100 lb. Club - Weight loss myth pet peeves




View Full Version : Weight loss myth pet peeves


matt_H
10-21-2010, 01:12 PM
**Disclaimer, this is not pointed at anyone in particular as it is my own pet peeve and people are free to disagree with me**

One of the things that I hear constantly is the "starvation mode" argument for eating more. I sometimes read posts on various web forums where people are genuinely worried that they are not eating enough and that is why they haven't lost weight. They even ask "should I force myself to eat when I'm not hungry?" etc.

Perhaps it is because this idea is ubiquitous that is bothers me so much. Also because this idea really often causes undo fear among people. What the concept of "starvation mode" means and how it is interpreted are vastly different things. People often genuinely believe that they aren't losing weight because they haven't ate enough, like consuming more calories will actually cause more weight loss. That is absolutely NOT the case. The less calories you take in, the more weight you will lose. ALWAYS.

All that the starvation mode means is that there is a point of diminishing returns. If you eat 2000 calories a day and you need 2500 calories a day for RMR, you will lose 1 pound a week. Since 3500 calories = 1 pound of fat, that will be how much you should have lost that week. However, if ate 1000 calories a day instead of 2000, you might not lose 2 pounds that week predicted by the calories deficit but only 1.8 pounds because your metabolism has slowed just a little bit because you didn't eat that many calories. However, you still lost weight because of the calorie deficit and you lost more weight than you would have if you ate 2000 calories.

There is a good reason to make sure you eat enough food. That is because when you are very hungry it might lead to a binge. However, there is no scientific basis for being in fear that your weight loss has stalled because you haven't eaten enough food.

***end rant**

Are there any weight loss pet peeves that you have?


goodforme
10-21-2010, 01:21 PM
Some of my pet peeves are things that I have actually replied to other posters, and have been debunked by my good friends here at 3FC.

Muscle does NOT weigh more than fat. A pound of muscle is just one pound, 16 ounces. It may take up less space on your body, but it's still one pound. And, it's RIDICULOUSLY hard to build pounds of muscle. When someone starts exercising, and their weight stays the same for a couple of weeks, it's probably just good old fashioned water weight.

Also, that carbs are your friends, and that eating your fill of "low fat" pastas and breads and rice will make you lose weight. Not if you live in my body, it won't. The whole idea that weight loss is "one size fits all" (please pardon my pun) just gets under my skin.

Wow, I feel better already!:p

ThicknPretty
10-21-2010, 01:32 PM
Starvation mode is one of my big pet peeves, too. It's sort of ridiculous.

Also, it annoys me that every time diet comes in conversation, someone must go on a tangent about how "bad" carbs are for you. It's so narrow minded and I feel kind of sorry for those people who can be so easily convinced that an entire food group is not only unecessary, but evil! (And no, I'm not talking about anyone who follows a low carb diet or those wise enough to recognize good AND bad carbs. I'm referring to the women who truly believe that a piece of wheat bread is worse than a half pound block of cheddar cheese.)


parkedout
10-21-2010, 01:47 PM
Mine is the Amazing Shrinking Stomach.


I WISH I could shrink my stomach!:D (Well, without surgery and recovery I mean!:))

SCraver
10-21-2010, 01:55 PM
Starvation mode is one of my big pet peeves, too. It's sort of ridiculous.

Ditto on this!

cherrypie
10-21-2010, 01:57 PM
mine is the idea that some diet will work and some diet won't. It isn't the diet that is the problem. It's the application.

I remember a woman I worked with used to ask if this or that "worked" and would tell me which diet didn't "work". Finally I just said ANYTHING would work if you did it long enough. Just not eating french fries ever again would probably make you lose a couple pounds if you did it long enough

luckymommy
10-21-2010, 01:57 PM
I hope it's ok for me to say this, but right now, my only pet peeve about weight loss is people who act like they know what's best for me! Ugh! Just because I'm overweight, that doesn't mean I don't know what to do. Ok, I feel better too. Thanks! ;)

saef
10-21-2010, 02:13 PM
[None of these are directed at any particular post: They are pulled from my own overactive imagination & my misanthropy from reading too many consecutive posts.]

If my weight loss plateaus for a week, I must be in "starvation mode."

If my weight loss plateaus for two weeks, I've "put on a lot of muscle" & that must be what the scale is showing, rather than fat.

Water weight. What the heck is it, really? How is actual fat weight different from water weight, and how do we KNOW which one it is? I think it's water weight when we want to make someone feel better. Or make ourselves feel better. At least, that's how I use this distinction.

If I eat less, I will shrink my stomach so I don't need to eat as much as I used to.

If I exercise at least 15 minutes a day, I'd better get my butt to GNC & buy a case & a half of protein powder to fuel myself.

I can exercise fat away from particular spots of my body just by doing one tiny little exercise over & over again -- without affecting the fat on any other part of my body. (Yep. I have the secret. Got it from Suzanne Somers: I can reduce my thighs without losing from my boobs, solely by exercise.)

Wheat and dairy are the root of all evil in the world. To everyone. At all times. Free the cows, plow under all the wheat fields.

No one in the Western world has had a healthy diet since: (fill in the blank): 1) my grandmother's lifetime; 2) 150 years ago; 3) 6,000 years ago; 4) we've never had a healthy diet, but the Asians have had a great diet; 5) only native people have ever had a healthy diet; 6) one single American doctor [fill in any name here] (re)discovered the One True Secret that should inform America's diet forevermore.

Losing weight through weight loss surgery is really simple. They just cut you open, rearrange your insides, and voila, you're set. For life. You can eat anything, do anything you want. It's just another Modern Medical Marvel of Magic.

caryesings
10-21-2010, 02:14 PM
The "all you have to do is exercise more". And this is coming from a person who knows exercise has been a big positive factor in my weight loss. But I hear this over and over again from men who want their wives or girlfriends to continue to eat (with them) like they always have, but "work out as much as Cary" to get my body. Well boys, 6 hours per week of exercise isn't going to do it if she still shares pizza and beer with you and all the other eating traditions couples can fall into.

Whew, that feels good to get that out.

caryesings
10-21-2010, 02:17 PM
The other one is not so much a myth as a misunderstanding. The common terminology of "carbs" when I think people mean specific simple carbohydrate foods. Over and over I see people mentioning their low-carb eating plan then listing all the vegetables they eat.

Meg
10-21-2010, 02:29 PM
You all have hit most of my favorites (especially starvation mode and muscle weighs more than fat, so the five pounds I gained this week with walking must be muscle), but let me add:

Eating an off-plan, high calorie, low nutrition meal will somehow "shock" your metabolism into weight loss.

"Organic" on the label means low calorie and healthy (i.e. organic, whole wheat chocolate chip cookies :fr:).

Drinking lots of water is critical for fat loss.

The "fat burning zone".

