Weight Loss Support - Anybody else here never feel full?




ninepaw
05-04-2010, 03:31 AM
It seems like a strange sort of issue, but surely I can't be the only one...?

No matter what, when I eat, I never feel full. Which isn't to say that I feel hungry constantly, that isn't the case at all. But I can eat a meal, and not feel full at the end... Regardless of how much I eat. A lot of times this leads to me eating more than I should, and I really hate that. Obviously I'm working on training myself to just stop eating, but it's not always the easiest thing ever. Today, for example, was a bad eating day for me. I went shopping with my friend, and we went to Chipotle for an early dinner. I ate most of my burrito bowl, stopped eating, whatever. Then my other friends invited me to the lake, and I went, and they were barbecuing. And I ate a couple hot dogs. And a small strip of chicken.

There was no reason for me to eat at the lake other than the fact that I've been craving barbecue(my own fault, to be sure). I was absolutely not hungry. But the issue I have is that even after eating that on top of the burrito bowl... I didn't feel full or anything. Just... Not hungry.

I don't know, maybe I'm weird. But it kind of bothers me, because it's so easy to slip on something so stupid. We get used to eating until we feel full... But what does one do when that feeling doesn't happen?


Cherry in STL
05-04-2010, 03:45 AM
I know exactly what you are talking about. I have to eat an insane amount of food to get that full feeling. I don't know if my stomach is stretched way out or something, or if it's a psychological thing.

jlady
05-04-2010, 04:30 AM
do some investigation into when and how much you consume to feel full. my issue was gaining steadily over the years; that's a direct result of eating too much. through calorie counting, i've learned (um.. still learning, old habits are hard to break said the chinese buffet) the correct amount of food i need to fuel my body. i've also learned that the "full feeling" i always craved was actually the feeling of over-doing it.
by not feeling full does that mean you feel hungry? or just not full?

when i was first learning and i though i was still hungry, i would stop and drink water, with the intent of waiting 15 minutes to see if my body needed more. never did bc often times i would be off doing something else and no longer be in eating mode. good luck figuring this out. i'm sure more folks will respond tomorrow morning.


giselley
05-04-2010, 04:45 AM
I am glad you made that second post. What I have researched is that a human being does not need to totally gorge so that all her stomach is full-- way too much food. I have also learned that a tiny cube of cheese or "food" will stop your cravings for many hours. Over-eating has been one of my biggest problems, and major cause of my overweight. I would make a whole crock-pot of stew or something and eat half of it at a meal when I should have only eaten a cup or cup and a half of the stuff. (measuring cup). Eating by volume is one of the most important lessons I have had to learn. I still fill up a measuring cup and then put it on my plate. Someone (wise) out there said that you should eat no more per meal than the size of your fist. That is about how much your stomach will hold. That is about 1 hot dog-- That is a lot less than what people usually get on their plate! Anyway, I eat by size of meal, not calories. It takes discipline too, because you have to shrink your stomach-- and that is uncomfortable as you are doing it.

Also, I read before that the weight of the food can cause the stomach's hunger signals to turn off. If you eat "heavy" food, like beans you will feel full.

Belease
05-04-2010, 07:23 AM
I am totally the same. My thin friends can look at a piece of cake or whatever after they've had a meal and just not want to eat it. I can really eat anything whenever, no matter how much I've already eaten. Unless I'm going out for a meal and have all three courses, I don't feel like I'm FULL, but since dieting I've recognised that feeling isn't a positive one, really. I don't know about you, but my idea of full is actually my stomach not having any more room whatsoever to fit food - that's not the right way to eat!

I saw an interesting programme with this in it - they had a bunch of little kids and gave them lunch. Then they asked them how full they were, and most of them pointed to the diagram of the person whose stomach was full of food. Then, they started the kids off drawing and gave them a plate of party food. It was really interesting to see that some of the kids just left the food, because they didn't want it because they were full. Some had one or two pieces. Some just sat there mindlessly cramming piece after piece into their mouths until they had eaten the whole plate-full. I can categorically state that I would have been the kid with nothing left on my plate at the end. There's just something about my brain that doesn't seem to feel there's any connection between having already had food, and eating more. At times I honestly used to make myself feel ill from eating too much. But since I started controlling my calories, I've not felt that in a long time, and I really really like it!

