General chatter - Pros and cons of rural living?




View Full Version : Pros and cons of rural living?


19Deltawifey
08-09-2010, 03:23 PM
Well I'm getting so tired of living in the suburbs but unfortunately since we are military this is our only option until we near retirement (13 years from now). We are definitely looking forward to that time when we can live on a couple of acres, and possibly raise our own chickens as well as goats, or just have a very small farm with a couple of animals. Unfortunately we aren't country people and lived in the suburbs most of our lives so of course this will be a change.

So basically to make a very long story short, I just wanted to know the pros and cons of living in a rural area? Also how hard is raising chickens and goats or sheep? When we can settle down and buy a house we are hoping to find a place with 3 or more acres, no more then 20 unless its for a good price.


winning the war
08-09-2010, 05:08 PM
I am a Coastie wife, and hubby is about 7 years from retirement. We live in rural Maine and grew up in suburban/uran environment. Living in a rural community offers peace and privacy. Depending on where you settle, you might also expect a lower crime rate. We've considered raising chickens, but we would need to build a heated pen for the winters. The air is fresher and community is closer. However, (again, depending on where you settle) it can be hard to fit in with families that have lived there for generations. And NOTHING is close! No 24 hour McDonalds (or 24 hour anything for that matter). Shopping and entertainment are no less than 25-30 minutes away. We also (like many rural Maine towns) have no police department. There are also more animals out here like deer, moose, skunks, porcupine, and such. All that said, we find rural living really suits us. Having everything somewhat far away keeps us from relying on fast food and all night convenience stores, and we really don't mind driving a little while for entertainment. Hope this helps!

Glory87
08-09-2010, 05:21 PM
Heh :) if you aren't a country person, you might want to tour a chicken coop to get an idea of the work involved. Chicken are messy messy poop filled machines and keeping a coop cleaned is a big job.

I grew up in rural NC and my mom currently lives on 5 acres outside of San Antonio. She currently has 2 donkeys and 3 goats, so I guess I can jump in about taking care of goats. They are pretty sturdy animals. Mom buys feed/hay for them and feeds them once a day. Although mom raised 2 of them from babies, they are not super friendly. There is also a strict hierarchy, and the head goat picks on the other goats.

Mom's house came with a chicken coop but she had no interest in raising chickens (see hugely messy, disgusting coop reasons above), so it was torn down. Mom got the goats to keep the shrub down on her 5 acres to help keep snakes away from the house. Wild dogs got into her property and killed 2 goats (in a rather spectacularly bloody fashion) so mom got a donkey to protect them (donkeys are very protective of their herd). Later, she got a miniature donkey because they are just so cute.

She pays a farrier to come out and check the donkeys shoes and everyone gets vet visits as needed.

As a thoroughly modern woman, my issues with rural living:

* Difficulties getting high speed internet access
* Complete lack of any decent restaurants (I'm a foodie and love great restaurants so this is a big one)
* Long drives to get basic stuff (takes 20 minutes just to get to a grocery store at mom's house, not TOO bad, but annoying if you just need to pick something up)
* No shopping - sure you can buy stuff online (if you can get a decent connection) but I like to try stuff on! When mom wants to hit a mall, it's a one hour trip to San Antonio
* Not a lot of fun stuff to do. I currently live in San Diego - zoos, museums, Sea World, restaurants, fantastic library system, Balboa park, beaches, amazing downtown...it's a tough comparison to the small town my mom lives in!
* School systems
* Small town nosiness - I guess because there is nothing else to do, everyone is SO UP in everyone else's business, makes me insane


mom4life
08-09-2010, 05:29 PM
I came from a small town and my mom moved my sister and I to the suburbs when I was 12. I always wanted that life back. So when dh and I got married I made sure he wanted the same thing, which was great because he did even though he was born a city boy.
We bought our home in rural TX. We don't live far from the city (pop 30,000) about 5 minutes away from everything. We have 2 1/2 acres, we have chickens (8) and goats (2). They've been easy to raise, we just got them this summer so we're still new to it all. We love our neighbors and the community we live in. Its very relaxing and quiet here.

caryesings
08-09-2010, 06:50 PM
I was raised in suburbs. First house in the city and saved like the devil to buy my country house, so I can compare it all:

Pros - I'm sure you have your own list of those. But here are a few that were mixed blessings for me:

Easy to stick to eating plan as no place to run out to for fast food or even a frozen pizza from the grocery store if after hours or Sunday.

