100 lb. Club - I don't really cook anymore




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Eliana
09-02-2010, 11:46 AM
That's not really true. I cook every day. But my "cooking" is rather boring because I feel limited in what I can cook that I know is healthy.

This is hard to explain.

Old Eliana was the queen of casseroles and my freezer was full of them. I cooked up a storm once a month and filled my freezer to overflowing with delicious...horrible...meals. And I felt like I was feeding my family well.

Now, my poor children! LOL! Dinner last night was stir fry of cabbage, broccoli, pine nuts, almonds, spinach, tomatoes and leftover pork. But I don't feel like I was cooking because I just threw it all together.

I think I'm in a recipe rut. I'm pretty picky about what I eat now, and I have some definite standbys.

I miss my casseroles! :rofl: Not the taste...just the thought. I don't feel like I'm feeding my family well. Like my children are not going to grow up saying, "Oh remember mom's _______. No one makes it like she does."


ubergirl
09-02-2010, 12:01 PM
Don't worry Eliana-- the other day, after being away for a few days and not eating our usual fare, I made fish, broccoli, and salad, and my daughters were saying "oh it's so great to eat delicious healthy food again..."

Lori Bell
09-02-2010, 12:08 PM
I totally know what you mean. Last night I tried a new "healthy" recipe for a Baked Rosemary/lemon chicken. After the first bite or so the family went searching for the BBQ sauce, and then my 11 year old son nearly cried out, "MOM, when are you going to FRY chicken again...yours is the BEST". I felt guilty.

I do make some of their favorites now and then and just eat something different, but I reserve that for Birthdays and special occasions instead of because it's Wednesday now. Maybe they'll thank me later in life...when they decide they need to take off a few pounds and actually have a clue on what healthy food is...:shrug:


lolcat
09-02-2010, 12:12 PM
I know exactly what you mean, Eliana..... I used to spend 2 hours on a single meal, and feel like I had accomplished something. Now I spend 20 minutes on seasoned tilapia and steamed veggies and feel like it's nothing.... even though it's delicious. I'm feeling rather limited, too. I miss the satisfying feeling of my old style of cooking, but not the food itself.

Nikki6kidsmom
09-02-2010, 12:27 PM
Oh man I can relate. But my problem is I was the baking/ dessert queen and I have lately the guilt has made cave in. While the kids will eat healthier desserts it's just not "Mommy's iced brownies or peanut butter cookies". I am trying to lose the guilt and only do healthy desserts because I have a hard time resisting.

KattoS
09-02-2010, 12:27 PM
I like to experiment myself. And I've noticed my cooking always tastes better using foods I know I like. Its fun to cook food in differnt ways, but I think its the ingrediants themselves that give the meal its pizzaz.

I suggest using things that your family likes to eat and make it more creative. Its always nice to try the healthier approach to an old classic. Like hamburgers or pizza, and even your yummy casseroles. There are several ways to make the usual high-cal junk food into a healthy-low cal treat. Try making chick-pea burgers, a tortilla mexican pizza, or a baked chick breast casserole.

Cheers.

calluna
09-02-2010, 12:28 PM
I've been toying with the idea of a fried chicken using olive oil to fry and flax seed meal for a coating. Not something I'd do every day or eat in quantity, but certainly a treat with possibilities.

time2lose
09-02-2010, 12:31 PM
I identify too. My family misses their favorites. I have lightened a couple of recipes for casseroles that I make every now and then.

Eliana
09-02-2010, 12:34 PM
I've been toying with the idea of a fried chicken using olive oil to fry and flax seed meal for a coating. Not something I'd do every day or eat in quantity, but certainly a treat with possibilities.

I've done that with cornflakes. I'd forgotten about that. I just used an egg wash and dragged the breasts through cornflakes. "Fry" in a tiny amount of oil.

Another chicken trick I discovered is butterflying the breast!! My husband thinks he's eating a whole breast, but it's actually only half. It cooks faster and I think better.

Angie
09-02-2010, 01:24 PM
I can relate -- my options are very limited these days and I'm not the inspired chef I ususally am. I also used to love having a big cooking day and freezing things for the rest of the week.

kuchick
09-02-2010, 01:37 PM
I'm now the queen of what DH calls "bistro cooking" - meaning that I make a lot of wraps with whatever protein is handy (usually shrimp or chicken, sometimes blackened tilapia or a little sliced pork chop) with lettuce, goat cheese, greek yogurt, and the "fancy" salsa from the deli section (I love mango-peach salsa). DH says that if anyone else knew what we eat, they would think we're nuts. I also make veggie chili with pumpkin and mixed dry beans. Strange how the staples in our diet changes.