Shmead
05-04-2010, 08:15 AM
I am totally the same. My thin friends can look at a piece of cake or whatever after they've had a meal and just not want to eat it. I can really eat anything whenever, no matter how much I've already eaten.

I feel much the same way, and used to be amazed when someone would turn down cake, say, and and explain "I had a big lunch and I am full". I would think "Who's too full for a delicious cupcake? I don't even understand that". Then, one day, I realized that they are lying. At least a lot of them are. "I'm full" is a polite social lie for "I can't eat that" because many, many thin people consciously regulate their intake, which is why they are thin. They could eat, and enjoy, the cupcake, but they had a big lunch so they don't think they should.

This sounds so dumb when I type it out, but it was just a social signal I missed. I thought everyone was wired profoundly differently than I, but I am now coming to suspect that in many cases it is not that simple.

motivated chickie
05-04-2010, 10:13 AM
I think there is a difference between feeling full and being satisfied. I have a binge eating problem & when I would binge, I'd eat until I was in pain. I would have trouble breathing because I was so full of food, but I was never satisfied.

I guess my stomach has shrunk because I do feel full now sometimes on a little bit of food. But I still don't have the satisfied feeling. Well, actually I feel quite satisfied when I can get up from the table and walk away from the food.

rockinrobin
05-04-2010, 10:29 AM
Back in the day I ate till I was INCOMFORTABLY full. Now, I eat till I am satisfied. Not full, but not hungry.

And to tell you the truth, I most definitely COULD eat more, I feel as if there's room for it - but, and this is a biggie - I don't rely on how I FEEL - I rely on my calorie allotment. I have a pre-determined amount of food that I eat at one sitting - when it's gone - THAT is what determines when I stop eating.

Beverlyjoy
05-04-2010, 10:45 AM
Seems like forever that 'feeling full' part of me was broken. I still have trouble. I did, however, learn something in a mindful eating class that helps. Try this: when you take a bite of food follow that food down your esophagas and into your tummy. Really try to feel the food down there. (sometimes I'll close my eyes.) Do it again and again. After you do it many times - you will begin to feel a kind of fullness. Or, at least that the food is down in your stomach. It really takes alot of practice - but, I never thought it was possible to feel any fullness at all.

Do I do this on a regular basis - no - not often enough. But, sometimes, I'll do it to remind myself that I can.

I realize this sounds kind of silly.

Of course...I certainly don't rely on that to tell me to stop eating.

ncuneo
05-04-2010, 10:53 AM
Honestly, it's a good thing and how you should feel after you are finished. It's something we have to retrain ourselves into understanding thing difference between full and satisfied. Full is how I got to 268 lbs, satisfied is how I've gotten to 160 lbs.

BeachBreeze2010
05-04-2010, 11:34 AM
Full is how I got to 268 lbs, satisfied is how I've gotten to 160 lbs.

I like that, nc! Great quote! That one will stick with me!

QuilterInVA
05-04-2010, 11:40 AM
You should never feel full. You should feel satisfied and not hungry. Feeling full means you have eaten too much.

saef
05-04-2010, 11:46 AM
Yes, my self-regulating mechanism doesn't work right. It's not exactly broken, but it's on a time delay. I don't realize that I'm full or overly full until some time after the mounds of food have been tamped down into my stomach.

My struggle is this: Why is the feeling of being full so physically pleasurable? To the point where it's almost sexual? (Maybe we shouldn't go there on a public forum ...) That's a big component of it. To be full, replete, a little sleepy. Maybe because I connect it with a feast, that is, a family gathering with a lot of food on the table? So it's finally about connecting & love? And I'm sort of chasing after that memory when I stuff myself? A perpetual after-Thanksgiving-dinner haze of good cheer & warmth? I don't know. But I know it's one of my problems. And so, like others here, I have to use outward measurements of the normal quantity of food to ingest, because I can't rely on my messed-up inward regulatory system to do it for me.