Virtually no monthly utility bills. But you have to remember to run your own utilities, whether that's getting the propane tank refilled at jaw dropping cost, having the septic pumped out, etc. No high speed internet or cable bill cause you can't get those services.

Cons - Check zoning before you buy for what you want to do. Even rural areas are getting more and more regulations and I was pretty disappointed to find out I could not have a horse on my place despite the fact that place across the street had them.

Long haul for health care. Not a huge issue when I was younger, but as I got older it was a consideration.

The community members probably grew up together. Perfectly nice and welcoming to newcomer, but after 10 years I was still the new neighbor.

Rochester
08-09-2010, 09:20 PM
I guess it depends on your definition of rural. I live in the country, one mile from a town with a population of about 4,000. I have high speed internet, there's a 24-hour McDonald's and grocery in town, and I could have satellite TV if I wanted it.

I love the quiet and the lack of traffic. The town has a very 1950s/Mayberry atmosphere which is quaint and delightful. Everyone knows everyone, almost everyone is related, and there are NO secrets - and I like this. Many of the shops, restaurants, and businesses have been around for decades, and most are family owned. And there is virtually no crime and people are very respectful of the police force.

The main disadvantage is that a lot of things - entertainment, culture, high end restaurants, stores with a wide selection of items - are all far away, about 30 to 45 minutes. But it's not difficult to deal with. I just plan days to go to "the city" and do things like shop, go to museums or plays, and eat at a nice restaurant. It may seem somewhat inconvenient, but really it makes those things extra special rather than common and everyday.

Pink Pretty Daisy
08-09-2010, 09:31 PM
Pros: sitting on your porch watching the sunrise and set. Seas of green and golden wheat fields. Trees, birds, pheasants, and clean air. Peace with the world and a connection to nature and life. When it snows the beautiful white goes on for MILES. Untouched and shimmering in the sun - it takes your breath away. If you live above a valley, when the valley fogs over, you can sit and just admire the tops of the clouds. Community in a smaller town is amazing, farmers markets have the best produce and a grocery store, gas station and the internet for netflix is all you need....okay, now that I'm done missing my life...I can only think of two good reasons to live in the city - medical care and jobs.

museumchick
08-09-2010, 10:11 PM
As someone who was forced to live rural because of her job (and lack of car when I got the job), I've definitely noticed some pros and some definite cons.

Pros: Much less stressful
Closeness of community...once you are accepted
Beautiful scenery without buildings and lights in the way...stars at night are gorgeous out here!

Cons: Small town nosiness-everyone is related to everyone else and don't even bother trying to keep a secret; everyone will know it within a day
Shopping/dining options- there is a decent grocery store here, but if I need something at say a Walmart or Target I have to drive half an hour to get to one
General entertainment- no movie theaters, no bowling alleys, etc
Internet access- good luck getting anything other than dial-up

It just depends on how you can take it.

ANewCreation
08-10-2010, 12:29 AM
We chose rural living for about 10 years or so to raise our kids through their adolescence. We have no regrets. I loved the peace and quiet. I loved 'bumping into' the wildlife--ok, the skunks not so much--lol ;)

However, having said that.....here are a few cons I haven't seen mentioned:

Don't assume you can have any kind of farm animals. More and more neighborhoods are covenant protected, especially if you are looking at smaller acreage.