Eliana
09-02-2010, 01:45 PM
My staples have definitely changed! I love everything I cook! I could live off stir fries. They're simple and I can change the flavor with whatever seasonings I'm in the mood for. No recipe involved.

That's kind of my new thing. No recipes. I think that's why I'm feeling like I'm not a cook, even though that's probably actually the sign of someone who knows what she's doing. :D

I sure wish I knew how to cook fish properly, though. Occasionally it comes out right, but usually it's just awful. I've had the most success with an aluminum packet. We love Bourbon salmon, but mine is just awful.

Bunti
09-02-2010, 01:48 PM
I have to say that several days a week I am even more creative with foods than I ever was. We weren't big casserole eaters, so missing them isn't an issue. But, I have added Thai, Indian, Filipino, Hawaiian and Vietnamese foods to my repertoire, along with using some reduced calorie versions of favorite foods. That works for me, because I need to avoid wheat, and those cuisines used very little wheat, more vegies, and less fat than what I used to cook. I have reduced calorie/higher nutrient versions of some of my families old faves like Fried Chicken, Bavarian Beef with noodles, etc. I "stretch" sour cream and mayo with knox, prepared and whipped-- a trick I learned at a spa I worked in. If I do make a casserole, I scrupulously watch portions, and usually I won't eat them because many contain wheat.

Desserts are the hardest-- haven't come up with many decent substitutes, but do have some low-cal/ wheat free ones that can stand on their own.
And pastries..... so far except for one muffin, I have had to say goodbye to them.

I have searched low cal, low carb, and healthy eating websites to find something that will stop me from being bored.(And stop my family from searching out and bringing home junk cause Mama's not baking anymore1)

Jennie527
09-02-2010, 01:56 PM
I've been toying with the idea of a fried chicken using olive oil to fry and flax seed meal for a coating. Not something I'd do every day or eat in quantity, but certainly a treat with possibilities.

Olive oil doesn't tend to do real well with really high heat, and don't you need that for fried chicken? I have never made fried chicken. Grapeseed oil OTOH does great with high heat cooking. Have you ever tried it? It is incredibly good for you in fact they are comparable nutrition wise. (http://www.ehow.com/about_5397992_olive-vs-grape-seed-oil.html) Olive oil has a smoke point of 320degrees and Grapeseed oil has a smoke point of 420degrees. So, I guess it just depends at what temp you fry your chicken. Just thought I'd let you know! I also really like Grapeseed oil sprinkled on my salads :)

RobinD
09-02-2010, 02:01 PM
This is something I am already struggling a bit with, only 2 weeks into this new cooking/eating style. I have issues with "palate fatigue" and will get very, very bored quickly if my diet starts to feel at all like "people chow" - tasting pretty much the same all the time. Boredom would be my downfall. Also, I love cooking and coming up with new recipes, so I am looking at this as a a new challenge - big, bold flavors and lots of palate variety within the bounds of my diet.

Here's a sauce I just came up with. I didn't measure the first time so this is based on estimated quantities, so I'll need to tweak it. If any of you care to try this and suggest tweaks, I would appreciate it. My ultimate goal is to amass a collection of my own healthy recipes, like a personal cookbook.

RobinD's Creamy Leeky Onion Sauce
by Robin Delargy

Leek, 1 small, chopped small, white and light green parts
1/2 white onion, chopped fine
2 scallions, minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 c white wine
1 cup chicken stock, divided
1 tsp. capers
1 tsp. mustard powder
1 tsp. dried tarragon
1 tsp. dried thyme
2 tsp dried parsley
1/4 tsp. red pepper flakes
juice from 1 large lemon
MCT Oil (or EVOO)
salt

Sauté leek, onion and scallions in 2Tb. MCT oil until they begin to soften. Add garlic, stir until fragrant (approx. 1 minute). Add 1/4 cup chicken stock, reduce heat to med-low and cook until reduced by half. Add wine, capers, herbs and red pepper flakes. Cover pan, and simmer until completely soft, adding more stock as needed.

When onions are completely soft, remove from heat and let cool for a few minutes. Puree in blender or food processor, slowly adding the rest of the stock and 2 Tb. more oil. Blend until smooth, scraping often. Add salt to taste. Serve warm or chilled (for a firmer texture).