My biggest pet peeve:

Once we reach goal, maintenance will be natural and intuitive. We'll be able to eat whatever we want, "in moderation". All of our eating issues will be cured. Anyone who continues to count calories, weigh and measure portions, plan menus in advance, exercise daily, and avoid certain trigger foods clearly is "obsessed" and has some kind of eating disorder.

Eliana
10-21-2010, 02:51 PM
LOL! You've all hit on some of mine already.

Also, spot reduction...nope, ain't gonna happen. :no:

Women will bulk up with lifting...nope, ain't gonna happen. :no:

You can and should lose 1-2 pounds a week. I REALLY wish people (by whom I mean doctors and the media) would say "4-8 pounds in a month". I don't know about you men, but many women do not lose regularly...at all.

beerab
10-21-2010, 02:57 PM
I also hate when people say "oh you haven't lost weight you must be gaining muscle!" I'm like dude it's been 2 weeks, it's not muscle! lol.

I also hate when people tell me I don't eat enough carbs- I'm like um yes I do- I get them from veggies and some grains- if I go over a certain percentage in my day 2 things happen: 1- I feel sick and 2- I either gain- my body just isn't built to handle carbs and I've had to face that reality so stop bugging that I never bring a sandwich to lunch!

Eliana
10-21-2010, 02:59 PM
The "fat burning zone".


Oh, this one! And you're a PT right? I swear, I'm sorry, but when I was 235 pounds and my HR got up to 180 with a brisk walk, backing it down to a stroll to get my HR in the "fat burning zone" was going to get me NOWHERE fast!

SCraver
10-21-2010, 03:17 PM
Drinking lots of water is critical for fat loss.

OMG. HOW could I forget the water one. I HATE this. I just can NOT drink 64 oz of straight up water a day. I don't care what anyone says, I can't do it. Nor do I want to. Nor do I feel it is important FOR ME to do. Lol!

SCraver
10-21-2010, 03:18 PM
Oh, this one! And you're a PT right? I swear, I'm sorry, but when I was 235 pounds and my HR got up to 180 with a brisk walk, backing it down to a stroll to get my HR in the "fat burning zone" was going to get me NOWHERE fast!

Lol! when I was 250 and first joined the gym - my heart rate would shoot up OVER 200 very quickly. My resting heart rate was probably in the "fat burning zone". Lol! NINE years later, my heart rate still gets up pretty high when I push it... but if I don't push it, I don't improve!

Coondocks
10-21-2010, 03:21 PM
"Organic" on the label means low calorie and healthy (i.e. organic, whole wheat chocolate chip cookies :fr:).



That's the one, RIGHT there.

The only other pet peeve I have that irritates me to no end is the unsolicited 'advice' I receive from the most random of people telling me they know a much better, faster way to loose weight.

1 - I'm clearly doing fine on my own if I've lost 70 lbs

2 - I refuse to take advice on nutrition and health from some one I know eats nothing but junk and thinks exercise is walking to their car

3 - I didn't ask for your opinion . . . probably means I don't want it :p

parkedout
10-21-2010, 03:25 PM
LOL- But water is critical for my fat loss!

I replaced all my strawberry shakes with H20.:D:p


I wish I knew where the Fat Burning Zone was... I would totally go there!;)

saef
10-21-2010, 03:28 PM
I wish I knew where the Fat Burning Zone was... I would totally go there!

It's like the No Parking Zone or the No Standing Zone or the Unloading Zone.

You're only allowed there for a really, really short time.

Beverlyjoy
10-21-2010, 03:29 PM
You've mentioned many that I have. But, one that gets me is the folks that say if the plan they used worked for them, it MUST be able to work for you.

In weight loss - one size (plan) does not fit all. If that was true, there wouldn't be so many approaches. (weight watchers, calories, exchanges, low fat, South Beach, glycemic......)

eclipse
10-21-2010, 03:30 PM
Some of my pet peeves are things that I have actually replied to other posters, and have been debunked by my good friends here at 3FC.

Muscle does NOT weigh more than fat. A pound of muscle is just one pound, 16 ounces. It may take up less space on your body, but it's still one pound. And, it's RIDICULOUSLY hard to build pounds of muscle. When someone starts exercising, and their weight stays the same for a couple of weeks, it's probably just good old fashioned water weight.



Wow, I feel better already!:p

Honestly, though, arguing whether or not muscle is heavier than fat is just a semantic argument. Given a volume of fat that is equal to a volume of fat, the muscle will have more mass, or be heavier. No one who says muscle weighs more than fat actually thinks that a pound muscle actually weighs more than a lb of fat, just that an amount of fat that occupies the same amount of space as a an amount of muscle will be lighter. One of my pet peeves is the argument that muscle does not weigh more than fat :lol:.

However, I do agree with you on the "you're probably just building muscle" argument.

SCraver
10-21-2010, 03:34 PM
LOL- But water is critical for my fat loss!

I replaced all my strawberry shakes with H20.:D:p


LOL! Mmm... strawberry shake...

Meg
10-21-2010, 03:37 PM
The problem with "muscle weighs more than fat" is the context it's used in. When someone posts "yikes, my scale went up five pounds" and they get the response that "don't worry, it's only muscle and muscle weighs more than fat", it's not referring to the relative volume of fat versus muscle. The implicit statement is don't panic, gaining muscle somehow makes the scale go up more than gaining fat does. And of course, it's not true. Gaining a pound of muscle only makes the scale go up a pound, not two or five.

If someone posted that their jeans were getting looser because muscle weighs more than fat, then I'd agree that they're making an argument based on volume or mass, not pounds. But in the context that we almost always see it here at 3FC, it's about scale weight and not how much room their fat takes up. :)

parkedout
10-21-2010, 03:39 PM
It's like the No Parking Zone or the No Standing Zone or the Unloading Zone.

You're only allowed there for a really, really short time.

LOL-Thats about my luck!:D

SCraver
10-21-2010, 03:44 PM
The problem with "muscle weighs more than fat" is the context it's used in. When someone posts "yikes, my scale went up five pounds" and they get the response that "don't worry, it's only muscle and muscle weighs more than fat", it's not referring to the relative volume of fat versus muscle. The implicit statement is don't panic, gaining muscle somehow makes the scale go up more than gaining fat does. And of course, it's not true. Gaining a pound of muscle only makes the scale go up a pound, not two or five.

If someone posted that their jeans were getting looser because muscle weighs more than fat, then I'd agree that they're making an argument based on volume or mass, not pounds. But in the context that we almost always see it here at 3FC, it's about scale weight and not how much room their fat takes up. :)

Correct me if I am wrong - but doesn't it take a LOT of work to build a pound of muscle?

Meg
10-21-2010, 03:49 PM
You're absolutely right. :)

Most estimates I've read are that a woman who is training rigorously with heavy weights, and on an extremely regimented, high protein diet might be able to add about 4 - 6 pounds of muscle in six months.