Not only will you have to drive a long distance to do anything you must take into consideration the winters. Rural areas often get snowed in, and unless you own your own plow it could be a day or two before you can get out of your own driveway. Sometimes the severe weather can knock down power lines and you must be prepared with supplies until you can get out to the store.

Utilities in rural areas (at least ours) are sometimes higher than being in the 'burbs.

There is a whole different culture that comes with rural living. Those that have been there all their lives are not always happy to see 'newcomers'.

If you have farm animals it makes it hard to be spontaneous or even take a vacation--unless you have friends/neighbors who are willing to watch them for you while you're gone.

Again, no regrets. Just a few things I wish I'd known before we moved out to our 5 acres (btw we were also in Colorado!). Our kids are grown and when we experienced 7 blizzards in as many weekends we said that was it. We're only going to get older and just couldn't see ourselves doing that in our advanced years. The winters wore us out. We live in a rural suburb now on an oversized lot and we couldn't be happier. It seems to be the best of both worlds for us.

I wish you well and commend you for educating yourself ahead of time.

Ciao
08-10-2010, 02:37 AM
http://i845.photobucket.com/albums/ab15/JeMappelleSierra/Photography/Divider-1-1.jpg

I've lived in a very country
area in Ohio for 3 years when
I was younger.

Pros: Blasting music! :lol: My
family loved turning up the music
and having no one around to complain.
And there was definitely lots of land!

Cons: Oh jeez. Long list.

-The crickets at night! I'm the type
of sleeper where I just HATE sound.
So in the country you'll hear tons of
crickets. Just in case that's a concern. :lol:

-DEER! When driving we almost ALWAYS
had our high beems on to avoid hitting
deer. On occasion, you'd find deer on the
side of the road that were hit.

-Lack of neighbors. The part of the country
where I lived had almost no kids near where
I lived. So as a child I had to bike almost 3
miles to my nearest friends house.

-Wasps, bugs, etc. It's very easy getting
wasps in a barn or flies in the house. Also,
if you have a pet then fleas are definitely
something to think about.

-Water/gas. We had to have tap water in the
house we lived in. And in the winter we had a
propane tank that was our only source of heat
and had to keep getting refilled (everyone around
us had this). Just something to consider.

-Lawn mowing. We had to have a motorized lawn-mower
because our land was so big. And it was just something
you COULD NOT leave alone. You'll get bitten by ticks if
you do.

All-in-all, some of these things may seem petty,
but it's just things for you to think about.

EDIT: Where I lived in the country, there was no
McDonalds, no walmart, no krogers, nothing. It
was small little shops and businesses and if you wanted
all that stuff then you had to drive an hour to the
nearest bigger city. Like Rochester said, it depends
on how rural you're talking about.

http://i845.photobucket.com/albums/ab15/JeMappelleSierra/Photography/Divider-1.jpg

19Deltawifey
08-10-2010, 01:26 PM
We chose rural living for about 10 years or so to raise our kids through their adolescence. We have no regrets. I loved the peace and quiet. I loved 'bumping into' the wildlife--ok, the skunks not so much--lol ;)

However, having said that.....here are a few cons I haven't seen mentioned:

Don't assume you can have any kind of farm animals. More and more neighborhoods are covenant protected, especially if you are looking at smaller acreage.

Not only will you have to drive a long distance to do anything you must take into consideration the winters. Rural areas often get snowed in, and unless you own your own plow it could be a day or two before you can get out of your own driveway. Sometimes the severe weather can knock down power lines and you must be prepared with supplies until you can get out to the store.

Utilities in rural areas (at least ours) are sometimes higher than being in the 'burbs.

There is a whole different culture that comes with rural living. Those that have been there all their lives are not always happy to see 'newcomers'.

If you have farm animals it makes it hard to be spontaneous or even take a vacation--unless you have friends/neighbors who are willing to watch them for you while you're gone.

