!

popspry
10-27-2010, 10:30 AM
What is the best way a person can adjust from losing to maintaining since so many people lose then gain a significant portion back and the statistics seem to say few maintain long-term?

It is easy to say "Oh I could never go back to my old ways" but people do all the time

liway
10-27-2010, 10:53 AM
WOW!! Well said Shmead....!!! Maybe that should be the question.... Why DON'T we have a board-certified medical specialty called "weight management"? That would make total sense!!!

Teresa66
10-27-2010, 11:11 AM
Trazey, I like your question a lot because I really do feel it's about getting to the root of our psychological issues as to why we are overweight, and then learning how to work through our issues so that we can keep the weight off.


Popspry, your question is great as well and I would love to tie that in with Trazey's question. It sure stands to reason that maintaining is going to be much more doable if you get to the cause of why you got fat in the first place.

ubergirl
10-27-2010, 08:01 PM
Shmead. That is just an excellent question!!!! I work in health care, and currently work for a large prestigious medical center. When I first arrived, I looked up weight management on my new workplace's website-- guess what I got. Nothing except a link to the WLS-- housed in the department of surgery. That is inexcusable. Obesity is the number one major health threat in the United States right now, but the problem is just not being addressed in any kind of logical way. I believe that will change.... but there is a major obstacle and it has to do with insurance. Right now, WLS is a huge cash cow for hospitals. Whereas, right now, weight management services are either not reimburseable, or reimuburseable at very low primary care rates. That's a problem with the health care system, with the state of the science, and with our predilection to prefer quick fixes, like surgery, to low-tech primary care type approaches.

My question would be this: what insights have been gained from successful long-term losers, and how are those approaches being incorporated to help others?

Also, is there any truth to the idea that it may be harder for formerly obese people to maintain a normal weight than it is for normal weight people? In other words, are formerly obese people significantly different from never overweight people, and if so, how?

rockinrobin
10-27-2010, 09:08 PM
Shmead, you are spot on.

In the same vein, mine is not a question, but a suggestion.

Kids. School. Why oh why are we not educating our children on good and proper nutrition? Yes, I know it's the parents responsibility, but why not get the schools involved?

GirlyGirlSebas
10-28-2010, 12:07 PM
Kids. School. Why oh why are we not educating our children on good and proper nutrition? Yes, I know it's the parents responsibility, but why not get the schools involved? Robin, I absolutely love my daughter's school. She started 9th grade this year. Her first class is mandatory....Physical Fitness! She comes home sore some days, but she can now run a mile, do 25 pushups and 50 situps. She also knows how to do squats and lunges and interval training. One of her other classes is Health. The teacher eats organic foods and really knows her stuff. So, there is hope for our schools.

LiannaKole
10-28-2010, 12:31 PM
Sorry, OP, I can't think of a great question. But your thread has certainly got me thinking about it!

I agree with the others about GPs. Mine is a wonderful woman who is slightly overweight herself (nothing much). When I was younger she was concerned for my weight, and when I really hit obese a few years ago she was very concerned. But she sat me down and said I had to lose weight. That's it. Just "lose weight - eat right and exercise." Done. Not helpful. I agree that I don't think they know much about weight loss at all. Or not as much as they should.

Since then I've been educating myself. I've read books, articles, and any other info I could find. I've put together a bunch of what I've learned and adapt it to work for me. I take it all with a grain of salt and make sure it works for my body.

I do think that most times obesity is a choice (choose to not prevent/fix it, choose to prevent/fix it). Not for everyone, but for me it has been so far. I eat less, exercise more, and the weight comes off. And thank GOODNESS it's a choice, because no one else was helping me at all throughout my childhood. Apparently I was expected to always just know how to eat healthily. It's not inherent - I had to learn.

JayEll
10-28-2010, 01:08 PM
I would like to ask the obesity expert if he or she has ever been obese.

It's the difference between studying auto mechanics from a book and studying auto mechanics on your own car.

Jay

LindsayW
10-28-2010, 03:36 PM
Shmead, you are spot on.

In the same vein, mine is not a question, but a suggestion.

Kids. School. Why oh why are we not educating our children on good and proper nutrition? Yes, I know it's the parents responsibility, but why not get the schools involved?
My daughter is in first grade, and her school offers a wide variety of fruit and vegetables that they can choose from. I know that in class they talk about healthy food, and how much of what food they should have. Of course, they make it simple for 6-7 year olds, but still, the school IS teaching them about proper nutrition.

SCraver
10-28-2010, 03:52 PM
Shmead, I totally agree with you! Ubergirl's reasoning for why it doesn't exist makes sense. I think another reason may be that obesity is looked at as the fault of the obese person. He or she ate too much, didn't exercise and gained weight. Therefore, he or she just needs to eat less, exercise more. While someone with an illness like cancer didn't "choose" it.

Now - please understand - I do NOT agree with that thinking. I don't think any of us CHOSE to be fat. But I think our society looks upon weight as something we can and should control.

SCraver
10-28-2010, 03:54 PM
Rhonda and Lindsay - I am so glad to here there is hope for our schools! I worry so much over what it will be like for my toddler as he gets older. He LOVES fruit and does pretty well with veggies, too. I am hoping to encourage this forever!

rockinrobin
10-28-2010, 04:04 PM
Now - please understand - I do NOT agree with that thinking. I don't think any of us CHOSE to be fat. But I think our society looks upon weight as something we can and should control.

But our weight IS something we can control, isn't it? Well yes, it is. We DO choose to be fat. No one forces that food into our mouths. It's our decision.

Of course there are some who require certain medications and the such that prevents weight loss or packs on pounds, but other than that, we do get to decide if we are fat or not.

I'm not saying society should look down upon us for it, but it IS something we can control. And I'm not saying because it is our choice, that we don't need special help with it.

And it's great to hear that there are some schools who are teaching about good nutrition. I wish is were more widespread though

SCraver
10-28-2010, 04:19 PM
But our weight IS something we can control, isn't it? Well yes, it is. We DO choose to be fat. No one forces that food into our mouths. It's our decision.

Of course there are some who require certain medications and the such that prevents weight loss or packs on pounds, but other than that, we do get to decide if we are fat or not.