Also thank goodness for my having read about volumetrics, and educating myself about what food can be piled on the plate, and what can't. Green beans, yeah. Broccoli, sure. Clear broth soup, bring it on. But not trail mix, which is dangerous for me in large quantities. (Not even Trader Joe's, as opposed to the kind with M&Ms & such in it.)

shortandfluffy
05-04-2010, 11:58 AM
I feel much the same way, and used to be amazed when someone would turn down cake, say, and and explain "I had a big lunch and I am full". I would think "Who's too full for a delicious cupcake? I don't even understand that". Then, one day, I realized that they are lying. At least a lot of them are. "I'm full" is a polite social lie for "I can't eat that" because many, many thin people consciously regulate their intake, which is why they are thin. They could eat, and enjoy, the cupcake, but they had a big lunch so they don't think they should.

This sounds so dumb when I type it out, but it was just a social signal I missed. I thought everyone was wired profoundly differently than I, but I am now coming to suspect that in many cases it is not that simple.

Not dumb at all.. it makes a LOT of sense. I always wondered how anyone could say NO to desert?? Now I know why.

My DH and I ended up overweight because when we went to eat we were so full we were miserable afterwards. We thought that was ok. We are now learning our limits. I don't have to clean my plate just because its there.

I eat slowly so that helps for me to tell when I am satisfied. If you feel sick and can barely move after you eat then you know you went too far! Which used to be how I ate EVERY meal.

WarMaiden
05-04-2010, 01:55 PM
My struggle is this: Why is the feeling of being full so physically pleasurable? To the point where it's almost sexual? (Maybe we shouldn't go there on a public forum ...) That's a big component of it. To be full, replete, a little sleepy. Maybe because I connect it with a feast, that is, a family gathering with a lot of food on the table? So it's finally about connecting & love? And I'm sort of chasing after that memory when I stuff myself? A perpetual after-Thanksgiving-dinner haze of good cheer & warmth?

I totally get what you are saying. Feeling stuffed IS a pleasurable feeling, to a certain extent. (There is such a thing as being over-stuffed, too.) I honestly think it's adaptive--it makes evolutionary sense that in times of extra food, humans would want to stuff themselves, and enjoy stuffing themselves, so that fat would be stored on our bodies. We're not broken because that feels good to us...it's just that our industrial food system is broken.

I distinguish my hunger/full signals into a lot of categories. There is being stuffed or "full." I don't often get full in that way anymore, nor do I really seek it out. Occasionally I will feel that way after my special Friday night dinner, where I eat a few hundred extra calories.

Then there is being satisfied. I am almost always satisfied after my regular meals, which are heavy on protein and good carbs, and always include some veggies or fruit. It's pretty rare that I am not satisfied, actually. But I also eat frequently--6 to 7 times per day.

Then there is stomach hunger. I don't mind stomach hunger that much, it's a nice feeling before eating. It's not so nice if it goes on for hours and hours. But it's good to feel those twinges of an empty stomach before putting a good, satisfying meal in it.

Then there is low-blood-sugar hunger. This is totally separate from stomach hunger; I don't have to feel stomach hunger in order to feel low-blood-sugar hunger, and vice versa. Sometimes they come together, but not often. When my blood sugar dips too low, I become faint and weak and dizzy and very cranky. I absolutely hate this feeling, hate it so much. I am very prone to hypoglycemia, so I am extremely careful with my food intake (frequent, timed, watching the protein and carb balance especially in the morning) in order to keep it away. If I do become hypoglycemic, then usually I have to eat more calories overall in the day in order to recover from it, which is a process that takes a few hours of steadily eating protein and good carbs.

ParadiseFalls
05-04-2010, 03:14 PM
I was ok for the first month, but lately I have been STARVING and I can't stand it anymore!!

Belease, I'm the same way. To a certain extent, it doesn't matter how much I've eaten--if something looks good, I could eat that, too. I thought when I got my diet rolling I wouldn't WANT the bad foods anymore. I still want them, though. The difference is just that I'm not 'allowed' to have them.

Gold32
05-04-2010, 03:48 PM
I feel much the same way, and used to be amazed when someone would turn down cake, say, and and explain "I had a big lunch and I am full". I would think "Who's too full for a delicious cupcake? I don't even understand that". Then, one day, I realized that they are lying. At least a lot of them are.

Yeah, this is definitely not all of them. When my best friend tells you she's full and can't eat another bite, she means it. And it can literally be in the middle of a hot dog, she'll just say, "Yep, I'm full, I can't eat that." If you force her, she'll feel/look miserable. I explained to her once that I don't have a "shut off" valve, that I do not know what she means by "I'm full, I can't eat that.". She was confused.