Beginners to weight training have a 6 - 12 month Golden Period when they may be able to add more muscle, but it's safe to say that no one gains five pounds of muscle in a week. Or month. And no one gains muscle on a program of strictly cardio.

Those of us who are trying to lose fat have to fight very, very hard simply to maintain our existing muscle mass. Any muscle gain during fat loss is a bonus and is pretty rare.

midwife
10-21-2010, 03:54 PM
Wheat and dairy are the root of all evil in the world. To everyone. At all times. Free the cows, plow under all the wheat fields.
.

Free the cows! Free the cows!!! :moo::cp:

matt_H
10-21-2010, 03:58 PM
This post is cathartic, right? :)

SCraver
10-21-2010, 04:03 PM
You're absolutely right. :)

Most estimates I've read are that a woman who is training rigorously with heavy weights, and on an extremely regimented, high protein diet might be able to add about 4 - 6 pounds of muscle in six months.

Beginners to weight training have a 6 - 12 month Golden Period when they may be able to add more muscle, but it's safe to say that no one gains five pounds of muscle in a week. Or month. And no one gains muscle on a program of strictly cardio.

Those of us who are trying to lose fat have to fight very, very hard simply to maintain our existing muscle mass. Any muscle gain during fat loss is a bonus and is pretty rare.

WOW! I had no idea it was THAT little... so then, when I am lifting my weights and I get see my not so little arms getting more defined - I am not imagining it, right? I mean... there is a wee bit more muscle? I was working hard on my arms for my sisters wedding (since that was what would mostly be showing in my dress) and I did notice a big improvement - but those are small muscles anyways - relative to say, my meaty thighs.

saef
10-21-2010, 04:08 PM
This post is cathartic, right?

I thank you, Matt, for helping me attain catharsis this afternoon. It feels damn good.

LindseyLou
10-21-2010, 04:09 PM
I hope it's ok for me to say this, but right now, my only pet peeve about weight loss is people who act like they know what's best for me! Ugh! Just because I'm overweight, that doesn't mean I don't know what to do. Ok, I feel better too. Thanks! ;)

I second this!

I can't stand once people know you're on a diet, they act like they are like nutritionists or something! Or if you tell them what your diet is...."oh, well I'm not sure that will work." LOL But, the thing is you've been DOING the diet and it has worked...:?:

calluna
10-21-2010, 04:09 PM
Yeah, I'm loving this thread. :D

Meg
10-21-2010, 04:11 PM
WOW! I had no idea it was THAT little... so then, when I am lifting my weights and I get see my not so little arms getting more defined - I am not imagining it, right? I mean... there is a wee bit more muscle? I was working hard on my arms for my sisters wedding (since that was what would mostly be showing in my dress) and I did notice a big improvement - but those are small muscles anyways - relative to say, my meaty thighs.

Arms especially can show a huge improvement with adding a bit of muscle and losing fat at the same time. :carrot: No one can have muscle definition until we lose the layer of fat on top of the muscle, so stripping away fat while strengthening and building muscle will make awesome arms!

And a little bit of muscle will go a long way on arms. Think about a one pound steak -- it's mostly muscle and it takes up a lot of room. If you wrapped a one pound steak around your arm, you'd have some pretty impressive biceps, right? (visions of Lady GaGa's meat dress :lol:)

time2lose
10-21-2010, 04:14 PM
My favorite weight loss myth pet peeve is one that I tried to make true for many years - that I could lose weight without putting any real effort into it. That I could lose weight without counting something, calories, carbs, fat, or really anything. That I could lose weight without bothering to write down what I was eating. That I could lose weight without exercising even a little. That weight loss should be easy and all I had to do was just watch what I ate.

SCraver
10-21-2010, 04:16 PM
Arms especially can show a huge improvement with adding a bit of muscle and losing fat at the same time. :carrot: No one can have muscle definition until we lose the layer of fat on top of the muscle, so stripping away fat while strengthening and building muscle will make awesome arms!

And a little bit of muscle will go a long way on arms. Think about a one pound steak -- it's mostly muscle and it takes up a lot of room. If you wrapped a one pound steak around your arm, you'd have some pretty impressive biceps, right? (visions of Lady GaGa's meat dress :lol:)

HAHHAA!! That makes sense! Thanks for the visual! I find it really... actually... kinda fun lately trying to build up a little muscle. Even in my thinnest days, I had thick arms. I have decided to embrace my beefy arms and just try to turn them into muscle!

Meg
10-21-2010, 04:17 PM
I thank you, Matt, for helping me attain catharsis this afternoon.

Why does attaining catharsis sound like a colon cleanse? :lol:

mandalinn82
10-21-2010, 04:19 PM
CatharsisCleanse (tm). I will be rich!

mandalinn82
10-21-2010, 04:21 PM
My biggest pet peeve is the assertion that there is ANY perfect solution that works for everyone.

Oh, and also that "obsessive" thing Meg mentioned for maintenance. Makes me positively batty.

saef
10-21-2010, 04:21 PM
Ooooh, Meg, that's one myth we forgot: The colon cleanse.

I'm not going there, since I've already had my catharsis for the day & am plumb CLEANED OUT.

matt_H
10-21-2010, 04:25 PM
I'm not going there, since I've already had my catharsis for the day & am plumb CLEANED OUT.

HAHA!

It is nearing 5pm and unfortunately I am going to have to evacuate this thread.

kaplods
10-21-2010, 04:26 PM
Water weight. What the heck is it, really? How is actual fat weight different from water weight, and how do we KNOW which one it is? I think it's water weight when we want to make someone feel better. Or make ourselves feel better. At least, that's how I use this distinction.

For me, water weight is very distinctive. My face, wrists, ankles, and fingers swell disproportionately. If my wedding ring is tight (which is normally very loose), it's almost always water retention. How do I know? Because when I gain and lose 10 lbs in three days (as I do every month) it is clearly water weight. While I suppose it's theoretically possible to gain 10 lbs in a couple days, there's no logical way to lose it again that quickly. Dropping ten pounds in two days screams water retention (or amputation), not fat loss.

If I gain 10 lbs while eating 1500 calories a day, I know it's water weight, because logically it can't be anything else (there's no way to gain 10 lbs in three days on 1500 calories. Even if I could somehow stop my metabolism altogheter - it would take 35000 calories, not 4500 to gain 10 lbs.

Edema (water retention) can be measured, so it's not entirely impossible to tell from fat weight. One of the best do-it-yourself indicators is the thumbprint test. If you press into your skin for 5 seconds and then let go, if the impression doesn't disappear almost instaneously - you're definitely dealing with some level of water retention (called pitting edema). If the skin snaps back and doesn't leave the mark you could still have edema (called non-pitting edema), but if there's an at-home test for non-pitting edema, I don't know it.