I'm not saying society should look down upon us for it, but it IS something we can control. And I'm not saying because it is our choice, that we don't need special help with it.

Yes and no. We DO chose to put the food in our mouths. But I don't think it is always so simple. I think that it is looked at as solely a choice. That we pick up our forks and eat crap and chose to be fat. But there are so many other factors that come into it other than that choice. yes - medications, metabolic disorders - but I am thinking things like: not knowing how to eat healthy, not understanding how to read labels, not understanding what role exercise plays, people who use food as a coping mechanism, etc.

I think a lot is in our control. I think that once you dig the hole and become obese, it is a HARD hole to dig yourself out of and STAY out of. And I think that people who haven't been through it don't realize that it isn't so simple as to wake up one day and say "gee! I think I will eat less and exercise more!" Society looks down on people. Obesity is taught to be somethign ashamed of. I don't think that is helpful at all. I think we all just need some help = whether it is knowledge or therapy or a support network or whatever.

Am I making any sense? Lol! I guess I feel it is a lot like the drug addict choosing to be addicted... yeah, s/he chose to do drugs, but there is more that comes into play other than simply chosing to stop. Though - I guess for some people it is.

JoJoJo2
10-28-2010, 05:02 PM
This is a complicated topic. Could it be that we are looking for excuses? Or reasons?

I always figured it was my fault I got fat. I did eat too much. I maybe am older than everyone else here at 3fc, but even in my era I learned about the food groups, and what I should be eating. If I chose to eat more than I should, I knew that I would get fat, and I did.

I can't blame my parents, they taught me well. I can't blame the schools I attended, they taught me well. I have always been able to understand the food groups, and what a calorie is, and the importance of exercise, and all that good stuff.

I just enjoyed eating, and I ate too much food. So I got fat. When I got around to it I cleaned up my act and got my weight under control.

I guess it is complicated for some people, but for me it was rather simple - I got fat because I ate too much, and I have no one to blame but myself.

rockinrobin
10-28-2010, 05:18 PM
Yes and no. We DO chose to put the food in our mouths. But I don't think it is always so simple. I think that it is looked at as solely a choice. That we pick up our forks and eat crap and chose to be fat. But there are so many other factors that come into it other than that choice. yes - medications, metabolic disorders - but I am thinking things like: not knowing how to eat healthy, not understanding how to read labels, not understanding what role exercise plays, people who use food as a coping mechanism, etc.

I think a lot is in our control. I think that once you dig the hole and become obese, it is a HARD hole to dig yourself out of and STAY out of. And I think that people who haven't been through it don't realize that it isn't so simple as to wake up one day and say "gee! I think I will eat less and exercise more!" Society looks down on people. Obesity is taught to be somethign ashamed of. I don't think that is helpful at all. I think we all just need some help = whether it is knowledge or therapy or a support network or whatever.

Am I making any sense? Lol! I guess I feel it is a lot like the drug addict choosing to be addicted... yeah, s/he chose to do drugs, but there is more that comes into play other than simply chosing to stop. Though - I guess for some people it is.

I really don't want to get into this too much here, as it is veering off the original topic.

People turn to food food for different reasons, but it is still their choice to turn to it.

I think that denying that it is our choice is a dangerous thing. You're taking away the power and that's debilitating. If you say that we can't control it, that means it's out of our hands and that there's nothing we can do about it. And that's false. And nothing could be further from the truth. I really did beleive that I had no choice for all those years and that's why I barely even attempted to lose the weight. Once I woke up and realized that it was my choice and I was the one choosing it, well that's very empowering. And that's when I was able to make the change.

So I think a major first step is to acknowledge that being fat is a choice and therefore losing weight is a choice. We don't have to be fat if we don't want to be. It is within our power. We are all capable of it. That's exciting if you ask me; to know that it is possible. That is something I always look to get across to others.

Teresa66
10-28-2010, 07:32 PM
Thanks so much to everyone participating in this topic, I really don't feel that it has gotten off track. Anything that makes us stop, question, and think is a good thing. ;)

I am firmly in the camp that says I'm fat because of my poor choices. Yes, there are causes that led me to have issues with food, which led to obesity. Just like there were causes that led me to be addicted to drugs for years and years (Five years clean from all that nonsense!)

The simple fact is that I let food control me and it is an ongoing battle to take that control from food and put it where it belongs. With me! In TOPS we open our meetings with a simple pledge that starts out by saying, "I am an intelligent person, I will control my emotions and not let my emotions control me."

I don't need to ask an obesity expert what foods to eat, or how many calories to consume, or if exercise is a good idea. I know what to do. I just need to get out of my hole and do it! And I am...one step and one day at a time.

I think on Saturday I will go with a list of questions to ask this "expert" and the first question (thanks to SCraver) will be how do I get my big butt out of this hole that I've dug and start living my life?

Shmead
10-28-2010, 07:50 PM
So I think a major first step is to acknowledge that being fat is a choice and therefore losing weight is a choice. We don't have to be fat if we don't want to be. It is within our power. We are all capable of it. That's exciting if you ask me; to know that it is possible. That is something I always look to get across to others.

I understand what you are saying, and largely agree, but it's important to remember that just because it's under their control doesn't mean fat people don't deserve help or advice.

I stayed fat because I was ignorant:

I didn't know I could lose weight on 1800 or even 2000 calories. I thought anything over 1200 was hopelessly weak and indulgent. I did SO MANY 1200 calories crash-and-burns over the years.

I didn't know there was any point in very moderate exercise. I thought if you weren't staying in your target heart range for 20 full minutes, the whole thing was pointless.

I didn't know that a lower-carb diet would keep me full longer and lead to less hunger overall.

I didn't know that if I got my PCOS under control, the raging, raging hunger would largely go away--being skinny didn't mean living with that hunger for life.

I made a lot of poor choices, but some of them--some very significant ones--were out of ignorance, not out of weakness. And I'm pretty damn smart and well educated. People say "It's their choice" but what they mean is "So they must be lazy good for nothings who shouldn't be taken seriously."