I believe there are degrees of hunger: starving, very hungry, somewhat hungry, not hungry, satisfied, full, stuffed. The problem is that I feel nothing between not hungry and stuffed. So that's what I satisfy myself with now- that I'm no longer hungry.

But sure enough, as my health and eating habits keep getting better and better, I've noticed this changing. I can feel "satisfied." I hope it's a permanent change!

beerab
05-04-2010, 03:51 PM
When I first started losing weight it took me a long time to realize that feeling "full" or "stuffed" wasn't necessary. I just had to be satisfied. Now when I eat my meals I rarely eat till I'm like "omg I'm so full" because to me it meant I over-ate.

Now I usually set out my portions- know how much it is, know it's appropriate- and then unless I'm feeling like I'm STARVING I don't eat anything else. And a lot of times if I'm still feeling like I'm not satisfied I drink a large glass of water. A lot of times I'm just thirsty!

caryesings
05-04-2010, 05:24 PM
I'm another one whose hungry/full mechanism is broken. But in a way I used that. I knew from experience that eating until I felt full did not help me not feel hungry even a few minutes later. So if it wasn't going to help, I started eating much smaller portions and just planned on eating more frequently.

Truffle
05-04-2010, 10:20 PM
Excellent thread-marking.

rockinrobin
05-04-2010, 10:38 PM
Honestly, it's a good thing and how you should feel after you are finished. It's something we have to retrain ourselves into understanding thing difference between full and satisfied. Full is how I got to 268 lbs, satisfied is how I've gotten to 160 lbs.

I can't tell you what I think of this one simple statement. Brilliant.

And yes, it was a new feeling, satisfied, not full or stuffed. Although I now know the difference, doesn't matter, I still MUST rely on a pre-determined amount of food within a certain calorie allotment.

Why DID we think stuffed was the way to go and how it should be?????

MissKelly
05-05-2010, 03:06 AM
Sharing a little treat here that I started using 3 weeks ago that will combat those hunger feelings WITHOUT ANY guilt that I now use daily. I found them on a FLUKE and I am really excited about them! Shirataki noodles, you can buy them at a local Japanese grocery store in your area. Shirataki is 100% organic, have no calories, no fat, no carbs, no sugar, no sodium, (no nothing!!), etc. They are pure fiber (the brown shirataki, which is the one with a seaweed blend is around 10'ish calories per serving, but I like the clear-white ones best because they are zero cals). I chop up a bunch of low cal veggies (green/red/yellow peppers, onions, etc), make it into a stir fry with 2 teaspoons of olive oil, garlic, pepper and sea salt for taste. Sometimes I add in a chopped Morning Star Veggie Patties or the Veggie Chicken Patties with it too.

Sometimes, I will add the shirataki noodles in with low sodium chicken broth (20 cals per serving, whole can is 40 cals). You can just play with them and make different things. The noodles immediately absorb the flavor of what is being cooked with it, they are only blah-bland by itself.

They are almost like spaghetti, except they come wet and moist in the packaging (and you have to cut them because the strands are pretty long). A little tougher/rubberier than spaghetti, but boiling them a bit makes them as soft as spaghetti. The Shirataki expands twice its size in your stomach and you do NOT need to eat a whole lot to feel full.

You can order them online, but seriously, you will find them MUCH cheaper at a local Japanese grocery store. I buy 16oz bags of them for $2.09. Today (Wed), I go to pick up a box of 20 of them at my local Japanese grocery store for a better deal that they kindly ordered extra for me. (My teenage son has been eating them up as well)

I wish I knew about them before I gained so much weight from being sick. You can look them up on the web and see for yourself how healthy they are for you too. I will not ever give these noodles up (EVER) for the rest of my life. It's making my weight loss speed up. When I need a filler if I start feeling hungry, I take a couple little scoops of the noodles (I make extra and keep them in a fridge and just micro them).

My son likes to marinate them overnight in beef broth mixed with soy sauce and adds whatever he's in the mood to add to them the next day (chopped steak, veggies, etc) He's also added spaghetti sauce on them and tossed it in the micro. He just lost 20lbs and loves them to maintain his weight loss because he is a big time snacker and he isn't hungry anymore either.