Again, no regrets. Just a few things I wish I'd known before we moved out to our 5 acres (btw we were also in Colorado!). Our kids are grown and when we experienced 7 blizzards in as many weekends we said that was it. We're only going to get older and just couldn't see ourselves doing that in our advanced years. The winters wore us out. We live in a rural suburb now on an oversized lot and we couldn't be happier. It seems to be the best of both worlds for us.

I wish you well and commend you for educating yourself ahead of time.

Thats so funny that you mentioned skunks because I CAN'T smell skunks lol. We can drive right past the skunk carcass and people in the car will be gagging but me I can't smell it at all but I can smell everything else just fine. Also what part of Colorado did you live in when you had to deal with the blizzards? This will be our first winter here, we are in Colorado Springs. We are from Maryland though and plan to live. I do get a little sad sometimes because by the time my husband has 20 years in the Army our oldest child will be turning 20 and our youngest will be 17. I just wish that we could give our kids a normal life, where we could live in 1 house and they can make life long friends without constantly bouncing around the USA. Of course it's nice to travel but I just hate how their is nothing stable in their lives besides me and my husband.

So what do people do when the power goes out when they live in a rural area? Do you have a back up generator?

19Deltawifey
08-10-2010, 01:33 PM
http://i845.photobucket.com/albums/ab15/JeMappelleSierra/Photography/Divider-1-1.jpg

[COLOR="Red"]

-Lawn mowing. We had to have a motorized lawn-mower
because our land was so big. And it was just something
you COULD NOT leave alone. You'll get bitten by ticks if
you do.


http://i845.photobucket.com/albums/ab15/JeMappelleSierra/Photography/Divider-1.jpg

TICKS!!!! Ah I hate ticks with a passion, crickets don't bother me because I sleep with a fan on and it blocks my husbands snoring so I'm sure I wont hear the crickets :) Also when you say motorized lawn mower, do you mean the large industrial size lawn mower?

caryesings
08-10-2010, 02:43 PM
So what do people do when the power goes out when they live in a rural area? Do you have a back up generator?

Wow, I had forgotten about the power outages because that was just a given a few times a year. Always had water in jugs on hand because with no electicity, no well pump. Wood stove to heat the house and to cook on. Candles and flashlight (including a head lamp to read). If it was summer, pack up the fridge and freezer contents and drive them to the city to use friends or family's cold storage.

drake3272004
08-10-2010, 06:28 PM
We moved to the country 2 years ago and will never live in a city again! :carrot:

Right now we are just renting a farm house until we can get our own place. Rent is much cheaper.

We have satellite for tv and internet, much cheaper than what we paid for cable. We recycle just about everything, hauling it ourselves to recycle center (nearest town is 7 miles away and nearest city is about 40 miles away)and we compost....so we don't have to pay much for waste removal. We don't have farm animals, the barn had to be taken down and we prefer to wait til we have our own place. We do however have a HUGE veggie garden.

We have about 5 acres that we care for around the house, that gets to be a bit much for mowing and big snowfalls in winter can be a pain but well worth it. The house has ripple heat, we are on electricity for most part but if grid is overloaded we get rippled to propane.

I like that we don't have instant access to fast food and we are more organized with our meal planning. I love the peace and quiet, I love the wildlife and I love that we can crank up the surround sound when we want :)

My kids go to school in the town 7 miles away, and there is an air base near by...so the neighbors are a bit more accepting. There are people who have lived here FORever, but there are also quite a few that are new to the area too.

The biggest con for me is I do have to commute a bit to get to my job and that gets to be hairy in the winter. Otherwise...I am loving it. And I had never lived in the country before.

Martina
08-10-2010, 07:42 PM
con: everything!!!

I was born and raised in Atlanta, Georgia and came in in 2007 after my Mom died. I was invited by my ex-boyfriend/best friend and his mother. I really like my friend and a couple of his friends, so thats a definite plus. However, this area is really different from most rural areas.