I don't count my 8-10 lbs of weight gain during my period, because it appears and disappears within (at most) a 5 day period. When I was heavier it was a 10 to 15 lb gain (and if I ate according to cravings, I could end up keeping some of that weight as "real" weight, up to about 5 lbs, but if I stay on plan I know it all will disappear.

Of course it's possible to delude yourself into believing fat gain is water gain, but when you experience water gain regularly, there are definite clues as to which you're dealing with.

It would drive me batty to consider those inevitable 10 lbs a true gain every month, especially when I know they'll disappear within a couple days as long as I eat on plan, and drink a little extra water (which speeds up the water-shedding process).

SCraver
10-21-2010, 04:29 PM
Ooooh, Meg, that's one myth we forgot: The colon cleanse.

I'm not going there, since I've already had my catharsis for the day & am plumb CLEANED OUT.

THAT IS ANOTHER one I totally forgot!! My friend does cleanses all the time... and I am like - wtf? Cleanses are such a crock! If your bowls aren't emptying themselves regularly - get thee to the dr.!

calluna
10-21-2010, 04:34 PM
Oh, ye gods, if I laugh any harder I shall have an unanticipated and undesirable cleansing experience!! :rofl:

rockinrobin
10-21-2010, 04:48 PM
Well the starvation mode theory is right up there for me.

A few others:

-Folks complaining that they are slow losers, but in actuality, they're not staying faithful to their plan. There's nothing wrong with not staying faithful to your plan, but then you can't complain that you're a slow loser.

-Another myth I love (not)- the slower you take it off - the better the chances are that you'll keep it off - ummm, no. The speed (or lack thereof) at which you take off the weight has ZERO to do with whether or not you will put the weight back on.

-Love the cheat meal will shake things up one. Keep that metabolism guessing. Metabolism guessing? I don't think sooooo.

-Then there's of course the "you're going to slow down/ruin your metabolism".

-That a plateau is inevitable.

-1200 calories is taboo and G-d forbid you should ever drop a calorie below that number. Disaster is sure to hit you.

carter
10-21-2010, 04:50 PM
"Organic" on the label means low calorie and healthy (i.e. organic, whole wheat chocolate chip cookies :fr:).


Wow, are there people who really believe this? I've only ever heard people say it tongue-in-cheek.

This is a good thread. It's good to see all the common misconceptions in one place. The ones that get under my skin the most have already been mentioned - the idea that lifting bulks you up like Ahnold, the notion that if you don't lose 1-2 pounds every week like a clockwork automaton you have "stalled" or "hit a plateau" or are "failing." So I won't belabor these.

There is another common misconception I see, that makes me more sad than peevish - the notion that one can lose weight without making any major changes. I'm sure you've all seen them - posts like "I'm so tired of being fat! I'm ready to make a change. Can you suggest some ideas for me? Oh, I can't bear the notion of measuring and journaling all my food, it's such a hassle. And I hate all vegetables, yuk. And I have to have a cheat day on Sundays because that's when I go out for pizza and beer with my friends. And I simply can't bear to give up my daily super-grande caramel-sugarbombacchino, LOL."

Okay, a little hyperbole there. But I do sometimes see folks who haven't yet figured out what seems so obvious to me now - if you don't make any changes, you stay just the way you are. I feel sad, because I see a person who is unhappy with herself yet not mentally prepared for the real work of changing. (I also, I admit, worry for my own commitment to the hard work!) But anyway, it's fortunate that this board is so full of good, smart people who are more diplomatic than I am who can help those folks, so I can just keep mah mouth shut. :^:

PaulaM
10-21-2010, 05:02 PM
Great thread! I could talk on this subject all day, having lived through every diet craze since the 60s.

Don't mean to ruffle any feathers, this is just my personal opinion: people who diet to a "normal" weight and think they are healthy but don't ever do a lick of exercise. No, you are thin, but you're not in shape, no way no how.

People who say they have NEVER had a craving or desire to cheat while they are dieting. You may not have actually gone off plan, but I can't believe anybody who gained 100 lbs doesn't miss the taste, smell, feeling of eating whatever you want, maybe not now but at some point of the process.

People who say oh food is not an addiction. If you're in this 100 lbs forum, it certainly was one of yours at one time or another.

No letters please LOL.

beerab
10-21-2010, 05:23 PM
My favorite weight loss myth pet peeve is one that I tried to make true for many years - that I could lose weight without putting any real effort into it. That I could lose weight without counting something, calories, carbs, fat, or really anything. That I could lose weight without bothering to write down what I was eating. That I could lose weight without exercising even a little. That weight loss should be easy and all I had to do was just watch what I ate.



There is another common misconception I see, that makes me more sad than peevish - the notion that one can lose weight without making any major changes. I'm sure you've all seen them - posts like "I'm so tired of being fat! I'm ready to make a change. Can you suggest some ideas for me? Oh, I can't bear the notion of measuring and journaling all my food, it's such a hassle. And I hate all vegetables, yuk. And I have to have a cheat day on Sundays because that's when I go out for pizza and beer with my friends. And I simply can't bear to give up my daily super-grande caramel-sugarbombacchino, LOL."

OMG these! One of my severly overweight friends says to me "Bee, I want to lose weight too, you have inspired me to try." I'm all like GREAT! That's awesome!

She proceeds to ask me what I do and this is what I get:

"Oh I don't like to cook."

"Oh I hate exercise."

"Oh I don't want to track my calories."

"Or carbs."

So I said "oh then I guess you aren't really ready to lose cuz it's hard work."

To which she replies with "I don't understand why I'm overweight- I NEVER eat" (as she is eating CHINESE with a LARGE mountain Dew...)

Seriously I feel bad for her but I'm not pushing her when I have myself to take care of!

Aclai4067
10-21-2010, 06:48 PM
I haven't read all of these, but I agree with the OPs pet peeve about starvation mode. I actually read a post once where someone claimed to be morbidly obese because of starvation mode. It doesn't work that way.

Another pet peeve is when people correct you and say that muscle does not weight more than fat because a pound of muscle is still a pound and a pound of fat is still a pound. A square inch of muscle weighs more than a square inch of fat, no? When people say muscle weighs more, they mean per given volume and you know that. A pound of feathers is a pound and a pound of rocks is also a pound. But most people generally agree that rocks are heavier than feathers.

GirlyGirlSebas
10-21-2010, 07:03 PM
I hate being told that I must eat breakfast or 6 small meals a day and never go over 3 hours without eating. What if I'm just not hungry at that time? Didn't I go beyond 100+ pounds by eating for reasons other than hunger and feeding myself well past the point of hunger?

