Weight Loss Support - I was doing so well but lately...




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seabiscuit
05-16-2010, 08:43 PM
Hi Chickies...

I was doing great! I was eating really healthily and exercising a lot, but lately I have been getting into junk food and today I binged :(

I don't know what is happening! All I can think of is that when I was doing well I was happier, and now I am reacting to more stress and acting on wants and desires.

I am really upset about this. I am meeting with my trainer tomorrow who I usually weigh in with and I asked him to not bring the scale. It's hard for me to exercise a whole lot because of my knee but I am getting that checked out soon...

I just want to get back on track...


juliastl27
05-16-2010, 08:49 PM
just let it go and get back on track. the real mistake would be quitting for good!! stop thinking about it and get back on plan. not tomorrow, or the next day, but right NOW!

angelskeep
05-16-2010, 08:56 PM
Don't give up! Get back on your plan and figure out what went wrong and how to handle it better next time. You can do it...but NOT if you just give up!

I was on plan all week, and I GAINED 2 lbs. And I am not giving up, so you can't either!

Barb


Cglasscock1
05-17-2010, 12:02 AM
You said that you felt so good when you were eating right and exercising.
You will feel good again when you get back on track so just forget about the lapses and get yourself going again. You can do it!

xMeaganx
05-17-2010, 01:14 AM
Well I completely understand. I binged and had junk food all last week. It would have been easy for me just to give in and continue on eating these food with no stopping or care in the world, but they made me sick. These food were not healthy and my body wasn't able to handle them properly. I looked at my habits and thought that I could keep going on my downward spiral, or I could get serious and do something about it.....I did something about it. You realize what you are doing and know you need to stop, and that is a big step! Now make the decision to move away from those types of foods.

Shmead
05-17-2010, 07:34 AM
I think reflection--serious reflection--is the best way to deal with these sorts of problems. When does eating off plan become inevitable? When is the real moment of choice for you? Figure out where the avalanche starts, and change your behavior there. Don't just hope that next time you'll have the willpower to stop the avalanche at the bottom of the mountain. That's much, much harder.

TXMary2
05-17-2010, 08:47 AM
Don't give up. You made a bad choice - that's all! Now forgive yourself and move on. You are doing great- 17 pounds down is awesome!!!

motivated chickie
05-17-2010, 09:24 AM
You're not alone. I just emerged from a 4 day bout of bingeing. It was horrible and I couldn't stop. But while I was doing it, I knew I don't want this life anymore.

Yesterday, I had my first clean day. I went for a 4 mile run and my stomach hurt most of the time, but I kept going. I ate a healthy lunch with extra vegetables and then started thinking about the convenience store. Since I couldn't concentrate on my housework, I took a 4 mile walk and visited a friend. Then I went home, ate dinner & thought about bingeing. Instead I went to bed early.

I had to keep moving all day yesterday to keep myself out of the food.

I think the worst part of this is the mental obsession with food. Wherever I go I have thoughts of buying candy and chips. Since there are opportunities to binge everywhere, I turn up my iPod and walk faster away from the food stores.

I don't have any answers for you except to say that binges lead nowhere except to more binges. There has to be a better way for all of us.

jennyplain
05-17-2010, 09:52 AM
For me, I had a major breakthrough with my therapist about why I eat and why I binge. It all has to do with resentment - if I'm resentful about something or towards someone, I deal with it by rewarding myself with food, which in turn is actually a punishment for me, in the long run.

Now, this is just my issue. However, realizing it makes me a lot more likely to stop myself before I binge. I put the brakes on, think about why I'm upset and what I'm eating, and then can usually talk myself out of it.

Understanding WHY is really important, because otherwise it is like putting a band-aid on an infected wound. It might temporarily hide the problem, but it's only getting worse underneath.

saef
05-17-2010, 10:38 AM
In my experience, dealing with this problem requires both self-searching and changing your behaviors.

The self-searching means not just asking yourself why you're bingeing -- you already know that, and you've said it's due to stress. It also means asking yourself, at the moment you feel like bingeing, why it's happening at that very moment, and not at another. You may have to sit with yourself & try to identify what exactly you are feeling, other than a generalized "bad." And then ask yourself if eating something really will help, other than just for a few minutes, and whether that is worth the remorse & being hard on yourself afterward.

And then there is the behavioral side. Which may mean making rules. Like no driving out on excursions for food except for formal trips to the grocery store. Or no eating in your car. Or setting a timer & making yourself wait a half hour before eating. Or posting here. Or calling up someone. Just like MotivatedChickie describes, sometimes you just have to white-knuckle it through, even though the sirens keep singing & singing to you. Have you ever seen a movie in which someone is sweating out a withdrawal from morphine or heroin? Sometimes it's almost like that. I mean, not to minimize what people go through in physical withdrawal, because those addictions are serious, but it may put you through unpleasant territory, in terrible mental discomfort, and you may feel like a tantruming child. But that's what it takes sometimes to get through it. You won't die from not getting your junk food. Really, you won't. Nobody ever died yet from not getting a junk food fix -- that I know of.