I don't know, everything is just different. People here are really mean to animals, for one thing. Some even go out of their way to run over them in their trucks. Many people here call their daughters the same name they have for their vaginas-- they call both of them "cootahs" I don't know-- I think that is weird, and disrespectful. They don't call their sons penises.

Its just different than what I am used to. Plus, I miss traffic, and roads with actual roadsigns, and driveways made of concrete. I just miss the city. I love the city.

ANewCreation
08-10-2010, 09:09 PM
I think that is so cool you can't smell skunks. My dogs got sprayed not once but twice and I can't tell you how miserable we all were!

We lived out east of Colorado Springs, North of Falcon, not quite in Elbert. Now, of course, that area is built up and the trek to grocery store would be under 15 minutes.

Most folks did not have generators, although we thought about getting one we never did. You just knew you could count on the power going out once or twice a year and prepared for it in advance. Storing bottled water, hand sanitizer, paper goods, open and eat type of foods was something I did every fall--what didn't get used, the guys used when they went camping in the spring/summer.

We did have a gas stove and a wood burning stove (that wasn't planned on our part, the former owners did this) so cooking and staying warm (at least downstairs) was never a problem. But, like careysings said, pumps operate on electricity so no water is a big pain. I'd rather do without heat than do without water--yuck! Can you imagine not bathing for days???? Baby wipes and hand sanitizer will carry you only so far.... :(

Here's the really weird thing about power outages (at least in our old area)--everyone seemed to be on a different line, I guess because some houses were newer than others. So my house might be out of power for two days and the neighbor behind me might be out for 4 days. So, we all tended to look out for one another. She cooked food at my house and they all did their bathing at my house, once my power was back on. I know one year, a neighboring town was out of power for close to a week, but the good news was, the streets were cleared long before the power was back on and people could at least go to friends for bathing, etc.

BTW, can I just thank you and your family for serving our country? Thank you for the sacrifices you and your children make, as well as your husband. We live in a neighborhood heavy with military and they are the finest neighbors we could ask for so we see and appreciate our military!

Serbrider
08-11-2010, 04:12 AM
I've lived everywhere. In the city, in the suburbs, and now I'm moving out to the country with my Grandparents (who have 40+ acres in Central Texas).

Pros:
Peace and Quiet
The ability to have farm animals (where we are at least)
Wildlife (LOTS of deer)
Since you don't have many neighbors, you get to know them
Small town atmosphere is awesome... for me at least.

Cons:
Internet (we have 200mb a day... so I'll be heading to the library for all of my school stuff)
Ticks and Chiggers... nasty creatures.
Having to mow and care for the 5-10 acres that the house lot is on (the rest is left to grow however it wants, but small trees are torn up and poison ivy is killed)
You're in the middle of nowhere.
The grocery store is 35 minutes away.
School is 15 minutes away.
And... even though you KNOW your neighbors... you hardly ever see them... since there are so few... and half of them just have their place as a "summer" or "weekend" home, and don't really live there.


In the end... I love the country. I love being able to get my hands dirty... but as long as I can clean them back off again. ;) I love country boys... and the country life. Very relaxed and laid-back... and it's so funny to hear the gossip... of how the whole town is freaking about because one neighbor took her trash out at 3PM instead of 9AM like usual. :p (no joke)

junebug41
08-11-2010, 11:23 AM
I grew up in rural Colorado (western slope) :)

FANTASTIC upbringing. Couldn't have asked for a better place to be raised.

Some observations:
-Be prepared to pay a premium for everything.
-People have their tight-knit community and you may be seen as an intruder on that. Once you're in though, you're in. This may be a mountain town thing though, I don't know.
-The winters will be much, much harder than you ever imagined. We lived outside of town (up in the hills) and to get around may require creativity and guts. But folks are better prepared for the rougher winters I think.
-To some people, the city conveniences are a really big deal so make sure you are ok with not having them. It took us years to get a Target and when we finally did it was still expensive. I had to drive 3 hours to Denver for a prom dress. We would have to go school clothes shopping an hour and a half away. We have a Costco that's about 30 miles away now, which isn't too bad (only during the winter is it iffy).