I'm a teacher. Let's say I have two students--one is a from a culture that doesn't encourage girls to go pursue any sort of education or career, and gets no support, let alone encouragement, when she wants to go to college. The other is from an upper-middle class family, parents and all 4 grandparents went to college, who has listened to talk about "when you are in college" since the first day of kindergarten. Now, both those kids have control over their futures, both those kids will make the choice to end up where they end up, but it'd be foolish to say those choices are equally simple for them. Now, when I am talking to the girl who doesn't get encouragement at home, I am going to tell her it's up to her, it's her choice, she has control--but in the back of my mind, I'm going to admit that she's got larger challenges to overcome than the other kid. Doesn't mean she can't over come them, but it'd be silly to deny they exist, and I am sure as **** not going to decide she must be weak or sad or lazy if she doesn't make it as far as the other kid does.

In the same way, different people face different challenges when it comes to weight management. It's important, for me, to realize it's under my control, but I am not going to judge someone else if they haven't been able to exercise that same control. Their challenges may well be greater than mine.

rockinrobin
10-28-2010, 08:16 PM
I understand what you are saying, and largely agree, but it's important to remember that just because it's under their control doesn't mean fat people don't deserve help or advice.

.

Oh my goodness. Of course overweight people deserve help, advice, support, guidance. 1000% so, which is what I tried to state (obviously not very well :() in my original post on this subject:

I'm not saying society should look down upon us for it, but it IS something we can control. And I'm not saying because it is our choice, that we don't need special help with it.

I feel terrible that you thought I was trying to say that. Terrible. No, nothing could be further from the truth. Which is why I probably spend so much time on this website, hoping that someone will pick up something of use that comes out of my meanderings...

Shmead
10-28-2010, 09:26 PM
I understood what you meant, and agreed. I was just pointing out why people are so quick to disavow control--there are so many jerks out there that do make the leap from "you have control" to "therefore fatties deserve nothing but scorn".

I used to really share this attitude toward myself--my self-scorn was so great that I didn't research weight loss the way I research everything else in my life because I equated research with "making excuses", and "justifying being a lazy fat***". I never felt that way about other people, but towards myself I bought into the idea that losing weight was easy and simple (just eat less, duh) and never approached it in a rational manner. If I wasn't finding it easy, it was because I was weak and pathetic and I needed to toughen up.

ETA: In case it isn't clear, I was just using your remarks a springboard to talk about a wider problem in weight loss. I think we more or less agree on the issue.

Oboegal
10-28-2010, 11:26 PM
I stayed fat because I was ignorant:

I didn't know I could lose weight on 1800 or even 2000 calories. I thought anything over 1200 was hopelessly weak and indulgent. I did SO MANY 1200 calories crash-and-burns over the years.

I didn't know there was any point in very moderate exercise. I thought if you weren't staying in your target heart range for 20 full minutes, the whole thing was pointless.

I didn't know that a lower-carb diet would keep me full longer and lead to less hunger overall.

I didn't know that if I got my PCOS under control, the raging, raging hunger would largely go away--being skinny didn't mean living with that hunger for life.

I made a lot of poor choices, but some of them--some very significant ones--were out of ignorance, not out of weakness. And I'm pretty damn smart and well educated. People say "It's their choice" but what they mean is "So they must be lazy good for nothings who shouldn't be taken seriously."

I just had to quote this whole passage. I think I'm just as glad there isn't a medical specialty dealing with obesity yet (I expect it will be called "bariatrics" once there is one) because there's so much ignorance and well-meaning bad advice around. I trust my own experience over anything a so-called medical professional would tell me about weight loss at this point.

I wonder how many thousands or millions of women have gotten more and more obese because they were trying to be "good" and eat low-fat diets that might as well have been poison if they were insulin resistant. They would get hungry and discouraged and finally be unable to handle the constant hunger. Which is what happened to me, over and over again.

It's so easy to blame people for eating too much and not exercising enough, but it just isn't nearly so simple.

rockinrobin
10-29-2010, 05:09 AM
I just had to quote this whole passage. I think I'm just as glad there isn't a medical specialty dealing with obesity yet (I expect it will be called "bariatrics" once there is one) because there's so much ignorance and well-meaning bad advice around. I trust my own experience over anything a so-called medical professional would tell me about weight loss at this point.

I wonder how many thousands or millions of women have gotten more and more obese because they were trying to be "good" and eat low-fat diets that might as well have been poison if they were insulin resistant. They would get hungry and discouraged and finally be unable to handle the constant hunger. Which is what happened to me, over and over again.

It's so easy to blame people for eating too much and not exercising enough, but it just isn't nearly so simple.


We speak of medical doctors and all, obesity experts, but the truth is, I don't know if even they could help some of us. Because it isn't all that simple. There is no one fix-it solution for everyone. There is no one across the board, this is the right way to do it. It's not just eat this and don't eat that. It's isn't just get your butt off the couch. If only it were that simple. If only it were. :(

I came up with what I think is a brilliant, brilliant plan for MYSELF. My big key non-negotiable factors:

- I could never, ever be hungry. Never. My solution - eat frequently and make every bite going down my throat a filling, satiating one. Therefore I had to eat ZERO empty calorie foods. I MUST feel as if I'm eaten.
-The food that I'm eating can't keep me clamoring for more of it. It can't bring on this "can't shove it in my mouth fast enough" feeling that I get with soooo many foods such as crackers, cereal, cookies, ice cream, rice, breads, etc. My solution - avoid them at all costs. I had a hard time (impossible) stopping to eat certain foods once I started. My solution -don't start.
-Volume. I like a LOT of food to eat. My solution - eat large quantities of lower calorie foods. (Also helps with the hunger). So I eat piles and piles of veggies. Much more than the average person and much more most likely than the average *dieter*.
-I have no intuitive eating button. It's missing. I need something to tell me to stop eating, something to keep me in check, something to tell me THIS is your proper portion. My solution - calorie counting. It's built in accountability and FORCED portion control.
-I MUST derive pleasure from the foods that I'm eating. I need to enjoy the heck out of it. My solution - eat tasty, tasty, mouth watering foods. Hence the reason I spend sooo much time in the kitchen preparing fabulous meals and snacks.