Just had to tell some that may not know about them, I read some of the posts on here and I'd walk away feeling guilty if I didn't share this with you. Walking around hungry stinks! Shirataki is making my diet SO easy and curbing my cravings for things I cannot have. Be creative with them, I do and I love them! I've been looking up nifty recipes online for them and am finding some neat ones.

Important Note: If you do not have a Japanese grocery store by you, you can look up online Japanese groceries online. But warning, there are some people online selling this noodle calling it "the miracle noodle." First of all, it is an older than dirt Oriental noodle and its been around a LONG-LONG time, it's not new. Some sites will try to rip you off and charge you $3+ a 7oz bag plus $10 shipping, (you can buy a 16oz bag for about $2!) do not fall into that trap!! I almost did until I looked in my Yellow Pages and made a call to ask them if they have it before I put my credit card info in on the inflated price site. You can find them cheaper than the ripoff "miracle" sites by just searching out Japanese online groceries for the noodle if you don't have a store near you.

I hope this helps some like it has me. Not everyone will love them as I do, lol, but some won't be able to imagine living without them either.

yoyoma
05-05-2010, 07:22 AM
I have two separate feelings, but I use the terms full and satiated and that's gonna be confusing bc other folks use the same terms differently.

I use the term full to refer to the feelings I get when my stomach is physically full. It gets that way regardless of the number of calories involved (e.g. it can be just full of water).

But even if I am full I'm often not satisfied. There's just something missing.

I find that if I save a small portion controlled health fat for the end that I can meet both needs. So a meal for me often consists of a high-volume low cal filler (soup, salad, etc) and a high-cal chaser (1 Tb peanut butter works best but nuts or dark chocolate or avacado or other healthy fats work too).

jendiet
05-05-2010, 09:01 AM
there is a lot of study being conducted on exactly why a person "never feels full" ...while the thin person experiences satiety.

leptin, hormones. all of it can be mind boggling. I don't really want to know about the studies as much as I want to KNOW what works for me.

i notice a certain phenomenon when I eat, and my son has the same issue. We eat dinner, but really we are looking forward to dessert. It's like even after such a good meal---it is not complete until we have ice cream or candy or sugar laden goodies.

whereas, my thin boyfriend who has never had a problem with weight will sometimes eat one or two plates of food, forego the sweets and be done.

I always think before I want that dessert. Something is wrong. Why am I not too full to eat dessert? Why do i want dessert, when I just ate a balanced meal.

I started to eat grapefruit alot. Sometimes with just a little bit of sugar sprinkled on. but I would squeeze the juice out. then take the skin off, and sugar it just a little and eat this. I drank grapefruit and ate grapefruit all day in between meals. MAGICALLY--or not so magically if you know the benefits of grapefruit--i stopped craving icecream all the time, I stopped wanting dessert after dinner and I was able to control my hunger better. Enough to even do a cleanse again.

which made me feel even better. I normally love sweets and chocolate. But my teacher gave me a bite size 3 muskateers duirng a test. And i actually chocked on the sweetness..and didn't feel like I could eat 10 of them in a row like normal.

grapefruit has been long known to control blood sugar, thereby reducing insulin spikes.

in short, what happened in my body was this. I had low blood sugar--my body responded by releasing insulin to make me hungry. My body overshoots my insulin needs because of bad eating and after the first 30 minutes of eating, i have an EXTRA hunger spike. which tells my body i need more fuel. Which causes THE strong NEED for something really sweet.

The book "the carbohydrate addicts diet" REALLY taught me about this.

jendiet
05-05-2010, 09:09 AM
miss kelly, thanks for the advice about shirataki noodles!

MissKelly
05-05-2010, 10:39 AM
miss kelly, thanks for the advice about shirataki noodles!

Anytime. It slows the release of insulin and digests slowly, as I understand it - and by the feel of its 'staying power' and lack of hunger, I would say that it's wholly correct. It's working and giving results - and the best part, it's something I can use later to incorporate to maintain without feeling like I am in a strict robotic diet "I must, I must" mode. I hope others will give them a try and benefit from them too. Now if they ever come out with a chocolate version of the noodle, it will be a perfect world. ;)

carter
05-05-2010, 11:06 AM
A big, big part of the weight loss process for me is learning the difference between being "full" and being "not hungry" - and striving to make sure I eat only until not hungry, rather than eating until full.