It may not seem like a big deal until you don't have it.

But it's quiet and peaceful and slow. I spent my summers outdoors on the river and running around in the sticks. I live in the 'burbs now and wonder if my own kids will have that luxury (sad that is a "luxury").

I would move back in a heartbeat.

nelie
08-11-2010, 11:42 AM
My inlaws live out in the country.

- They have a well and they have to treat the water
- They have one of those sewage things in the ground, that has to be treated (and I think emptied ever so often)
- They don't have any high speed internet and use dial up
- The have a huge yard which they have to mow although some of the yard is trees
- They have ticks and my father in law was just diagnosed with lyme disease
- It takes 20-30 minutes to drive to any store or anything
- They have few restaurants available to them and the ones they do have aren't very good (Applebees, etc)
- They take their trash to the dump
- They are responsible for clearing their driveway and lane for snow removal. Luckily one of their neighbors has a snow removal thing but otherwise they'd have to pay directly for someone to do it or do it themselves. Which means if a snow storm happens, they get stuck for days.
- If the power goes out, they just wait for it to get fixed and could take a couple days
- They get excited about such things as the firestation pancake breakfast which is also a big social event for people
- Their town is actually getting some stores because the suburbs are expanding into their area but really the choices of stores aren't that great and they have to drive further away to go shopping.
- Some of their neighbors are downright hicks and don't care about animals such as they will tie their animals up outside/leave the animals outside.
- Country roads are rarely lighted so its often dark at night and often animals get hit on the road

They like living there, personally, I'd never want to live in the country

junebug41
08-11-2010, 11:51 AM
- Country roads are rarely lighted so its often dark at night and often animals get hit on the road

That's a good one, and also a subtle difference. You do get a whole new appreciation for street lights. I nearly mowed down a mountain lion in high school and have taken out my fair share of cats, raccoons, deer, etc... it's just a reality.

nelie
08-11-2010, 11:59 AM
That's a good one, and also a subtle difference. You do get a whole new appreciation for street lights. I nearly mowed down a mountain lion in high school and have taken out my fair share of cats, raccoons, deer, etc... it's just a reality.

Yeah and not only that, roads are often narrower so I've seen a variety of things on the road including deer and what not but you often see them on the side of the road first when you live in a place that has sidewalks/bigger roads. With country roads, it seems like you don't see the animal and then all of a sudden, the animal is in the middle of the road.

jenjen
08-11-2010, 12:20 PM
I grew up in a small TX town (3,500 people) and my parents still live there. We live in town, but my dad has a farm about 10 minutes away in the country. So, snow isn't an issue, but the heat is!


Pros
The schools are really good---know the teachers, principal & superintendant. We know our neighbors & most of them have been there for 20+ years. It's nice to know that there is someone looking out for you. Dad has cable internet, so that's not a problem. Even has a wireless router so when my brother & I come home we can use our laptops. We have a Wal-Mart and one grocery store.
There's some sort of meal almost every night of the week to raise money for a group---whether it's the volunteer fire dept, high school class, etc.
It's a much slower pace.


Cons

We have to go about 30 minutes to find a Super-Walmart or better grocery store.
For clothes, we have to go to the city which is an hour away. We have Beall's but that's about it.
The choice of restaurants is pretty poor. We have fast food restaurants, and a few family owned, but not a really nice restaurant when you want to do something special.
EVERYONE knows your business within about 20 minutes of it happening!
The job market can be tough.
Healthcare can be tough. We are lucky enough to have awesome doctors and a new hospital, but that isn't the case with a lot of rural communities.

All in all, I love it. And, I'm trying to find my way back soon. The drive to the city doesn't bother me because it's usually open roads and I'm used to trying to get through Houston in under an hour!