On top of all these non-negotiables, I needed rules. I had to set boundaries, limits. I had to learn skills and strategies. I relied on mantras and self-talk. Still do. I made daily weighing and recording a ritual. I planned out each and every bite that was to go in my mouth in advance. I set mini-goals for myself. I gave myself a *prize* after each 10 lbs lost. I needed to think outside of the box. I had to be super creative. I found 3fc. I decided to look for the joy in this and not the dread. These are all things I needed to search for/'seek out/discover for MYSELF.

No doctor in the world will tell you these things. But I will. I'm an obesity *expert,* (and there are many more *experts* right here at 3FC.) a super morbid obesity *expert* at that, or a losing weight *expert* and keeping it off *expert* - for me. Like Meg says, we are all laboratories of one.

I'm not sure if there's a doctor in the world who could have helped me.

And then there's another thing. If you would have told me, heck if I would have told me, to do all these things earlier, quite frankly, I'm not positive I would have listened to me.

It wasn't until I made the absolute decision to lose the weight "NO MATTER WHAT", that I really delved and methodically sat down and figured out what I needed to MAKE it happen. Because at that point I was WILLING to do whatever was necessary to ENSURE that it would happen. I was willing to make the changes. And I wasn't going to stop until it was done. No. Matter. What. Not sure if I was willing early. I'm just not sure.

You need WILLINGNESS. You need the willingness to make the change and stick it out and work past the uncomfortable moments of getting rid of bad habits and establishing new ones.

You also must come to the realization that *it* is worthy of all the time, effort and *work* that needs to be put into it. You need to make it a number one priority.

A doctor, nor an obesity expert can't give you these things. He can't write a prescription for it. You can't bottle it and sell it. You must get it from within.

Speaking of doctors, I remember (quite clearly) taking my daughter to the pediatrician several years ago. She had this strange cough and a low grade fever. He said it was just a virus. But the weird cough persisted and so did the low grade fever. I took her back to the doctor again. It's just a virus, wait it out, I was told again. I know my child better than any doctor. SOMETHING was not right here. This was no virus. I persisted and insisted on a chest x-ray. Turns out she had pneumonia. My point is, you can't even rely on the medical profession. You've got to rely on yourself. You've got to take matters into your own hands some times. You hear of situations of missed diagnoses all the time. All the time. You have got to fight for yourself. You've got to be on top of it. You, you and you.

I mean know disrespect to anyone, anywhere. But if you're ignorant (as I was) on what foods to eat and what foods not to eat - RESEARCH the heck out of it. Make it your business to find what works for yourself and what doesn't. Be persistent. Don't stop till you discover it. Don't take no for an answer. Require more from yourself. Raise your standards. Don't take it another second. Experiment. Try this, try that. Be willing to go the extra mile. No BS. No excuses. Be brutally honest. Don't tolerate it from yourself. Make it your job, your mission. Don't leave it to others. It's too important. You've got to rely on number one here - yourself. No. one. else.

You want out of the hole, dig yourself out. I distinctly remember thinking this, it is SO clear to me, from all those years ago. "I got myself into this mess, I will have to be the one to get myself out of the mess".

A common, old expression comes to mind - "If you want something done right, do it yourself."

Shmead
10-29-2010, 06:28 AM
I just had to quote this whole passage. I think I'm just as glad there isn't a medical specialty dealing with obesity yet (I expect it will be called "bariatrics" once there is one) because there's so much ignorance and well-meaning bad advice around. I trust my own experience over anything a so-called medical professional would tell me about weight loss at this point.

That's the point, though, isn't it? The advice you get now from doctors is total crap because they haven't actually, you know, studied weight loss. Specialists, who spend a couple years in an intensive residency program where they read all the literature out there and worked with other specialists, would develop much better advice than what we get today. Your GP would give you lousy advice about fighting cancer, too, but that doesn't mean an oncologist would give you the same advice.

Shmead
10-29-2010, 06:45 AM
We speak of medical doctors and all, obesity experts, but the truth is, I don't know if even they could help some of us. Because it isn't all that simple. There is no one fix-it solution for everyone. There is no one across the board, this is the right way to do it. It's not just eat this and don't eat that. It's isn't just get your butt off the couch. If only it were that simple. If only it were. :(

There's no one fix-it solution for cancer, either, or schizophrenia, or infertility, or cirrhosis, or AIDS. And, of course, none of these conditions can be successfully treated if the patient isn't willing to put in hard work and contribute to their own care. But a really, really smart doctor can sure help.

And then there's another thing. If you would have told me, heck if I would have told me, to do all these things earlier, quite frankly, I'm not positive I would have listened to me.

It wasn't until I made the absolute decision to lose the weight "NO MATTER WHAT", that I really delved and methodically sat down and figured out what I needed to MAKE it happen. Because at that point I was WILLING to do whatever was necessary to ENSURE that it would happen. I was willing to make the changes. And I wasn't going to stop until it was done. No. Matter. What. Not sure if I was willing early. I'm just not sure.

You need WILLINGNESS. You need the willingness to make the change and stick it out and work past the uncomfortable moments of getting rid of bad habits and establishing new ones.

You also must come to the realization that *it* is worthy of all the time, effort and *work* that needs to be put into it. You need to make it a number one priority.

A doctor, nor an obesity expert can't give you these things. He can't write a prescription for it. You can't bottle it and sell it. You must get it from within.

Of course the patient must be willing to do the work, must be willing to make the changes, but if, once you reach that point you can get good advice, that will sure smooth the way. It's like mental illness: no one successfully treats mental illness without huge amounts of private soul searching and hard work, but that doesn't mean a good psychologist and/or psychiatrist is useless.

Speaking of doctors, I remember (quite clearly) taking my daughter to the pediatrician several years ago. She had this strange cough and a low grade fever. He said it was just a virus. But the weird cough persisted and so did the low grade fever. I took her back to the doctor again. It's just a virus, wait it out, I was told again. I know my child better than any doctor. SOMETHING was not right here. This was no virus. I persisted and insisted on a chest x-ray. Turns out she had pneumonia. My point is, you can't even rely on the medical profession. You've got to rely on yourself. You've got to take matters into your own hands some times. You hear of situations of missed diagnoses all the time. All the time. You have got to fight for yourself. You've got to be on top of it. You, you and you.

