Weight Loss Support - Anyone here diet without "dieting"?




Beach Patrol
04-28-2010, 10:29 AM
I'm talking about just eating clean, very little processed foods, mostly eating whatever/as much as you want, but good clean foods -not canned or packaged in other words- and just exercise lightly (such as walking 30 minutes a day) .... and if so, how are your results? Do you feel like you're dieting? Do you feel good physically?

I've been reading a book (Oh no!!! LOL....) called The Schwarzbein Principle, by Diana Schwarzbein (MD), about "controlled carbs"....

To give you an idea... this is an excerpt from the website

The Schwarzbein Principle:

Degenerative diseases of aging are not genetic but acquired. Because the systems of the human body are interconnected and because one imbalance creates another imbalance, poor eating and lifestyle habits, not genetics, are the cause of degenerative disease.

Dr. Schwarzbein claims that even very overweight people can be malnourished, but because most people identify malnourishment with extremely thin, they don't see or comprehend the malnourishment.

Anyway - just wonder if anyone else has read the book and/or applied the principles and how you feel as compared to when you were dieting like crazy & not losing any weight!


Glory87
04-28-2010, 11:10 AM
While I do emphasize whole foods and limit processed foods*, I have to add portion control as a valuable component for healthy eating. Even after all this time, I will happily eat way more than a reasonable portion if it's on my plate. Since I know that about myself, I try to serve myself reasonable, healthy portion sizes.

Some foods are especially problematic, I know that I will be measuring the following foods for the rest of my life: brown rice, pasta, nuts, salad dressing.

For my life, it is not a hardship, it is just something to be done, like flossing and paying bills.

* I eat a lot of canned foods - especially canned tomatoes and beans.

PaulaM
04-28-2010, 11:38 AM
I agree totally with the eating, but disagree with the small amount of exercise. When I joined the Y last November the trainer told me you really have to do both, eat right and get lots of exercise. In this modern world most of us just push buttons to do things, not like back in the "olden" days when you had to work to get your food and everything else. The human body is not meant to move so little.


Viviane
04-28-2010, 11:41 AM
I'm doing Tosca Reno's "Eat Clean Diet." I wish she had named it something else, because I really don't consider it a diet. It's a lifestyle change as far as I'm concerned, one that's definitely for the better!
The plan is pretty much exactly what you described, Beach Patrol. In a nutshell, it's eating whole foods that are nutrient dense and naturally low calorie/low fat (or, have good fats). You eat six times a day or about every 2 1/2 - 3 hours.

I love it! I really can't say enough about it. I feel satisfied, I'm not craving junk food, and I have way more energy. My body feels like it's starting to wake up. I can't wait until I'm a few months in and have lost more weight- if I feel this good being close to 300 pounds, I'm thinking I'll feel fantastic around 150! :D

The book you're reading sounds interesting. I don't buy that all degenerative diseases are due entirely to lifestyle/diet, but I think she's on the right track. Decades of eating chemicalized, nutrient poor foods in sometimes massive quantities takes a toll. I think we're only starting to learn the implications of what people have been convinced is food.

ETA: I think learning portion control is important, but you don't have to use a measuring cup or scale. There are ways to eyeball a food and compare it to something that's familiar to you so you don't have to break out a measuring cup everytime you eat. But, if you're more comfortable doing that, do it!
For health/endurance, I really believe that more than 30 minutes of walking is needed. Weight-bearing exercise is important.

Eliana
04-28-2010, 11:44 AM
I focus on portion control with clean eating too. I could definitely eat too many berries. ;)

And exercise...well that's hard for me to comment on because I just love it so much. I feel like I have control over how much exercise I do and how much gain I make in my fitness level whereas I do not have any control over my weight loss.

sf40
04-28-2010, 12:36 PM
I'm talking about just eating clean, very little processed foods, mostly eating whatever/as much as you want, but good clean foods -not canned or packaged in other words- and just exercise lightly (such as walking 30 minutes a day) .... and if so, how are your results? Do you feel like you're dieting? Do you feel good physically?

I have been kinda-sorta doing this over the past couple of years with lots of tweaks. The changes have been gradual enough that I am happy with what I am eating and do not feel deprived - lots of fresh veggies and fruits, some lean meats, some whole grains, good fats like almonds and avocados, some treats here and there, very little processed foods, though some canned foods such as tomatoes and beans. One of my recent tweaks was to really cut back on the treats and I have lost several pounds in the past few weeks.