There's a simple exercise routine you can do to help with this - practice fork put-downs and table push-aways.

That is, after I eat my planned, measured amount of food, I put down the fork and get up from the table. I get away from the food environment and go do something else for a while. If I'm still hungry, my body will tell me, and I'll eat another measured, on-plan bit of food. If I'm merely not full, but not actually hungry, then doing something else is (ideally) enough to take my mind off the munchies. Water helps too.

ninepaw
05-05-2010, 04:18 PM
Oh my goodness, thank you EVERYONE for your responses! There's so much great advice here I wouldn't even begin to know how to respond to all of it... So I will use a big blanket :goodvibes: THANK YOU :goodvibes: to everybody!!!

One thing I do have to address, though...

jendiet: "The Carbohydrate Addict's Diet"? This sounds like something I may just have to look up! Because seriously - I am, as some people fondly refer to me, a carb queen. Not that I'm willing to do something like atkins - I still need to have those carbs. Just not nearly as much as I used to. But could you tell me what exactly the book is about?

jendiet
05-05-2010, 04:27 PM
well, the book has an interesting diet method. Because of what they call the carb loading---you are supposed to only eat carbs at one meal and for no longer than one hour. I really don't recommend trying to do it before you first cleanse and tone your digestive system. Otherwise you WILL REALLY crave those carbs at that "reward meal". i have tried it with a cleansed and toned digestive system...and I tried it without! BIG DIFFERENCE.

but the SCIENCE behind the book is awesome and pretty easy to understand. i couldn't believe the stories in there...the people sounded just like me....they did alot of the same things i did. Bake cookies for a sale, and end up eating half the cookies--closet eating....etc.

highflyer
05-05-2010, 08:51 PM
I'm the same way. This is why I think I eat so much because I never truly feel full. I'm trying hard to restrain it but it is quite difficult.

luciddepths
05-05-2010, 11:23 PM
i had this problem when i was only eating a TON of carbs.. once i upped my protein intake i havent had this problem.. also having a protein and a carb at one sitting helps... always a combo.

Randy
05-06-2010, 10:37 AM
hey diana,

i can definitely relate to your problem of not feeling full. i would eat 3 meals a day, but HUGE meals. i would not feel full after any meal i ate, so in order to satisfy myself, and refrain from eating another full meal, i instead snacked on junk after my meal, such as cookies, chips, gushers, you name it. About two months ago, i went on a diet. the israelidiet worked like a miracle for me. what it did for me was leave 20% of my stomach open for eating food. i am still using it today, and have no regrets, because now i can control what i eat.

So, to conclude, the answer is no, you are not the only one with this problem. i have it too and there is always a way to do something about it.

hope i was a help, diana.
-Randy

PaulaM
05-06-2010, 12:43 PM
I am most definitely a carb addict, my entire life I would eat the pasta, the potatoes and leave the meat on the plate. I could eat bread all day long. I started the Wonder Slim diet about a month ago, and for the most part I don't have those hunger pains like I did. For me, it is definitely getting rid of the "bad" carbs. I'm not doing the no carb thing, I don't think I could, but I only have one starch a day now. It's made all the difference in the world.

Katieee
05-06-2010, 02:30 PM
I used to be that way, I was scared to be hungry. I have to do a lot of mental wrangling to tell myself I was being ridiculous.

Renwomin
05-07-2010, 11:17 AM
I don't have this issue anymore since I've changed the way I've been eating. Except for breakfast half of my meals at least are typically composed of vegetables, about one quarter lean protein, one quarter whole grain carb (if that sometimes).

The vegetables give a lot of volume to my food and allow me to eat more without adding a lot of calories. I'm also not eating hardly any junk. I'm generally eating low sugar, lower fat and low-moderate whole wheat carbs. I don't restrict vegetables at all (unless they have a high calorie sauce on them.) I can't eat as much as I used to. I used to be able to polish of a heaping plate of food and go back for seconds. Now I am extremely full at less than half the food I used to eat.

I'm not sure exactly why it has happened, but I have found it an extreme blessing.