I mean know disrespect to anyone, anywhere. But if you're ignorant (as I was) on what foods to eat and what foods not to eat - RESEARCH the heck out of it. Make it your business to find what works for yourself and what doesn't. Be persistent. Don't stop till you discover it. Don't take no for an answer. Require more from yourself. Raise your standards. Don't take it another second. Experiment. Try this, try that. Be willing to go the extra mile. No BS. No excuses. Be brutally honest. Don't tolerate it from yourself. Make it your job, your mission. Don't leave it to others. It's too important. You've got to rely on number one here - yourself. No. one. else.

You want out of the hole, dig yourself out. I distinctly remember thinking this, it is SO clear to me, from all those years ago. "I got myself into this mess, I will have to be the one to get myself out of the mess".

A common, old expression comes to mind - "If you want something done right, do it yourself."

Of course you can't just blindly trust your doctor. I'm in the middle of infertility treatments right now, and you can bet your a** I've researched every step of the process. I've certainly helped shape my treatment and never blindly trusted anything the doctor has told me. That said, having a specialist doctor has sure as **** been essential in the process.

I mean, I imagine a could replace the transmission in my car if I absolutely had to. I'd have to buy a lot of tools, make a lot of expensive mistakes, and it would probably take me a very long time to do it, but I'm reasonable intelligent and capable, so I'd probably be able to get it done eventually. But the process would go a **** of a lot smoother if I had someone who replaces transmissions every single day standing over my shoulder and giving me advice--or even just available for me to call and ask questions.

Rosinante
10-29-2010, 07:43 AM
My question would be about compulsory nutrition classes in schools, from kindergarten onwards.

imho obesity is largely (pun intended) personal consumption choices. That I chose to medicate my feelings and mental states by over-consuming, was also my choice. Not necessarily fault, definitely needing help and support, but still, my choice.

If I'd known from early childhood onwards the effect of bad nutritional choices, the positive benefit of good nutritional choices, I Might Not have chosen to consume what I did. I would no more dream of medicating my issues with over-use of alchohol, or recreational drugs than fly in the air, because I knew the problems associated with them.

And if it's a real expert, can they suggest how to make those kind of lessons compulsory without stigmatizing those who're already fat when they get there?

GirlyGirlSebas
10-29-2010, 07:51 AM
I'm an addict. Yes, I choose to overeat, but I don't want to. I can't begin to tell you the number of times that I've committed to the process and lasted only 2-3 weeks. I need some kind of help to work through the mental processes, but I can't find anyone in my area who has a clue. I would love for medical science to take this addiction seriously. Until then, I just keep trying and hoping to one day get it right.

rockinrobin
10-29-2010, 08:18 AM
I'm not saying to not seek outside help. Absolutely not. Find whatever it is YOU need to get the job done. Whether it's a nutritionist, WW meetings, a psychologist, a any one or anything.

I mean, I imagine a could replace the transmission in my car if I absolutely had to. I'd have to buy a lot of tools, make a lot of expensive mistakes, and it would probably take me a very long time to do it, but I'm reasonable intelligent and capable, so I'd probably be able to get it done eventually. But the process would go a **** of a lot smoother if I had someone who replaces transmissions every single day standing over my shoulder and giving me advice--or even just available for me to call and ask questions.

The difference is, is that your are the vehicle here. You are the transmission. And you are not a machine. You're a whole lot more complicated. You're a human being.

For right now, barring WLS, there is no medical intervention. There is no surgery to do on the brain that would take care of this. There is no pill. There is no magical solution. Yes, it would be nice if there was, but I'm not sure if there ever will be.

It would be great to call someone, but really, what could they tell you. "Get out of the kitchen, take a walk, eat a yogurt, take a hot bath, drink some tea, do some mediation, call your best friend". And I believe that is available if you desire it, to some extent at least.

I'm an addict. Yes, I choose to overeat, but I don't want to. I can't begin to tell you the number of times that I've committed to the process and lasted only 2-3 weeks. I need some kind of help to work through the mental processes, but I can't find anyone in my area who has a clue. I would love for medical science to take this addiction seriously.

I too am/was/am an addict. But again, if you're not finding the *right* person to help/guide you, I urge you to look within yourself, because sometimes (often?) that's the only person that can help you.

Until then, I just keep trying and hoping to one day get it right

Yes! Keep trying. Don't stop. And each time, push yourself a little bit more. Just a little bit harder and further than the time before. :hug:

SCraver
10-29-2010, 08:40 AM
Oboegal, rockinrobin and shmead - I hope you all took this as a friendly debate. Sometimes I wish there was a little more debate on this forum (you know - friendly like, where people don't take anything personal - of course, that doesn't really happen on the internet). It seems sometimes some one says something, some one disagrees and then everyone walks away. Which can be good - none of us wants to have arguements - but THIS thread has really got me thinking. I have gotten to see different points of view. I got to read a back and forth discussion. And it give me more to comtemplate as I continue my weight loss journey. (which, in case no one has noticed, has been a very emtional and mental journey for me so far) I hope it helps you guys, too, and that you don't see me as an instigator!

Lori Bell
10-29-2010, 09:07 AM
If I were the OP, I'd ask this expert when they are going to start treating obesity as an addiction.

I'm going out on a limb here, but I would venture to say that 95% of the OBESE population is addicted to SUGAR and sugar products. Most people are obese not because they have some deep rooted emotional problem, not because they were abused, or beat, or any awful thing, they are obese because the are chemically dependant on sugar. They CRAVE it. Like a skinny person who chain smokes CRAVES nicotine. If we expect some specialist to be able to help us we might as well keep dreaming for the miracle pill. You can't beat an addiction until you are ready to help yourself. It's the nature of the beast. I personally think too many people are still trying to blame science/the medical community/doctors...when they should be blaming C & H.

And as far as society looking down on us. WELLLL, in my area, the smokers the drinkers the junkies and the sluts get just as much ridicule.

rockinrobin
10-29-2010, 09:49 AM
I don't think any of us CHOSE to be fat. But I think our society looks upon weight as something we can and should control.