I also stepped up my exercise a couple of months ago for other health reasons and am really feeling an increase in my energy. I am doing mainly cardio consisting of fast walking with intervals, bike riding, and hiking. I plan to add yoga now that I have more energy and can fit in more exercise (don't feel the need to sleep so much!) ;)

I am very happy with what I am doing and believe I can stick with it as a lifestyle.

WarMaiden
04-28-2010, 01:21 PM
I eat extremely "clean" but in order to lose weight I must count calories / limit portions and get a lot of exercise. When I don't limit portions and I don't exercise, I just maintain--which is a fine thing to do, but it's not my goal at present. When I started out 2 years ago, I did not count calories or limit portions and I did lose a significant quantity of weight pretty quickly, but that was mostly due to removing sugar and white refined junk from my diet.

Beach Patrol
04-28-2010, 01:28 PM
I eat extremely "clean" but in order to lose weight I must count calories / limit portions and get a lot of exercise. When I don't limit portions and I don't exercise, I just maintain--which is a fine thing to do, but it's not my goal at present. When I started out 2 years ago, I did not count calories or limit portions and I did lose a significant quantity of weight pretty quickly, but that was mostly due to removing sugar and white refined junk from my diet.

Yeah, dumping that sugar & white refined junk seems to be an important key. And yet, I did that once - absolutely NO junk or snacks that I couldn't "pick from a tree", I mean no candies, no granola bars, no colas, nada! - and I didn't lose a single ounce of weight - PLUS, I was exercising 1.5 hours a day 4 days a week! And friends would say "oh, I just cut out sodas & hardly exercise at all & I lost 25 lbs! (humph!) My body is confusing me! :dizzy:

rockinrobin
04-28-2010, 01:39 PM
Oh I need the combination of the *clean* eating PLUS calorie counting. The counting provides built in accountability and much needed PORTION CONTROL.

I have gained weight from overeating butternut squash, pineapple, berries, etc.

For consistent, steady weight loss and now maintenance, there can be *no *eating whatever I want/as much as I want*. There is no way around that. It just can't be an open ended food fest. There HAS to be limits - yes, even on the healthy stuff. They've got calories too!! and if you eat too much of them, well, you can't lose/maintain.

But I don't find it a burden. I love the foods that I'm eating and the portions are more than adequate to keep me well nourished and satiated.

rockinrobin
04-28-2010, 01:49 PM
I just wanted to add, I don't consider what I do as *dieting* as the title asked.

This is no diet that *I'm on*. I eat responsibly and carefully - adhering to a healthy diet. And that's noteworthy, because I had to stop looking at it as a *diet* to be on. As corny as it sounds, it really was about accepting the fact that I would have to permanently alter my eating behaviors. And when I accepted that fact, that's when I started to look for and find the joy in this and not as *poor me*, I can't eat this and I can't eat that. But wow, look what I DO get to eat. Foods that taste great and are great for me.

Beach Patrol
04-28-2010, 01:56 PM
I agree; I don't think anyone can "eat as much as they want" no matter how healthy a food is for you - there MUST be limits. But there's SO MUCH information out there, and so much of it contradicts other stuff, sometimes it's just a PITA to try to sort it all out.

The SP maintains "Do not count calories. Instead, balance the amount of proteins, healthy fats, real carbohydrates and non-starchy vegetables in your meals to meet your current metabolism and activity levels. Calories in versus calories out is a myth."

Myth - oh Really? Then again, I've always thought that a calorie is a calorie - not true. 40/30/30 seems to be "the proper ratio"... but then again, I guess it makes a difference on how ACTIVE one is...

rockinrobin
04-28-2010, 02:07 PM
I agree; I don't think anyone can "eat as much as they want" no matter how healthy a food is for you - there MUST be limits. But there's SO MUCH information out there, and so much of it contradicts other stuff, sometimes it's just a PITA to try to sort it all out.


It may be a PITA to figure it all out, but it's a bigger PITA to remain overweight.

And I think you need to stop looking at all the information out there and find something that works for YOU. Something that works for you and something that you are WILLING to MAKE work.