Lyn2007
10-21-2010, 07:23 PM
I get tired of:

"Oh, you're not eating enough, you're going into starvation mode!" Um, since when did anyone ever starve while eating over 100 grams of protein a day??

and

"You're losing MUSCLE, not fat!" Uh, excuse me, but if even a QUARTER of the 99 pounds I've lost was muscle I would have looked way, way, WAY different at 278 pounds!!

Everyday Miracles
10-21-2010, 07:25 PM
The one that's been getting on my nerves lately is that the only way to lose weight is to eat a raw vegan diet. I keep having this pushed at me and I am totally not the kind of person who could give up all meat altogether. It was hard enough to lose the pork and shellfish! I am trying to replace as much of my meat with fish as possible, but I do just love my beef. And yes, I am losing weight. I just started but I'm down 3 lbs and the Kosher diet is making me feel so much better that I'm able to be more active and motivated :d

Bac0s
10-21-2010, 08:01 PM
I agree with SO many of these.

Starvation mode makes me shake my head. Really? Have you ever seen someone who suffers from anorexia? Because shouldn't starvation mode go into effect there?

The other one that kills me is the slow loser complainers. I have a friend who lost 40 pounds in the last year and a half. We started at about the same weight, and I lost 40 lbs in about 3.5-4 months. When she found out, she told me, "I can't lose that fast." Really? I couldn't figure out if she really believed that or if she was trying to negate all the extremely hard work I've put into this.

Krizstyling
10-21-2010, 09:05 PM
I hope this works because it is VERY funny, I found this and thought, yeah this about sums it up!

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=30748022&id=1340650359&ref=mf#!/photo.php?pid=15341103&id=856555491&fbid=10150270175920492

kaplods
10-21-2010, 10:44 PM
I agree with SO many of these.

Starvation mode makes me shake my head. Really? Have you ever seen someone who suffers from anorexia? Because shouldn't starvation mode go into effect there?

The other one that kills me is the slow loser complainers. I have a friend who lost 40 pounds in the last year and a half. We started at about the same weight, and I lost 40 lbs in about 3.5-4 months. When she found out, she told me, "I can't lose that fast." Really? I couldn't figure out if she really believed that or if she was trying to negate all the extremely hard work I've put into this.


Or maybe she's telling the truth.

I could sincerely and factually say the same to my younger self. When I was in my 20's (at a lower weight), I could lose 7-10 lbs a week (and often did) on the calorie level I now can barely lose any weight on now. I can't be as physically active because of health issues, but even that isn't enough to medically account for the huge discrepancy.

When I was younger, it didn't seem to matter what I ate as long as I restricted calories - I seemed to lose the same amount of weight on 1800 calories of high-carb as 1800 calories of low-carb. Now to lose weight I can either choose 1800 calories of low-carb, or 1200 calories of high-carb (and still lose less weight than on the 1800 calories of low-carb). I'm also less hungry on 1800 calories of low-carb as on 4000 calories of high-carb (no amount of high-carb foods seems to be "enough" to keep insane hunger at bay).

Not everyone will lose weight at the same rate, even if their starting weights and calorie/exercise levels are identical. '' And "I can't lose that fast," whether meant physically or mentally may be legitimate.

It sounds like a load of crap, of course. I didn't believe it at first myself either, but my food journals proved me wrong, and I gained a new respect for low-carb diets (it took two doctor's recommendations one from a doctor who'd lost almost 100 lbs on low-carb herself, to convince me that low-carb diets cound be healthy).


And starvation mode may be a myth in terms of the reasons why weight loss can stall at low-calorie levels. However, there've been a lot of people who've found that raising their calorie level helped them lose more rapidly than on lower levels. There are a lot of possible reasons - more energy to exercise, or less hunger leading to secret binging.

I think most of the dieting myths have a "grain" of truth. The problem comes when you assume one side of the coin, and never give the other side a shot.

During 90% of my dieting life I never gave low-carb diets a serious shot, because I "knew" that low-carb diets were unhealthy and even dangerous. "A calorie is a calorie."

I find it's the only diet I can lose weight and control hunger on. I'm not such a convert that I think everyone should be on a low-carb diet - but my food log proved it was not only the best diet for weight loss, it was the best diet to control my symptoms of fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, rosacea, seborrheic dermatitis, and autoimmune disease. If I start eating large amounts of carbs (eve "good carbs," like fresh fruit) I will start to see symptoms (and it's not just me - hubby can tell if I've eaten wheat or a large amount of carbs, just by looking at my face, because my complexion is clear when I'm eating on-plan, and I have rash issues if I'm not).

I think testing the diet dogma is a really good thing. Use your food journal and look for patterns. You may find that some things you believed in don't make any difference at all, and some of the things you thought were ridiculous do seem to apply to you.

You have to do the experiments repeatedly, because coincidence can make you think you see patterns that aren't there - but with each repeat of the experiment, the less likely you're imagining the results.

angelskeep
10-21-2010, 11:00 PM
The "all you have to do is exercise more". And this is coming from a person who knows exercise has been a big positive factor in my weight loss. But I hear this over and over again from men who want their wives or girlfriends to continue to eat (with them) like they always have, but "work out as much as Cary" to get my body. Well boys, 6 hours per week of exercise isn't going to do it if she still shares pizza and beer with you and all the other eating traditions couples can fall into.

Whew, that feels good to get that out.

:rofl: I could spend 24 hours a day exercising and it wouldn't take care of the bad habits Robert & I can easily fall into. He actually exercises with me and eats similarly to me and has lost about 20 lbs as well, though he wasn't terribly overweight to start with. It would be very easy to get into the beer and pizza (or in our case ice cream and fudge) routine and I must remain ever vigilant, especially when we are out of town for business!

I think it isn't just the guys who believe that most people can walk around the block once a week and then eat whatever they want...and they seem surprised when I tell them the amount of walking I normally do.

Maybe it's one of myt pet peeves then that people seem to think it's easy not to just lose, but to keep from gaining...

Barb

AZ Sunrises
10-21-2010, 11:16 PM
"I've been dieting and exercising for two weeks, and I'm only down 12 lbs. This just isn't working. I give up."

You know what. Yes...yes you should. Give up, shove ho-hos in your mouth, have a tub of Ben & Jerry's and see how much better you feel afterward. Have half a large pizza and a bucket of KFC while you're at it. Just shut up. :mad:

Not every n00b bothers me when s/he does it, but the ones seeking attention are pathetically obvious, and I just...want...to...kick...them...in...the...throat .

Everyday Miracles
10-21-2010, 11:23 PM
"I've been dieting and exercising for two weeks, and I'm only down 12 lbs. This just isn't working. I give up."


Do people really say that? I'm thrilled with 1 lb a week, even though I know that I can do better than that. Of course, I'm changing one bad habit at a time, and that takes time. My weight loss will probably be slow and steady until I reach the point where I'm really "on the program." And then you watch, I'll plateau :P

ubergirl
10-21-2010, 11:29 PM
I can definitely say that one of my PET PEEVES is people who think that plateaus are caused by cheating or that slow losers must not be telling the truth about staying on plan. There is definitely a group of people, and I'm one of them, who stall out at certain points. It's frustrating, but if you don't accept it as part of the process, you might be likely to give up.