Scaver, I absolutely, positively do not look at you as in instigator. You are most definitely entitled to your opinion, as I am mine, as is every one else here.

Though nothing that's been said here can change my mind and nothing will ever change my mind. I still firmly believe that we choose to be fat and that we do have control over it. In my mind, there is no debate. I'll go a step further and disagree with you so strongly that we can't control our weight - I'll say it's a fact that we can. That is of course just my opinion ;).

Like I said, this was a key for ME - the exact opposite of what you said - Realizing that I was choosing to be fat and therefore I could choose to NOT be fat - so in actuality I did have control over it. That was indeed my very first step to taking charge and managing my addiction.

I hope that someone that has read this can see that and find the same empowerment that I got when I discovered this.

Heck, I'll go a step further. Maybe, deep, deep, deep down I always knew it, but used it as an excuse to not change my behaviors. I'm not certain.

Discussion is good. The more we delve, the more we discover, the more we grow. :)

tea2
10-29-2010, 11:10 AM
I think I agree with Lori Bell. About what to ask the expert, and in general. That's why going off or lowering sugar drastically will often work for people. I'd add that sometimes it can be a fat/salt or fat/sugar combination.

If it's me vs. brownie, I will ALWAYS lose. Always. So I keep out of their way unless it's under strictly controlled circumstances. There were brownies at work the other day. I had one. It was fine. I didn't want to be seen getting another one. So I didn't. If they'd been on a plate at home, whole 'nother story.

I know about nutrition; it's not lack of knowledge. I can tell you fat grams and calories on just about everything that comes into my purview. I eat healthy most of the time. It's the sweets (and occasionally fat/salt/carbs) that get me. But sweets much much more often. You have to put yourself in situations where you have control or arrange to have it. For me, it just can't be in front of me at home

Oboegal
10-29-2010, 12:51 PM
SCraver, I think this has been an excellent thread and I think the discussion has been respectful and thought-provoking.

I think it would be great if there were a medical subspecialty in which doctors *really* knew about the ins and outs of weight loss (and maintenance) in the way that some of us do. But I'm cynical enough to worry about the possibility of doctors getting certified as "experts" based on the conventional low-fat wisdom, which I consider to be pretty barbaric.

I think rockinrobin is definitely right that successful weight management is a very individual thing. I feel extremely blessed that I found a formula that works for me, but I also take credit for the initiative and perseverance it's taken to make it work. But I also had to have enough orneriness to decide that some of the traditional weight-loss advice simply doesn't apply to me.

rockinrobin
10-29-2010, 01:36 PM
I think rockinrobin is definitely right that successful weight management is a very individual thing. I feel extremely blessed that I found a formula that works for me.

Okay, and I'm reading this and I'm shaking my head back and forth - no, no, no - you didn't merely stumble upon a formula that works for you...

And then I read the next lines... and I stopped shaking my head no and started smiling and nodding my head up and down in agreement..

, but I also take credit for the initiative and perseverance it's taken to make it work. But I also had to have enough orneriness to decide that some of the traditional weight-loss advice simply doesn't apply to me

Cause' that's exactly it... At some point you will have to MAKE something work... and from what I've seen from any one who's lost a substantial amount of weight and kept it off, it's a compilation of many programs and ideas... and LOTS of thinking outside of the box.

Brutal honesty... Extreme desire... Effort... Creativity... Dedication... Determination... Perseverance.. Persistence... Willingness... Willingness and more Willingness....

SCraver
10-29-2010, 03:44 PM
I think it would be great if there were a medical subspecialty in which doctors *really* knew about the ins and outs of weight loss (and maintenance) in the way that some of us do. But I'm cynical enough to worry about the possibility of doctors getting certified as "experts" based on the conventional low-fat wisdom, which I consider to be pretty barbaric.


Ooo! Can I tell my Dr story? So, years ago, I go to the gyno. I had a bacterial infection - which might sound like TMI, but I wanted to point out that I was there because I had a problem and didn't feel well. So the over weight gyno who I had never seen before starts to tell me I need to lose weight. She then goes on to lecture me about how I should eat half a sandwich for lunch and half for snack later on. Looking back, this makes me laugh. I never eat sandwiches anymore! Bread is too many carbs and calories with limited fiber. She didn't ask me what I ate or if I was trying to lose weight or anything. It was just... unhelpful. Half a sammich for lunch? I would be so hungry.

Now I have a new gyno who I love. She says to me at my last visit: "let's talk about what would be a healthy weight for your height" (or something along those lines) That is when I told her about my running, strength training, eating veggies and seeing a therapist. She got really excited and asked for my therapists info because she thought that was excellent. And we talked about a 5k that was coming up... She runs and eats healthy and is clearly at a healthy weight.

BUT I am the one who woke up one day and realized I needed a therapist to help me through the tough time I was having at the beginning of this year (I have since stopped going). I am the one who figures out where to work in my exercise. I am the one who plans meals and dinner for my family. So I guess rockinrobin is right. It is all in my control. I did this, I can undo it. I guess I just don't want people to judge me for being fat. I HONESTLY did NOT know I would get AS FAT as I did. Or in as BAD of shape as I was. And when I realized I needed to DO SOMETHING - I didn't know what to do. I thought I would have to work out like a crazy woman and be hungry all the time. My first big diet change was switching from white to wheat bread (didn't even know there was WHOLE wheat bread out there - I was just eating "wheat" bread)

Oh god... I am rambling.

Can't. Stop. Myself.

Now, I have realized that there is no magical solution out there. No magical pill. Not even a magical food plan. I can't pick some cleansing diet out of Woman's Day and think it is the answer for me. (hahaha!) I have had to work hard at educating myself about foods and exercise. Quinoa? Barley? What are those? You mean there are other ways to cook veggies other than just in the microwave with butter and salt? You mean I don't have to exercise for 3 hours a day... or even 1?? MSG does WHAT to the body?!? I should poop HOW MANY TIMES a day!? You mean if I don't like a food, I might be able to cook it differently and find I DO like it?

Shmead
10-29-2010, 05:46 PM
I'm not saying to not seek outside help. Absolutely not. Find whatever it is YOU need to get the job done. Whether it's a nutritionist, WW meetings, a psychologist, a any one or anything.