Terrific with fish, chicken or pork.

Hugs,
Robin

ANewCreation
09-02-2010, 02:17 PM
I am convinced this is the biggest reason I never even bothered to try to loose weight when my kids were home. Lame? Maybe...

But, in my defense I did make many healthy foods for my family just not as healthy as I do now. We didn't eat a lot of fried foods (I can not make fried chicken to save my life--it was always black on the outside and undercooked on the inside). My guys weren't big dessert eaters so we weren't eating a lot of sweets. But my meatloaf is to die for and that is for special occasions when the boys come home. That and my mashed potatoes....drool. Anyway...

Now that we're empty nesters I don't want to cook. I like assembling food. It's fast, it's quick, it's easy and it's the way I really prefer to eat these days.

My husband is on board with many of the things I make and when he isn't he just goes to the freezer and makes a pizza.

I think it's tough when you're cooking for a family and I'm glad that isn't what I'm having to do these days. But, I do think you may be creating new memories for your families and certainly you're giving them good habits for life. Good job ladies!

Eliana
09-02-2010, 02:25 PM
Olive oil doesn't tend to do real well with really high heat, and don't you need that for fried chicken? I have never made fried chicken. Grapeseed oil OTOH does great with high heat cooking. Have you ever tried it? It is incredibly good for you in fact they are comparable nutrition wise. (http://www.ehow.com/about_5397992_olive-vs-grape-seed-oil.html) Olive oil has a smoke point of 320degrees and Grapeseed oil has a smoke point of 420degrees. So, I guess it just depends at what temp you fry your chicken. Just thought I'd let you know! I also really like Grapeseed oil sprinkled on my salads :)

Dr. Oz had a thing on his show about which oil is better for cooking, olive or canola. I was surprised to hear the answer was "canola". I wished he'd said WHY! Now I know! Thanks!

Eliana
09-02-2010, 02:28 PM
Now that we're empty nesters I don't want to cook. I like assembling food. It's fast, it's quick, it's easy and it's the way I really prefer to eat these days.

My husband is on board with many of the things I make and when he isn't he just goes to the freezer and makes a pizza.

I think it's tough when you're cooking for a family and I'm glad that isn't what I'm having to do these days. But, I do think you may be creating new memories for your families and certainly you're giving them good habits for life. Good job ladies!

That's sweet! I hope so. I love to have my boys help me cut vegetables. They are making their own eggs now and grilled cheese (because I won't make the evil stuff!) Hopefully that will be memory making enough. "Ah, remember when mom used to make us make our own food." :rolleyes: Really though, I think they will have fond memories of cooking with mom, regardless of what it is.

And my boys love to make their own birthday cakes! I thought that was a bit odd, making them make their own, because as a mother/wife, I don't want to make my own cake! Someone else better make that for me! But then I remembered, they actually WANT to and they think it's fun. So we have those memories also.

I guess memories are what you make them.

synger
09-02-2010, 03:04 PM
I sure wish I knew how to cook fish properly, though. Occasionally it comes out right, but usually it's just awful. I've had the most success with an aluminum packet. We love Bourbon salmon, but mine is just awful.

I taught my husband how to poach fish and chicken (he's been doing most of the dinner cooking since he lost his job last year), and he loves it. It's the only way I know of that is almost guaranteed not to ruin fish (other than maybe steaming). Put some broth in a pan, add aromatics (rosemary, garlic, lemon, whatever you like), add the meat, cover and bring just to a simmer. Turn it a couple times. He also learned to steam, but it's more involved so he doesn't do it as much.

Eliana
09-02-2010, 03:17 PM
Synger, thanks! I will try that. I tried steaming it once but it just tasted like boiled fish. Blech.

Arctic Mama
09-02-2010, 03:33 PM
I just go for a balance, we have some really healthy mommy meals (like my grilled dill salmon or keema) and some family favorites, like spaghetti. We also have a Pizza night every Friday to give me a cooking break. Our overall diet is quite healthy, especially when I make healthy breakfasts and lunches for us, but I also have no problem with mixing in some less healthy fare. I'm all about mostly good choices ;)

I do bake, once a week. Mostly it is breakfast food for my husband to grab on the run, like muffins or cinnamon rolls, but even those are whole grain and with healthier twists. The occasional batch of chocolate chip cookies didn't do me in, it was constant bad decisions. I do have to watch myself closely so I don't binge on pizza or cookie dough, but for the most part it isn't causing me problems at this point.