I also HATE the "starvation mode" myth. The idea that we, the overfed, are starving is simply ludicrous. Go visit a third world country. You'll find people who eat very little and do hard field work all day. And yet, none of them are gaining weight.

On the other hand, "water weight" is real. I have a Tanita scale that measures body fat and water fat percentages. When I have puffy ankles, for example, after a long drive or working a long day, my body weight will always go up 2-3 pounds and I can also see that my water weight percentage increases on the scale.

StephanieM
10-21-2010, 11:57 PM
I hate weight lifting myths the most.

I hate when pilates and yoga classes make the claim they can "lengthen" your muscles. You cannot detatch your muscle and re attach it farther down!

Women do not get bulky!

Multiple reps with light weights does not build muscle like 10-12 reps of nice and heavy ones :D

Butch up, ladies! It's for your own femininity.

kaplods
10-22-2010, 01:24 AM
I think "starvation mode" is a poorly worded term for several legitimately occuring phenomena. Some people use the term "conservation mode," which isn't necessarily any more descriptive term for the same phenomena.

In essence the terms are used to describe the experience of many dieters who found that increasing their calorie level results in more rapid or more consistent weight loss. The experience is so common, that it can't be dismissed as delusions and lies. Some of the people have to be telling the truth - they lose more weight when they eat above a certain calorie level.

It's a fairly straight forward experiment - use your food journal diligently and see what happens. Make sure the experiment is several weeks or months long (not just a day or week).

I've found that I can eat more calories and lose more weight on low-carb than high-carb. The difference is 350 to 500 calories. I didn't believe it at first, so I repeated the experiment over and over. Does it mean that my body goes into "starvation mode" when I eat high-carb vlcd's. I don't like to use the term, but the facts are that I have to restrict calories to ridiculously low levels to lose weight on high-carb eating. Call it what you will, but switching to low-carb allows me to eat more and yet lose more. It doesn't seem possible if you believe "a calorie is a calorie," which I no longer do - not in the sense that most people mean it.

Calories are still a reality and you can't gain more than a pound of fat from less than 3500 calories of any food - but different foods seem to have different effects on the rate of metabolic burn - the "calories out" part of the equation - at least for some people (it seemed that low-carb and high-carb were much more equivalent when I was much younger, but I never gave low-carb very long trials, so I can't really even say that for sure).

While the name starvation mode is misleading, it doesn't change the experience of many people that the lowest possible calorie level doesn't always lead to the quickest possible weight loss.

Jojo381972
10-22-2010, 01:25 AM
My biggest pet peeve is people that assume that all fat people are lazy pigs, and could easily lose weight. It is true that some fat people are lazy, but the truth is that some people are 'fat' because of possible medical reasons, and that food is often an addiction in which some people have no idea how hard it can be to lose weight. I have met several ignorant people that are so mean towards 'fat' people that they have no idea.

Another pet peeve is when women don't want to lift weights because they fear they'll become too big. As talked about in this thread, it is not easy to gain a huge amount of muscle for women. Gaining a lot of muslce takes time and you have to lift very heavy weights. Gaining muscle tone will actually help us lose weight in the long run. The more muscle we have, the faster we burn calories and rev up our metabolism.

krampus
10-22-2010, 01:49 AM
I'd say my biggest pet peeve are people who are unhappy with their weight who complain all day long and do nothing to fix it.

Robin41
10-22-2010, 03:41 AM
The one that drives me insane is when people try to blame weight gain or water retention on diet soda, "because it has so much sodium in it".

No, no it does not. It has no calories, no carbs, and 35 mg. of sodium (less than 1% of your RDA). For comparison's sake, half a cup of 2% cottage cheese has 410 mg. That diet soda is not your problem.

rockinrobin
10-22-2010, 06:19 AM
Another peeve - blaming being overweight on *genetics* or *slow metabolism*.

I personally think weight gain comes more from environment/home life than genetics.. But even if there is a genetic component, and even if one does have a slower metabolism than the next one - makes no difference. It may be harder for one person to achieve a calorie deficit than the next - but so what. You just have to work it out. Just like one person may struggle more with math than the next, or reading or , or, or.... We are all made differently and have to adjust our lifestyles according to meet those differences.

ValRock
10-22-2010, 07:00 AM
The slow metabolism argument drives me BONKERS and I used to use it!!!

No. I wasn't fat because I had bad genetics or because I have a slow metabolism or because I'm "big boned". I was fat because I ate too much, didn't know enough about nutrition and general, and didn't move my body enough to compensate for my bad diet and lack of knowledge.

I wish with all my heart that public schools would teach nutrition in a more comprehensive way. I can't think of anything more important in a person's everyday life and it barely gets skimmed!!! My 6th graders can do quadratic equations but they can't tell me how many calories are in an apple or why broccoli is a better choice than Dorito's. Honestly it scares the living daylights out of me.

CJZee
10-22-2010, 07:36 AM
A different take on "starvation mode". Here is a summation of what Gary Taubes says in his brilliant and well-researched book, "Good Calories, Bad Calories".
... we can be fat and still be starving because our bodies cannot access the fat ... and this drives us to eat frequently, particularly high-carbs so glucose is immediately available. This is a physical need, our body is trying to survive and we cannot blame it for that.


Those of us who are still fighting our bodies on this really really struggle because, while we might not be technically "starving" our bodies "think" we are.

How many times have you seen pictures of poor women with starving babies, and yet their own body mass is relatively high?


My belief is the way to break the back of this addiction is to cut back on sugar and grains. Many of us on this board have discovered this through our own experimentation. (I do not think cutting back on sugar, grains and carbs in general is necessary for everyone, but I do think it's true for many many people.)

Eliana
10-22-2010, 08:38 AM
I can definitely say that one of my PET PEEVES is people who think that plateaus are caused by cheating or that slow losers must not be telling the truth about staying on plan. There is definitely a group of people, and I'm one of them, who stall out at certain points. It's frustrating, but if you don't accept it as part of the process, you might be likely to give up.

I also HATE the "starvation mode" myth. The idea that we, the overfed, are starving is simply ludicrous. Go visit a third world country. You'll find people who eat very little and do hard field work all day. And yet, none of them are gaining weight.

On the other hand, "water weight" is real. I have a Tanita scale that measures body fat and water fat percentages. When I have puffy ankles, for example, after a long drive or working a long day, my body weight will always go up 2-3 pounds and I can also see that my water weight percentage increases on the scale.

Yep on all counts.