My point is that none of those options are much good. A nutritionist has a B.A. at most, and in many states, no certification at all.


The difference is, is that your are the vehicle here. You are the transmission. And you are not a machine. You're a whole lot more complicated. You're a human being.

For right now, barring WLS, there is no medical intervention. There is no surgery to do on the brain that would take care of this. There is no pill. There is no magical solution. Yes, it would be nice if there was, but I'm not sure if there ever will be.

It would be great to call someone, but really, what could they tell you. "Get out of the kitchen, take a walk, eat a yogurt, take a hot bath, drink some tea, do some mediation, call your best friend". And I believe that is available if you desire it, to some extent at least.

Right, so if a machine needs a specialist, so much more a human being. A doctor--a skilled, knowledgeable professional---could have told me to try 1) starting at 2000 instead of 1200 calories and that I would still lose weight that way 2) lowering my carb, and especially my simple carb intake 3) exercise gradually because even intermittent, low-impact exercise can burn measurable calories. 4) Explain to me exactly how my PCOS interacts with weight.

I don't expect a weight loss doctor to give everyone a one-size fits all solution any more than an oncologist treats every case of lung cancer the same, or a lawyer writes every will the same, or a teacher teaches every child the same. I want someone--a knowledgeable professional--who could have helped me find the method that works best for me by making suggestions and guiding me through different approaches. Right now, we have to plow through all the BS on the internet to figure out what really can work and then find out what works for us. It's like the wild west out there and it takes a lot of sophistication to know what to trust.

Shmead
10-29-2010, 05:49 PM
I think it would be great if there were a medical subspecialty in which doctors *really* knew about the ins and outs of weight loss (and maintenance) in the way that some of us do. But I'm cynical enough to worry about the possibility of doctors getting certified as "experts" based on the conventional low-fat wisdom, which I consider to be pretty barbaric.



This is why it needs to be board certified, with a 2-3 year residency where you read all the available literature and end with a very difficult series of exams over what's known. Also, once something is board certified there comes to exist a community of doctors who talk to each other and learn from each other. Ten years of this would really improve our knowledge of weight loss technique.

I think this would also solve the insurance problem, because if there were a board-certified specialty, the doctors would bill as specialists. Right now they bill at GPs because that's what they are.

DixC Chix
10-29-2010, 09:23 PM
Obesity is such a complicated issue. You all have given me so many things to think about.

I wonder why the medical community itself hasn't pushed for a board certified specialty especially if the potential for more money (insurance) is there??

Imagine what they could do...



BTW, I saw a documentary on a woman who did have brain surgery to control the area of her brain for satiety and appetite. She had a sort of 'pacemaker' implanted.

ubergirl
10-29-2010, 11:19 PM
Regarding the medical issue-- what really bothers me is that within the medical community, weight loss is treated almost like an impossible dream.

I was just looking at an in service distributed to the entire hospital community about how to treat obese patients, and one of the statements in this document, was that "it is almost impossible for a morbidly obese person to lose weight through diet and exercise." This is a document that is distributed to doctors and nurses in a hospital.

I have to say that we are the winners-- the special people who have figured out how to draw upon mental and emotional resources, and swapped into, and cobbled together stuff that works.

But it is also true that there is MUCH more genuine knowledge about weight loss kicking around 3FC than there is at the average doctor's office.

And A LOT of that has to do with the fact that there is a pervasive belief within the medical community that diet and exercise don't work, and there is also NO MONEY in treating obesity, except in the surgical treatment of obesity.

I predict that in the next ten years there will be more focus on obesity treatment and there will be some successes. I think obesity is an important health problem and deserves a coordinated treatment approach. Right now, nobody will pay for that.

Justwant2Bhealthy
10-30-2010, 01:42 AM
OP: I have a question for you ~ "When is there going to be a concerted effort by the medical establishment to find more ways to help people get their weight under control through diet & exercise?"


UBERGIRL ~ our local doctors have the same attitude here; they believe and say exactly what your document says, so their only advice to people now is to get WLS ... but my previous doctor was different -- he was a real health nut and truly believed that if I ate the right foods, in the right amounts, that I could get my weight under control again, and he encouraged me to do so. He also told me that he thought that I was probably already "an obesity expert" myself ... :lol:


ROBIN ~ I hear ya; and also love your advice, but I was wondering this one thing -- and this is not meant as an excuse or anything like that; but, I wonder if some of us go through some rough patches in life that lead us to erroneously believe that we don't have control over our eating, so we give up. Then when something prompts us (ill health, pain, etc) to take notice of what we are doing to ourselves -- then we wake up, and start to take some action towards regaining self-control. We definitely didn't want to be obese; we didn't want to overeat; we didn't want to get and be fat. So what we need is places like 3fc's; and supportive doctors & therapists who will help us realize that it CAN BE and IS under our control to change; and that we can be healthier once again.

ie I kept losing weight and gaining it back: when some turmoil or stress would come into my life, I inevitably turned to food for comfort and numbed out. In that sense, it was like a drug: an addiction. The weight came back on so fast that I almost didn't even notice it until my clothes didn't fit anymore. I felt totally frustrated that I did all that hard work, only to regain it and felt defeated & disillusioned.

Now I know what I did wrong -- so there was a lack of knowledge there on my part. I was ignorant of this one fact ... that I MUST make PERMANENT CHANGES to my eating and lifestyle choices for long-term weight-loss success. Thank goodness I now realize this.

Also, I do find it more difficult now that I am older simply becuz my health was worse from the excess weight; so I would say to you younger ones, to GET IT UNDER CONTROL NOW -- don't wait until you are in your 40's or 50's and have piles of weight-related health issues to deal with ... DO IT NOW!!!

Rosinante
10-30-2010, 02:50 AM
We've had the "virtually impossible for a morbidly obese person to lose weight by diet and exercise" line in the UK too, and this is in a system where the worry about 'are they trying to wring money out of me by pushing surgery' is not normally the case ~ health trusts are constantly having to deal with 'one person's WLS means no cancer drugs for another' scenario.