Myself, not cooking for my family? I would just eat ingredients :lol: chicken breasts, salad fixings, fruit... Not a lot of cooking or assembly required!

PinkHoodie
09-02-2010, 09:09 PM
I don't have kids but here is my prespective. My DH still talks about his dad's stir fry. So you never know! Plus I have to give kudos to those who are sticking by feeding their kids healthier. You are setting them up to eat this way the rest of their lives. I know when I was first married, I relied a lot on the meals my dad would make us. Fattening, cheap, and easy. Hence the reason I got up to my highest at 257. So you are teaching your kids something. They will come back to these meals when they grow up.
For me my cooking has changed in the fact that I rotate a lot of the same meals. We eat a lot of chicken and salads. But I don't have the concern of kids, just my big kid aka DH lol. Luckily besides veggies he likes pretty much the rest of the food I put out.
For those who want to make fake fried chicken, seasoning is the important thing, even in KFC...its all about the seasoning. So make sure you don't skimp on that. Instead of using Corn Flakes, try Total. Same idea, but your getting all those nutrients with the chicken. Also because cereal is a no for me, I use Almond Meal. Its SOOOOO yummy!!!
Anywho, just my thoughts. :)

rockinrobin
09-03-2010, 06:04 AM
I prefer canola oil to olive oil. Both *healthy* options. Though they are both healthy, ALL oils have the same 120 calories per tablespoon. Too much of a good or healthy thing - not so good or healthy necessarily. So since frying soaks up a TON of it, I bake instead. Comes out just as good with loads less calories. I was shocked to find this out. I used to just pile on the oil. Yuck. Perhaps if you had the two items (the fried and baked) side by side, you could tell a difference, but we don't. I've also found other methods of cooking chicken - braising, stewed, roasted, grilled, stir-fried, pan-fried.

One of our new family favorites - I dip chicken strips in egg whites and almond breeze, than I coat in a mixture of crushed corn flakes, old fashioned oats, sliced almonds, a little flavored bread crumbs and cayenne pepper. Place on a roasting tray that I spread out about a tsp of canola oil and than spray the strips with cooking spray. Bake in the oven. Delish!

Umm, there are some family favorites that I no longer make. I used to make a phenomenal Sesame Chicken. That is definitely a dish they miss, but I don't think they think about it much anymore. One of these days I will make it again - maybe. Somehow, I just can't bring myself to do it. There's SO much darn oil in it. Not to mention sugar. I did make a lower fat/calorie version - but it really wasn't the same. It WAS very good, but too much of a memory from the old version and there was too much comparison.

But I have found some new family favorites. Like the above recipe. Another new, though not all that new anymore - tomorrow is my 4 year anniversary of my lifestyle change - Roasted Pecan Salmon. This is a memorable dish and my family will say mom makes the very best salmon. Another family favorite - roasted green beans with onions and garlic. Roasted brussel sprouts. They can't get enough when I make cauliflower poppers. They ADORE some of the soups I make. I make the best chicken dishes, besides the one I mentioned - chicken with mushrooms, wine, lemon, rosemary, thyme and parsley. Chicken with peppers, wine and tomatoes. A simply delicious Orange Mandarin Chicken. The moistest, tastiest roasted chicken - on tonight's menu - two daughters (both very recently married) and their husbands coming over for dinner.

I gotta say, I really make some delicious dishes and my kids think I am a fabulous cook, better than anyone elses mom. In fact, when they used to go to friends houses (2 of the kids now married, the third, traveling abroad for her first year of college) , they would always come home complaining of stomach aches. They enjoy everything that I make. And I know they appreciate it.

I did chuck a lot of the old recipes, but boy oh boy, did I create and add in some super, delectable fare! I am proud of how I feed my family. :)

MindiV
09-03-2010, 08:51 AM
I used to love making casseroles and things too, and still do. I just reworked the recipes using lighter ingredients or more veggies or mushrooms in place of half the meat, when using ground beef. I still cook every single day and LOVE it. For me, and this may be weird, cooking is relaxing. It's like...the kitchen becomes chaotic, but at the end you have something to show for it - your reward for the hard work, so to speak.

If only I could skip cleaning up the mess.... :)

katkitten
09-03-2010, 09:34 AM
I have about 20 weight watcher cook books FILLED with great low-cal casserole recipes! lol

rockinrobin
09-03-2010, 10:24 AM
I am convinced this is the biggest reason I never even bothered to try to lose weight when my kids were home. Lame? Maybe...