Ciao
08-11-2010, 02:29 PM
TICKS!!!! Ah I hate ticks with a passion, crickets don't bother me because I sleep with a fan on and it blocks my husbands snoring so I'm sure I wont hear the crickets :) Also when you say motorized lawn mower, do you mean the large industrial size lawn mower?
http://i845.photobucket.com/albums/ab15/JeMappelleSierra/Photography/Divider-1-1.jpg

For us, a John Deere lawn
mower worked perfectly. :)
It doesn't have to be over the top,
but I would not recommend a
push mower.

Wikipedia Image of LM (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f4/John_Deere_lawn_mower.JPG)

http://i845.photobucket.com/albums/ab15/JeMappelleSierra/Photography/Divider-1.jpg

jules1216
08-13-2010, 08:37 AM
pros---peace and quiet, safe enviroment for the kids and now grandkids, pathways in my woods for walking, running & tractor rides,I don't mind the 20 minute drive to a grocery store keeps me on plan, plenty of nice restaurants within a 30 to 60 minute drive which makes it all the more special when hubby and I take the time to go out by ourselves, lower crime rate, I have high speed internet so thats not a problem, I can have all the animals I want on my unrestricted acerage, people are friendly and helpful and don't walk right past someone who needs help

and I don't mind the lack of street lights cause it makes the stars in the sky that much clearer....


con--plowing snow in the winter of my 600 plus driveway...only to find the one mile stretch of road to get to the snow emergency route has not been touched, which sometimes turns out to be a pro cause I can call into work and stay home and enjoy the snow and my woodstove!! I have never lost power more than a few hours or have been completely snowed in for more than two days.

MindiV
08-13-2010, 08:54 AM
The drive to the city doesn't bother me because it's usually open roads and I'm used to trying to get through Houston in under an hour!


I'm a country girl, born and raised. Lived in a city for a while and hated it - the traffic, the crime, the crowded atmosphere. Couldn't WAIT to get away.

I always hear people complain about this very thing - it takes SO long or is SO far to the nearest Walmart or big store. For me it's 40 miles north or 30 miles southeast. But my husband lived in Houston a while (he also hated it) and said the nearest Walmart was CLOSER in miles, but took just as long to get to as either of the big stores we go to now. So it's really not any different at all.

mom4life
08-13-2010, 12:32 PM
everyone reminded me on the con's of living out in the country.
Yes we have a propane tank and it can be costly to fill during the winter months....last year it was from Nov-March. We filled it 3-4 times because it got so cold. Normally it was only twice.
Since we live 3 miles outside the city line, our water comes from a private source of well water. Which I have no complaints about. :)
Trash is also from a private source as well.
It does feel like rural folks are like step-children to suburb peeps. We have to get all our utilities from private sources. We do get Cable and DSL where we're at. Though we have a crummy time finding help if we need someone to pick up a dead or stray animal out here. We get the huge run around of "Oh you gotta call so and so for that in your area." 5 calls later and we have a winner. We had a possum come into our yard...being the city folks we are, we called animal control. Being where we live, they told us it was our job to take care of it...they didn't care if we bought a trap on our own and brought it in or if we decided to shoot it...we were on our own.
Cool thing about being the step-child is that at this point (unlike our suburb neighbors) we can launch our own fireworks for the 4th of July and no one can say anything unless some foolio starts a fire or something, luckily that hasn't happened. City folks can't do that...they have to buy the sparklers and fountains. LOL
As for the farm animals, someone here brought up an interesting point that I didn't think about...which was not being able to take a long vacation if we wanted unless we have someone to take care of them. Which if the time did come for that I'm sure one of our neighbors would help us. :)

My all time biggest....hugest complaint since living here are the fricken Chiggers. Oh heck, I hate going out into our yard. I'm a chigger magnet. We found that spreading Sulfur on our legs and shoes before stepping foot on our lawn will keep them away. Yes you'll smell like rotten eggs but at least you won't be itching later. :(

mom4life
08-13-2010, 12:37 PM
I'm a country girl, born and raised. Lived in a city for a while and hated it - the traffic, the crime, the crowded atmosphere. Couldn't WAIT to get away.