I think the "virtually impossible" statement is shorthand for "to lose weight PERMANENTLY". Very many of us here are wonderful at losing weight, we should be, we've done it so often! :S A lot of us are very bad at keeping it off.
All of which means that as well as correct nutritional information from kindergarten onwards - which I think is the primary key - we also need a huge investment in looking at the reasons why people choose not to change their obesity.

rockinrobin
10-30-2010, 07:42 AM
Right, so if a machine needs a specialist, so much more a human being. A doctor--a skilled, knowledgeable professional---could have told me to try 1) starting at 2000 instead of 1200 calories and that I would still lose weight that way 2) lowering my carb, and especially my simple carb intake 3) exercise gradually because even intermittent, low-impact exercise can burn measurable calories. 4) Explain to me exactly how my PCOS interacts with weight.

I don't expect a weight loss doctor to give everyone a one-size fits all solution any more than an oncologist treats every case of lung cancer the same, or a lawyer writes every will the same, or a teacher teaches every child the same. I want someone--a knowledgeable professional--who could have helped me find the method that works best for me by making suggestions and guiding me through different approaches. It's like the wild west out there and it takes a lot of sophistication to know what to trust.

My point is that none of those options are much good. A nutritionist has a B.A. at most, and in many states, no certification at all.


Shmead, of course I agree with you. I think we are basically in agreement, we're just stating it differently - semantics. The nutritionist, WW leaders, etc.. AREN'T good options. This is my point as well. This specialist doesn't exist. We are on our own. It's up to us.

If you ask me this *obesity* specialist should be someone who's been there, done that. A BA would be nice, but nothing can replace real life, first hand training. And STILL that may not be enough. The bottom line will ALWAYS be us. A professional may tell you to try this and this and this, but if that person isn't willing to try it and SEE IT THROUGH... it's useless information.

Look at all the great advice that is meted out here at 3FC. It varies greatly. With all the different methods and approaches that all the big losers here at 3FC have used to help themselves. Many of us at times give detailed posts as to what we did to help ourselves. And unfortunately people don't heed that advice.

Of course I think some people would benefit more (much more) if that advice came from a professional, where accountability would also be involved. Weighing weekly, closer monitoring, weekly pep talks, going over menus and how to improve those menus, talking about tips and strategies, meal planning, shopping tips, eating out strategies, how to deal with holidays, stress, social events, the whole bit, working on the head game - pointing out how worth it is, speaking about NSV'S, the future, the importance of it all, etc.

Right now, we have to plow through all the BS on the internet to figure out what really can work and then find out what works for us.

And Shmead, you said you would have liked a professional to have helped you sort through the approaches and had to resort to the internet - there you have it.. You were so determined that you didn't stop till you had YOUR answers. This professional doesn't exist, yet you FOUND your answers. Yes, I'm not arguing with you, but that professional doesn't exist and it didn't stop you.

Justwant2behealthy,
I wonder if some of us go through some rough patches in life that lead us to erroneously believe that we don't have control over our eating, so we give up.

YEs, 100%. So many of us (I was one of them) believe that we simply don't have the control. That we lack it. that we're not capable of it. That it's a flaw in ourselves. That's why I was so upset when it was stated that we don't have control over our weight. We have got to, got to, got to realize that we DO. Regardless of our circumstances and boy can those circumstances be rough sometimes, we STILL have control of what goes into our mouths and what doesn't.

I kept losing weight and gaining it back: when some turmoil or stress would come into my life, I inevitably turned to food for comfort and numbed out. In that sense, it was like a drug: an addiction. The weight came back on so fast that I almost didn't even notice it until my clothes didn't fit anymore. I felt totally frustrated that I did all that hard work, only to regain it and felt defeated & disillusioned.

Lots of people do this. We've got to learn OTHER methods of self comfort. Ones that are truly comforting. Because we must learn that over-eating is of NO comfort other than a few minutes. A temporary (non) fix. Because when that food is gone, where's the comfort? Certainly not in ill fitting clothing. We deserve long term comfort. Mediation, long walks, reading, journaling, whatever it is. You've got to be the one to find it.

We've got to learn to separate our food from everything else. We eat what we eat. It's got nothing to do with events, situations and what not. Especially for the addict such as myself.

And the weight DOES come back on fast. Daily weighing though would have helped you realize that faster than waiting for your clothing to not fit you. It's a wonderful maintenance tool. You can't deny the numbers on the scale then.
Now I know what I did wrong -- so there was a lack of knowledge there on my part. I was ignorant of this one fact ... that I MUST make PERMANENT CHANGES to my eating and lifestyle choices for long-term weight-loss success. Thank goodness I now realize this.

Well, yes, it IS about permanent changes. Hop on over to the maintainer's forum. Maintenance is almost identical to losing. You'll hear it over and over again.

PaulaM
10-30-2010, 12:10 PM
My biggest beef with the medical community is the way they blame EVERYTHING on being overweight. I dropped my internist like a hot potato after I went to him wheezing and he told me "don't you wheeze all the time anyway"? I found a new doctor who diagnosed bronchitis. Many of them don't even bother trying to find out what is wrong, oh you are fat, next patient. I have found the same type of treatment where they will tell a woman "it's stress" and for a man they dig deeper to find out what is wrong. My husband and I both had terrible gut pain for months, I was told stress, he was scheduled for more tests. I ended up with a blocked bile duct due to a gallstone. His just went away on its own. Double standards.

Sorry for the rant, but I feel better now LOL. The "experts" should talk to those who are real experts, the success stories on this forum.

ghostgirl811
10-30-2010, 07:08 PM
Ide ask if they think that people who get weight loss surgery are more likely to gain their weight back, or some of it, rather than those who didnt and lost their weight naturally and with out some type of weight loss pill?

Teresa66
10-30-2010, 08:03 PM
Well I did my interview for the documentary on obesity. After arriving at the studio, I found out that this is going to be a five part documentary on obesity. They are talking to lots of people from the medical community and from ordinary people like me who know what a struggle it is to lose the weight and keep it off.

My question that I did get to ask was about why we don't have a board-certified specialty on weight-loss. The man who interviewed me said that I asked a great question, so maybe they will use it in the show.

This documentary won't air for another year and a half, but I will let everyone know when and where they can see it. I sure hope it's done well.