I actually think this was one of my excuses as well. I didn't want to make my children *suffer*. Ha.

And than I realized *finally*, that it was ludicrous.

I was certainly feeding my family better than me, no question about it. But I wasn't feeding them optimally. And they deserve the best!

We strive to have our kids in the best schools (and within those schools we want them to have the best teachers), in the best neighborhoods, in a lovely home,to give them the best things - why was I not giving them the absolute best food? :dizzy:

I was a great cook before, but I am certain I am a better cook now. I started this venture when my kids were a bit older (:(), but I am certain it wasn't too late. I HAVE taught them that eating well is not something to loathe or fear. That it's not boring and uncomfortable and yucky.

They have learned what good food really is. What those foods are, what they can do for you and how they make you feel - and yes - how good they taste. Lesson learned a little late, but it was indeed learned. In fact, when my daughters got married, for their bridal showers, I presented them each with a cookbook of my recipes. ( Zazzle.com has great custom recipes binders by the way)They are married a short time, but both tell me they love it and will always cherish and USE it. :)

lovemyboy
09-03-2010, 11:07 AM
Robin, what a great idea!

I have a binder where I put print outs of recipes I like. One of my chores this week is cleaning it out and putting some of the new recipes in there. It will also be a lot harder for me to make bad stuff if I no longer have the recipe.

LiliK
09-03-2010, 11:14 AM
And I'm kind of happy that I don't cook much any more.... my husband and I put together meals from the fridge (we usually have a bunch of veggies/fruit and some already-cooked chicken or boiled eggs or something in there). We eat together, but we don't really "fix" meals in the same way, and it's working really well for us. We don't have kids at home, so that may be part of it. But I'm actually really enjoying just walking in the door after a long day and knowing that I can have "dinner" on my plate in 5 to 10 minutes. :) Whew! It's such a relief, in a way. Healthy AND fast.

Lori Bell
09-03-2010, 11:23 AM
I make the best chicken dishes, besides the one I mentioned - chicken with mushrooms, wine, lemon, rosemary, thyme and parsley. Chicken with peppers, wine and tomatoes. A simply delicious Orange Mandarin Chicken. The moistest, tastiest roasted chicken - on tonight's menu - two daughters (both very recently married) and their husbands coming over for dinner.


Hey Robin, if you have time, would you mind posting your version of this recipe? (Or if you already have posted it, point me in the direction). The Rosemary/lemon chicken I made wasn't that great...though it didn't call for mushrooms and wine, which I'm sure would have made it much better.

I have a Rosemary BUSH growing in the garden...(seriously, it's the size of a shrub) and tons of thyme, parsley and garlic as well.

I also have a huge abundance of sage...if you know what it's good for besides turkey/dressing and herbal tea!

Eliana
09-03-2010, 11:57 AM
In fact, when my daughters got married, for their bridal showers, I presented them each with a cookbook of my recipes. ( Zazzle.com has great custom recipes binders by the way)They are married a short time, but both tell me they love it and will always cherish and USE it. :)

My mom did that for me. :D I have a handwritten cookbook of all my favorites growing up. Of course they're all really bad for you...but gosh I treasure it. ;)

rockinrobin
09-03-2010, 12:03 PM
Ah, LoriBell, since I made those recipe books for my girls, I had to get all my recipes down on paper (in the computer), so I've got it... Make it your own, change what you don't like. I remove the skin after it's cooked. Enjoy!

Robin's Onion Wine Chicken

ˇ 6 chicken pieces on the bone
ˇ 2 medium to large onions, sliced thin
ˇ 2 stalks of celery, sliced; optional
1 pkg white mushrooms, sliced
ˇ 1 tsp olive or canola oil
ˇ 2 large garlic cloves, crushed
ˇ ˝ - 3/4 cup (depending on your preference) Marsala cooking wine or any other wine you have
ˇ 3 - 4 tbsp lemon juice (depending on your preference_
ˇ 1/3 cup water
ˇ garlic powder, onion powder, pepper
ˇ 1 tbsp chicken Consommé powder or a small cube
ˇ 1/2 tsp dried rosemary
ˇ 1/2 tsp dried thyme
ˇ Paprika

1. In a 6 quart pot, heat oil. Sauté onions and celery till almost browned. Add crushed garlic and mushrooms.and cook 1 minute.
2. Sprinkle chicken generously, on both sides with garlic powder and onion powder. Sprinkle on a bit of black pepper. Add to pot, skin side up, trying to not overlap them.
3. Add the water, lemon juice and wine.
4. Sprinkle the top of the chicken with rosemary, thyme, onion powder and a little paprika.
5. Cover pot. Bring to a boil. Reduce flame to low and simmer. Cook for about 1 1/4 - 1 ˝ hours.
6. Serve chicken with onions, mushrooms & celery on top.