Btw, Luciddepths mentioned protein and that has been proved to have a more lasting filling effect than carbs and fat.

synger
05-07-2010, 02:27 PM
I've found that I'm very carb sensitive. If I eat too many (the "normal" 6-11 servings of the USDA Pyramid), even if I were counting calories, I'd never feel satisfied. An hour later I'd be looking for something to munch.

As I've lowered my carb intake (and I don't need to go to drastic levels), I've found my satiety increasing and my "munchies" and cravings decreasing. When they begin again, I know I've got too much carb in my diet. It's a slow, steady process of listening to my body and finding what works best for me.

SandieV
01-12-2012, 08:34 PM
My body does not tell me that I am full. I could eat and eat and never feel full. I usually stop eating, because I know I should, but it's not from a full perspective. On the other end, I do get hungry. I noticed this when my last daughter was born 5 yrs ago. Ideas?

lin43
01-13-2012, 06:58 PM
What a great thread! It's an issue so many of us struggle with.

Yes, my self-regulating mechanism doesn't work right. It's not exactly broken, but it's on a time delay. I don't realize that I'm full or overly full until some time after the mounds of food have been tamped down into my stomach.

My struggle is this: Why is the feeling of being full so physically pleasurable? To the point where it's almost sexual? (Maybe we shouldn't go there on a public forum ...) That's a big component of it. To be full, replete, a little sleepy. Maybe because I connect it with a feast, that is, a family gathering with a lot of food on the table? So it's finally about connecting & love? And I'm sort of chasing after that memory when I stuff myself? A perpetual after-Thanksgiving-dinner haze of good cheer & warmth? I don't know. But I know it's one of my problems. And so, like others here, I have to use outward measurements of the normal quantity of food to ingest, because I can't rely on my messed-up inward regulatory system to do it for me.

Also thank goodness for my having read about volumetrics, and educating myself about what food can be piled on the plate, and what can't. Green beans, yeah. Broccoli, sure. Clear broth soup, bring it on. But not trail mix, which is dangerous for me in large quantities. (Not even Trader Joe's, as opposed to the kind with M&Ms & such in it.)

Saef, I love reading your posts because you're so articulate. You raise a great question about the reason fullness is so pleasurable----and only to some, not to others. My husband doesn't like feeling full. Often, he will leave the table, saying, "I could eat that [what is left on his plate] but I would be too full."

I saw an interesting programme with this in it - they had a bunch of little kids and gave them lunch. Then they asked them how full they were, and most of them pointed to the diagram of the person whose stomach was full of food. Then, they started the kids off drawing and gave them a plate of party food. It was really interesting to see that some of the kids just left the food, because they didn't want it because they were full. Some had one or two pieces. Some just sat there mindlessly cramming piece after piece into their mouths until they had eaten the whole plate-full. I can categorically state that I would have been the kid with nothing left on my plate at the end. There's just something about my brain that doesn't seem to feel there's any connection between having already had food, and eating more. At times I honestly used to make myself feel ill from eating too much. But since I started controlling my calories, I've not felt that in a long time, and I really really like it!
This is interesting because it supports my belief that the main difference between those of us who struggle with our weight and those who naturally maintain a healthy weight is not so much metabolism as it is our brains. I want food more than my naturally thin husband. My hunger and fullness signals are not as keen as his.

Then, one day, I realized that they are lying. At least a lot of them are. "I'm full" is a polite social lie for "I can't eat that" because many, many thin people consciously regulate their intake, which is why they are thin. They could eat, and enjoy, the cupcake, but they had a big lunch so they don't think they should.
This sounds so dumb when I type it out, but it was just a social signal I missed. I thought everyone was wired profoundly differently than I, but I am now coming to suspect that in many cases it is not that simple.

I do think that there’s some truth to this, too. I think many people control their weight but don't announce that that's what they're doing. However, in some cases, they really don’t want it (my husband is like this).

peachyfuzz
01-13-2012, 07:27 PM
I have that problem a lot, my parents call me the bottomless pit! Sometimes though, I feel a bit sick after I eat, but feel compelled to eat more- then the sick feeling goes away for a bit but then comes back. Do you think this is psychological or might I actually have a problem? Anyway, don;t worry about the not feeling full thing, I'm told that if you diet your body thinks that you're starving so that might be why.