When I complain that I am "off plan" it means I had one handful too many of nuts or it means I had 200 calories of chocolate when I'm trying to cut chocolate out. Other than that, I'm perfectly on plan and yet I'm among the slow losers. I have to eat 1000 calories or less these days to lose and that's with killer workouts at the gym. That's HARD I tell you! :D

Eliana
10-22-2010, 08:42 AM
I hate the "big boned" thing mainly because my mother always used it on me! Because I'm 5'4" to her 4'9" she thought I was big boned and that was her excuse for my weight gain forever. No, I am not big boned! I wear size 4.5 ring, my wrist is 5 and 3/4 inches and I wear a narrow AAAA shoe. No. :no: I am NOT big boned. I got FAT.

ETA: Matt, I love you for this thread! :D It just feels good!

time2lose
10-22-2010, 08:51 AM
My first reaction to this thread was, 'Ohhhhhh, here comes a big argument!!" I am please though, some of us disagree but we have done so in a respectful way.

I don't want to argue but I just can't keep quiet on some of these. :)

Slow losers - Yes, some of us do lose slower than others even on plan. :wave: I am one. At one time comments that a slow loser must be eating more than they admit to, drove me crazy. At Weight Watchers, I would stall out for weeks. If I talked to the leader (and I talked to several), I would be told that I must not have been accurately counting my points when I knew that I was. No, the problem was that they allowed me more points than my body needed. Sometimes I don't think that it is fair, but my body simply does not need as many calories as some of yours. Age could be affecting it now, but I have always been that way. People are different. That is why there can be a standard recommended medication that works for most people with a specific disease but it won't work for everyone with that disease. The calorie calculators make me laugh. I get jealous sometimes. Someone that comes to mind is Rosinante. We are the same age and the same height. I have seen her post several times that at 1400 to 1500 calories, she can lose 1 to 2 pounds a week. (Sorry, Rosinante, if I got it wrong. I love you but am jealous of you!) Even at this high weight, I maintain on 1400 - 1500 calories. I lose slowly in the 1200 - 1250 range, less than a pound a week. It sucks but that is just the way it is. Slow metabolism I think, even if everyone doesn't think that could be possible. :) I am considering dropping to 1100 for a while to create more of a calorie deficit to lose a little faster.

That calorie deficit leads me to the last "myth" that I want to give my 2 cents worth on, "starvation mode". :) I like the term that kaplods used, "conservation mode". My doctor explained it to me in a way that made sense to me.

Imagine that your house is heated with gas and you believe that you have one tank of gas to heat your house for the winter. Afraid that the tank won’t last all winter, you conserve the gas as much as possible. You lower the thermostat. You turn the heat off on cool, but not cold, days. You insulate as much as possible. You close off rooms that you don’t need. You make that tank last longer than it normally does, but even with all your conservation, you eventually run out of gas.

Our bodies work the same way. If they believe that a famine is on the way, they will try to make our stored fat last as long as possible. Our metabolism goes down and we become fuel conserving machines. Some people’s bodies conserve better than others. My doctor called these people the “survivors”. This explains why during real famines some people survive and others don’t. It explains why some people survived concentration camps while others didn’t, even though they were in the same circumstances. But there is one big truth. Even the survivors would die if kept from food long even. The body can conserve fat but there are limits.

The ideal way to lose weight is to keep the body from thinking there is a famine coming so that it burns fat freely. However, even if our bodies go into “starvation” mode, it will keep burning the fat and will eventually burn it all up. We just have to keep up creating a calorie deficit and we will lose the weight!

Thanks for listening. Just my 2 cents worth. :)

time2lose
10-22-2010, 08:54 AM
Eliana originally posted I hate the "big boned" thing mainly because my mother always used it on me!

Here is one that really makes me smile. I used it when I was a teenager but had to finally admit to myself that my bones could not weigh over 200 pounds, there had to be fat there too!

rockinrobin
10-22-2010, 09:17 AM
I gotta clarify here.

When I stated about those who complain about being slow losers and then we go on to discover that they've *been off plan*, that's one thing.

I am certain there a more than a few who are definitely 1000% on plan and are STILL slow losers. Those are not the ones that I was speaking of.

For the bunch here who are 1000% faithful to plan and are still slow losers and even face frequent stalls - my hat, shirt and everything else goes off to you. You guys are something else. Your perseverance and dedication are quite remarkable. Quite frankly, not sure what I would have done or how I would have handled it had that been the case with me. Extra kudos to you and you know who the you(s) are. :hug:

Bac0s
10-22-2010, 09:23 AM
Or maybe she's telling the truth.

I could sincerely and factually say the same to my younger self. When I was in my 20's (at a lower weight), I could lose 7-10 lbs a week (and often did) on the calorie level I now can barely lose any weight on now. I can't be as physically active because of health issues, but even that isn't enough to medically account for the huge discrepancy.

When I was younger, it didn't seem to matter what I ate as long as I restricted calories - I seemed to lose the same amount of weight on 1800 calories of high-carb as 1800 calories of low-carb. Now to lose weight I can either choose 1800 calories of low-carb, or 1200 calories of high-carb (and still lose less weight than on the 1800 calories of low-carb). I'm also less hungry on 1800 calories of low-carb as on 4000 calories of high-carb (no amount of high-carb foods seems to be "enough" to keep insane hunger at bay).

Not everyone will lose weight at the same rate, even if their starting weights and calorie/exercise levels are identical. '' And "I can't lose that fast," whether meant physically or mentally may be legitimate.

It sounds like a load of crap, of course. I didn't believe it at first myself either, but my food journals proved me wrong, and I gained a new respect for low-carb diets (it took two doctor's recommendations one from a doctor who'd lost almost 100 lbs on low-carb herself, to convince me that low-carb diets cound be healthy).


And starvation mode may be a myth in terms of the reasons why weight loss can stall at low-calorie levels. However, there've been a lot of people who've found that raising their calorie level helped them lose more rapidly than on lower levels. There are a lot of possible reasons - more energy to exercise, or less hunger leading to secret binging.

I think most of the dieting myths have a "grain" of truth. The problem comes when you assume one side of the coin, and never give the other side a shot.

During 90% of my dieting life I never gave low-carb diets a serious shot, because I "knew" that low-carb diets were unhealthy and even dangerous. "A calorie is a calorie."

I find it's the only diet I can lose weight and control hunger on. I'm not such a convert that I think everyone should be on a low-carb diet - but my food log proved it was not only the best diet for weight loss, it was the best diet to control my symptoms of fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, rosacea, seborrheic dermatitis, and autoimmune disease. If I start eating large amounts of carbs (eve "good carbs," like fresh fruit) I will start to see symptoms (and it's not just me - hubby can tell if I've eaten wheat or a large amount of carbs, just by looking at my face, because my complexion is clear when I'm eating on-plan, and I have rash issues if I'm not).