I always hear people complain about this very thing - it takes SO long or is SO far to the nearest Walmart or big store. For me it's 40 miles north or 30 miles southeast. But my husband lived in Houston a while (he also hated it) and said the nearest Walmart was CLOSER in miles, but took just as long to get to as either of the big stores we go to now. So it's really not any different at all.

hahaha We lived in SoCal for years and it never bothered me to deal with traffic to get from LA to the OC for a pair of shoes, which would take an hour or two depending on where the stores were located. And that's hitting 3-4 different Ross Stores for the right size. ;)
I've lived here in North TX for 3 years and for some reason I'll complain about driving from one end of our town to the other....which only takes 15 minutes to do but I have no issues driving to Dallas which takes 45 minutes to an hour to drive with zero traffic......go figure. LOL

eroica27
08-13-2010, 01:11 PM
My all time biggest....hugest complaint since living here are the fricken Chiggers. Oh heck, I hate going out into our yard. I'm a chigger magnet. We found that spreading Sulfur on our legs and shoes before stepping foot on our lawn will keep them away. Yes you'll smell like rotten eggs but at least you won't be itching later. :(

I did trail work for a time and discovered that chiggers (and fire ants) do not like the taste of petroleum jelly(vasaline). sure its sticky and weird to put on, but i found it to be more effective that sulfur-and it doesn't stink. as for dealing with fire ants they take one bite, are like wtf? and abandon the area.

mom4life
08-13-2010, 04:49 PM
I did trail work for a time and discovered that chiggers (and fire ants) do not like the taste of petroleum jelly(vasaline). sure its sticky and weird to put on, but i found it to be more effective that sulfur-and it doesn't stink. as for dealing with fire ants they take one bite, are like wtf? and abandon the area.
WOW! so just apply some on your ankles and they leave you alone? I would so love this approach over the sulfur. :)
Using bug repellant everytime you go out ends up being costly too.

eroica27
08-14-2010, 10:40 AM
bug repellant wasn't effective for me. for best results i would also put some on your waist as well.

nelie
08-15-2010, 09:53 AM
mom4life - I think the stepchildren feeling really isn't that those in the country are looked at as less important but really it all comes to money. If you live is a place with a denser population than your tax dollars can pay for a lot more services than if you live in a sparsely populated area. You also can't expect those services to extend to you if you aren't in the pool that pays for those services.

OF course I think everyone needs to find what is right for them. I live 20 miles out of DC, in a fairly dense populated area but I live right off a large state park with a large lake. We are able to walk our dogs among miles of maintained paths and hiking trails, kayak in the lake and we also have a variety of services available to us and quite a few stores within a few miles. It takes me 10 minutes to get to work on side roads and generally I have little to no traffic unless there is a severe accident on the freeway, then the side roads get somewhat congested.

Personally, I love where I live and if I lived any further out, I think that would be too far for me.

gonnadoitthistime
08-15-2010, 04:18 PM
First off, a couple of acres is not much land. Second, a lot depends on what part of the country you are in. In rural KY there are some shockingly backwards (racist, sexist etc) views, corrupt local governments, lots of meth, church attending hypocrites, small town "royalty" attitude, and everyone is related or connected in some way. Do lots of research before buying land, and be aware as an "outsider" you can get ripped off and jerked around by repair people, utilities etc. But the countryside is beautiful!

19Deltawifey
08-16-2010, 11:23 AM
Thats what I worry about also is buying a house on a couple of acres and living around racist. I'm black, cuban, and native american so I'm pretty sure that I will stand out, and possibly have a harder time fitting in. I'm friends with lots of different races so I'm hoping to find a diverse country town where everyone gets along and race isn't the issue of why they don't get along. That might of made sense idk. We will probably settle down in Maryland around a area where I grew up, that is diverse and race isn't a issue, and plus there is lots of land which is good.