Here's another rosemary recipe, not one of my own concoctions (like the above one). It looked interesting, so I have it saved on the comp, but I've never tried it:

Skillet Chicken with Orange-Rosemary Sauce
ˇ 4 medium (1 1/4 pounds) skinless, boneless chicken-breast halves
ˇ Salt and pepper
ˇ 1 tablespoon olive oil or Cooking Spray
ˇ 2 medium leeks
ˇ 2 oranges
ˇ 1/2 cup(s) reduced-sodium chicken broth
ˇ 3/4 teaspoon(s) chopped fresh rosemary or dried
1. Place chicken-breast halves between 2 sheets of plastic wrap. With meat mallet or rolling pin, pound breasts to an even 1/2-inch thickness; sprinkle with 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper.
2. In nonstick 12-inch skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat until hot. Add breasts & cook 6 to 7 minutes or until browned on both sides and chicken loses its pink color throughout, turning over once. Transfer to platter; cover with foil to keep warm.
3. While chicken is cooking, trim and thinly slice leeks, then rinse thoroughly in bowl, changing water several times; drain well.
4. To skillet, add leeks; cover and cook over medium-low heat 2 to 3 minutes or until softened, stirring occasionally. Meanwhile, from 1 orange grate 1 tsp. peel and squeeze 1/2 c. juice. Halve and thinly slice a second orange. Set peel and slices aside.
5. To leeks in skillet, add orange juice, chicken broth, rosemary, and any juices from chicken on platter. Increase heat to medium-high and cook 3 minutes to reduce sauce slightly, stirring occasionally. Remove skillet from heat. Stir in reserved orange slices and peel and 1/4 tsp. salt.

duckyyellowfeet
09-03-2010, 02:35 PM
I don't have kids (thank goodness, I can barely take care of myself right now)....but really, I wouldn't worry about it. I've only recently realized that my mother was dieting on and off the entire time I was living in my parent's house. Some of my favorite dishes were healthy: chili, baked chicken, healthy casseroles, etc. I can only think of maybe three times we fried anything in my house; hearing that people actually make fried chicken at home is totally foreign to me ;)

Besides that, all that really mattered once I didn't live at home was the fact that my mom cooked. She started Jenny Craig when I was about 15, which dramatically changed how my family ate. The fact that you're still cooking for your kids is going to matter more than being able to say you made the "best fried chicken".

DaughterOfVenus
09-03-2010, 10:27 PM
My kids are going to eat the same way I do. When I was a nanny, the girls used to ask for salad for dinner, because I would put bits of apples, chicken or tuna or sealegs in it, I'd make different homemade dressings, throw a few sunflower seeds sometimes, once in a while I'd make up some homemade croutons in a small bowl in the middle of the table, and the girls positively loved it! (never all these things at once, mind you! It was different every time.)

I used to make a fantastic fish soup that was very healthy, and the girls always talked about "Brenda's fish soup," much to their parents' chagrin, since their fish soup was creamy and fattening and very, very Norwegian. LOL

I think the trick is to get them while they're young. When I have my own kids, there will be no such thing as fried food coming from our kitchen. But I make some mean cheesy enchiladas (fat free cottage cheese, lowfat ricotta, tofu to make it go further, mexican blend) that are 250 calories for two enchiladas! I bet my future kids will love them.

Warm homemade tomato soup and grilled sandwiches on cold snowy days are one of my best childhood memories, and that's something I can pass on.

Being healthy means I have to be a smarter cook. It's not as easy and melting a stick of butter to add flavor, but it's doable, and I think I'll feel even better about feeding my kids, knowing I'm giving them not only wonderful, delicious, comforting food, but also good habits for life!

DaughterOfVenus
09-03-2010, 10:29 PM
Oh, I forgot to mention: What about a beautiful casserole dish of warm, roasty ratatouille and steamed short grain brown rice? Sounds like comfort food to me! :-)

Lori Bell
09-04-2010, 10:10 AM
Thanks Robin for the posting the recipes. I'll deffinately try them both!

RobinD
09-04-2010, 05:55 PM
Brenda, Would you be willing to share your fish soup and enchilada recipes?