[Imagining a headstone: Here Lies Saef, For Lack of a Pecan Praline] Not likely.

ncuneo
05-17-2010, 11:44 AM
A few weeks ago after months of being on plan and binge free and craving free I broke down. I have no clue what caused it but I had two weekends in a row of moderate to bad bingeing. Then it passed. Other than a few stress issues I'm currently in the middle of right now the desire/*need* to binge just went away. This has been an issue the entire four years I've been doing this, but I always come back to what I know I have to do to lose this weight and make it permanent. My point is that you just have to hang in there and always try to start again the very next meal. Just because you made a mistake doesn't mean it's over. It's a constant process and honestly it probably always will be.

waiting2exhale
05-17-2010, 12:12 PM
i had a week of binging too and i hate it too! I went up 4 pounds from it! Arg! but i need to kick myself in the but and keep going!

ubergirl
05-17-2010, 12:50 PM
In my experience, dealing with this problem requires both self-searching and changing your behaviors.

The self-searching means not just asking yourself why you're bingeing -- you already know that, and you've said it's due to stress. It also means asking yourself, at the moment you feel like bingeing, why it's happening at that very moment, and not at another. You may have to sit with yourself & try to identify what exactly you are feeling, other than a generalized "bad." And then ask yourself if eating something really will help, other than just for a few minutes, and whether that is worth the remorse & being hard on yourself afterward.

And then there is the behavioral side. Which may mean making rules. Like no driving out on excursions for food except for formal trips to the grocery store. Or no eating in your car. Or setting a timer & making yourself wait a half hour before eating. Or posting here. Or calling up someone. Just like MotivatedChickie describes, sometimes you just have to white-knuckle it through, even though the sirens keep singing & singing to you. Have you ever seen a movie in which someone is sweating out a withdrawal from morphine or heroin? Sometimes it's almost like that. I mean, not to minimize what people go through in physical withdrawal, because those addictions are serious, but it may put you through unpleasant territory, in terrible mental discomfort, and you may feel like a tantruming child. But that's what it takes sometimes to get through it. You won't die from not getting your junk food. Really, you won't. Nobody ever died yet from not getting a junk food fix -- that I know of.

[Imagining a headstone: Here Lies Saef, For Lack of a Pecan Praline] Not likely.

Listen to Saef, as she is very wise....

Just adding my .02...

Man, I was such a bad binger!!! I could binge on literally almost anything. Cake decorating sprinkles....? Been there done that. I've EATEN sugar cubes and powdered sugar straight from the bag. The worst I ever remember is when I was doing Jenny Craig after the birth of my first child, and after ten days on Jenny Craig, I craved my baby's rice cereal so badly that I went off Jenny Craig by eating an entire box of Gerber's rice cereal mixed with sugar and half and half. WTF???? I mean, really!!! That stuff takes like ground up cardboard-- but at the time, it was manna from heaven to bingeing me.

I felt like an addict because of the intensity of my cravings. I acted like an addict by the way I lied and sneaked around.

But here's the thing I finally learned. And I freaking wish it hadn't taken me almost 30 straight years of bingeing to figure it out: with bingeing, we are not really addicted to a substance, like a drug addict, we are addicted to a behavior. For me, it was A LOT more similar to OCD than to being a drug addict....

FOR ME (and this is not true for everyone) the "why" really did not matter at all. What I needed was to break the cycle of the behavior-- the compulsion. Because really, there were a million reasons, but at the same time, there was NO reason.

It is extremely difficult to move past a compulsive behavior-- especially one that is really entrenched. However, the really and truly strange thing for me was to discover how little hold those food actually had over me once I was finally able to break through the compulsive behavior.

Now, I can keep stuff I shouldn't eat IN MY HOUSE and not even think about it.

But, here's the thing. I've ALWAYS been able to keep food I shouldn't eat in my house and not touch it-- like if I baked cupcakes for my kids' school, I could leave them sitting on the counter and not eat them, because they "weren't mine..." or if somebody gave my hubby a box of chocolates that he was eating one by one, or if I bought something to give to someone else... I always DID have the power to restrain myself if I thought the foods were not mine. The trick was just to realize that I could apply that same control to all binge foods.

We are all different, and many people do seem to find that reflecting on the "why" is helpful, but in my own experience, focusing on the behavior itself was the only thing that really gave me lasting results.

bnorah
05-17-2010, 01:22 PM
I want to let you in on something I follow. I watch The Biggest Loser show religiously, and I'm learning so much from watching these players battle it out for a chance at a new life. One of my favorite motivational posters from the show is "Get up and finish what you started." I've had to keep this mindset for me personally or else I will be doomed to have another failure. Setbacks will happen, but you can't let them get in your way. Just push them over and keep going! Best of luck to you.

seabiscuit
05-19-2010, 11:45 AM
thanks so much everyone...

I am feeling more motivated.

Liliann
05-19-2010, 01:18 PM
Hang in there... Each day is a new beginning! Stay strong and keep thinking positive..You can do it!!:hug:

seabiscuit
05-19-2010, 03:42 PM
Thank You!