I think testing the diet dogma is a really good thing. Use your food journal and look for patterns. You may find that some things you believed in don't make any difference at all, and some of the things you thought were ridiculous do seem to apply to you.

You have to do the experiments repeatedly, because coincidence can make you think you see patterns that aren't there - but with each repeat of the experiment, the less likely you're imagining the results.

She could be telling the truth, or her slow loss could be a result of the nightly 3 glasses of wine and bag of m&m's that she chooses to indulge in.

I didn't clarify my peeve with starvation mode -- I get that it can exist, but people use it as the reason behind a stall FAR too often.

Beverlyjoy
10-22-2010, 09:34 AM
I don't like it when people overeat and call themselves 'bad'. They aren't bad - but have undertaken unhelpful behavior. I believe in the 'self-fullfilling prophecy' - where labels can become the truth. I think it's an bad label. (Yes, I can say the word bad lol)

Eliana
10-22-2010, 09:51 AM
Yes, for a LOT of these pet peeves, we are probably simply over generalizing. Many of these things (slow losses, slow metabolism, starvation mode, water retention, etc.) can and do happen, but nearly as often as reported. That's my frustration. We over use these and they become, for many, just big old excuses.

I had a big old excuse for four years! PCOS! I should not have used it as an excuse, but as a hurdle. And frankly, FOR ME, it was a small one.

saef
10-22-2010, 09:58 AM
I understand about water weight from sore muscles, from the menstrual cycle, from eating something salty, from certain medications ... BUT ...

There's some kind of transmutation from water to fat that must occur at some point along the way.

For example, when someone overindulges or downright binges, the scale goes up, and people tell them it's water weight. Yeah, I get that. I've heard the whole explanation of how many calories you'd have to consume to gain a pound.

But ... if this binge or overindulgence happens for three consecutive days, at what point has the person gained real weight, not just water weight?

When is the water transmuted into fat?

Also, if, as I've read, "The human body is anywhere from 55% to 78% water depending on body size." (That's from Wikipedia.) Then isn't a large percentage of our weight really ALWAYS water weight?

Also, when posters get a higher scale reading, people tell them it's water weight, but if the scale is lower, usually no one seems to ask whether they're dehydrated. It is just assumed they lost some "real" weight or fat.

ETA: And further, when people first embark on weight loss effort, and drop a higher amount of weight in the first week or so, they are usually told it's "water weight." The real weight loss apparently does not happen at first, or the fat is mingled with the water. (See, this is what I don't get, how do they distinguish?) But if a maintainer who's already been eating healthily ups & starts a new diet, will he or she also lose a large amount of water weight at the start? Or is that only lost by those with the utterly unhealthy diets beforehand?

Maybe now people can understand some of my confusion regarding the uses of the term "water weight" all over the boards here.

Please, someone point me to something in particular that can clear up when water weight becomes actual weight.

JoJoJo2
10-22-2010, 10:10 AM
I get very irritated by the people who say that they are too old to lose weight. I do know that it is harder for older people to lose those lbs. but it is not impossible. The metabolism slows down, and exercise is more difficult for the senior citizen, but it is still possible to lose weight.

I did. I lost over 60 lbs. in my late 70s and early 80s. I know of other older people who have lost weight, and kept it off.

But there is that unfortunate myth out there that older people can't lose weight.

Eliana
10-22-2010, 10:32 AM
I get very irritated by the people who say that they are too old to lose weight. I do know that it is harder for older people to lose those lbs. but it is not impossible. The metabolism slows down, and exercise is more difficult for the senior citizen, but it is still possible to lose weight.

I did. I lost over 60 lbs. in my late 70s and early 80s. I know of other older people who have lost weight, and kept it off.

But there is that unfortunate myth out there that older people can't lose weight.

That's a whole other thread! :D I know there are a lot of myths out there about many other things related to older people.

You're awesome! :carrot:

krampus
10-22-2010, 10:38 AM
This just in: I can't stand when I post a picture of my food and people all respond telling me what's wrong with my meal nutritionwise. Tonight for dinner I had a small block of tofu (hidden under bok choy) and a bunch of veggies/fruit - bok choy, cherry tomatoes, kimchi and prunes - and I thought it looked cute on the little plates so I uploaded a photo to facebook. 3 people commented saying "you need a protein" or "you should eat meat with that" etc.

SCraver
10-22-2010, 10:46 AM
This just in: I can't stand when I post a picture of my food and people all respond telling me what's wrong with my meal nutritionwise. Tonight for dinner I had a small block of tofu (hidden under bok choy) and a bunch of veggies/fruit - bok choy, cherry tomatoes, kimchi and prunes - and I thought it looked cute on the little plates so I uploaded a photo to facebook. 3 people commented saying "you need a protein" or "you should eat meat with that" etc.

What!? Tofu is protein.

krampus
10-22-2010, 10:54 AM
I know it is! But it's not visible in the photo.

Mind your own business, Facebook friends! >_<

shcirerf
10-22-2010, 12:13 PM
I know the colon cleanse was mentioned, but it's my big pet peeve right now.
You must clean your colon, there's all that stuff stuck in there! OMG!:yikes: And it just keeps building and building. I finally said to a friend who is big on this, don't ya think if we weren't emptying out good and all that stuff was really building up, that at some point in time we would all just explode from a poo overload? :?:

19Deltawifey
10-22-2010, 12:13 PM
My pet peeve is when people who are or were on the same birth control (copper iud, heck if some would google it they would find thousands of other women who also gained) as me and say "oh that bc doesn't cause weight gain"! Yeah that annoys me when someone assumes that they know my body better then me, and now that it is out I am able to lose weight with diet and exercise which I have been doing for the past 2 years! Heck I've been a runner for a while now and was still gaining even though I was eating 1200-1800 cals a day. I guess the weight loss after having it removed is just a coincidence. Of course it doesn't cause weight gain in everyone but for those women that it does cause weight gain in, its a slap in the face when people accuse us of not trying hard enough or they say "I lost weight with it in". Just like certain prescription meds, diets, bc etc affect people differently, some gain some lose. There is no one size fits all. rant over

Kaplods-"I think most of the dieting myths have a "grain" of truth. The problem comes when you assume one side of the coin, and never give the other side a shot."

So true Kaplods

19Deltawifey
10-22-2010, 12:16 PM
I know the colon cleanse was mentioned, but it's my big pet peeve right now.
You must clean your colon, there's all that stuff stuck in there! OMG!:yikes: And it just keeps building and building. I finally said to a friend who is big on this, don't ya think if we weren't emptying out good and all that stuff was really building up, that at some point in time we would all just explode from a poo overload? :?:

LOL about the explosion from the poo overload.

kaplods
10-22-2010, 07:11 PM
This thread reminded me of a quote I heard or read (either from a stand-up comic or a newspaper columnist). Something to the effect of:

I have coping mechanisms, everyone else has delusions.