I have found that by eating those healthy foods AND counting my calories, well that's the only *balancing* that I need. By doing those two things, everything else has fallen into place. Though I should add that I DO have a difficult time with grains - even healthy ones and that I DO have a difficult time with the starchier veggies, such as potatoes and corn. But I had to experiment and find that out on my own. Not sure if any of the *information* would have told me that. Trial and error. Can't be beat. It is worth the experimentation and any and all effort put towards it. :)

WarMaiden
04-28-2010, 02:18 PM
The SP maintains "Do not count calories. Instead, balance the amount of proteins, healthy fats, real carbohydrates and non-starchy vegetables in your meals to meet your current metabolism and activity levels. Calories in versus calories out is a myth."

Statements like "calories in versus calories out is a myth" are made for the simple purpose of selling magic-formula diets. The laws of thermodynamics apply to human bodies just as they apply elsewhere in the physical universe. And while it's true that some styles of eating (elminating high-GI carbs, for example) do help people feel less hungry and more satisfied and thus naturally eat less, these styles of eating don't somehow defy the laws of nature and lead to weight loss even in a calorie surplus.

mkendrick
04-28-2010, 02:51 PM
I don't feel like I'm on a diet. Shoot, later tonight, after my homemade chicken tacos and southwest salad, I'm going to have a whole chocolate bar AND a mocha smoothie. This morning I had an epic bowl of oatmeal.

I do calorie count. But, I also like to eat, quantity is just as important as quality. So to eat a lot of food, it didn't take me long to figure out that eating mostly unprocessed whole foods, mostly lean proteins, fiber and water heavy foods, and veggies was the way to go. Just by doing the math problem: highest volume to lowest calorie content makes me eat a balanced diet. Also, with the desire to eat more food, I'm very much encouraged to exercise more to increase my deficit. That being said, with calorie counting, I can very easily plan in junk treats that are simply for my own sanity and happiness. Such as my chocolate bar tonight.

Yes, I will most likely have to count calories for the rest of my life, so I will always be on a "diet." Perhaps I'll eventually get so well-versed in it, that I may not even have to plan and record, but I'm okay with doing it forever. I don't have a problem with that though. Either way, I'll have to stay under X amount of calories to maintain my weight. I don't care which diet I'm on or not on, that fact holds true. So I can either remain on my "diet" forever and eat X amount of calories, or I can stop "dieting" and gain the weight back. Two choices...I like the first one.

Eliana
04-28-2010, 02:58 PM
Oh, the "calories in vs. calories out MYTH" pushes my buttons! :tantrum: It's so not a myth and has played a part in how I got so fat!! I wish someone had told me it's NOT a myth a long time ago!

I grew up with the low-fat dieting craze...and I got fatter.

I tried other fabulous methods of eating certain foods in magic combinations...and I got fatter.

Calorie counting, however, works! Like Robin, I've had to tweak it. I've had to learn about insulin resistance and adjust accordingly. Now I'm learning about cholesterol and am adjusting to meet those needs. But it's still about how many calories I am eating.

The only thing about calories in vs. calories out that I do NOT believe is that it doesn't matter what those calories are. Some say that though it's not exactly nutritious, you CAN lose weight on 1200 calories of pudding. I just don't think that's possible.

mkendrick
04-28-2010, 03:13 PM
Oh, the "calories in vs. calories out MYTH" pushes my buttons! :tantrum: It's so not a myth and has played a part in how I got so fat!! I wish someone had told me it's NOT a myth a long time ago!

I grew up with the low-fat dieting craze...and I got fatter.

I tried other fabulous methods of eating certain foods in magic combinations...and I got fatter.

Calorie counting, however, works! Like Robin, I've had to tweak it. I've had to learn about insulin resistance and adjust accordingly. Now I'm learning about cholesterol and am adjusting to meet those needs. But it's still about how many calories I am eating.

The only thing about calories in vs. calories out that I do NOT believe is that it doesn't matter what those calories are. Some say that though it's not exactly nutritious, you CAN lose weight on 1200 calories of pudding. I just don't think that's possible.

Why not? :)

The body would adjust, and since it wouldn't be getting adequate nutrients, the metabolism would slow down. While energy needs may be met (calories), building blocks (proteins) and minerals and vitamin needs would not be.

All food is made up of the same components of organic molecules. A protein molecule from a piece of lean chicken breast is utilized the exact same way a protein molecule from a bit of pudding is. Same molecular structure, same biochemical pathways, resulting in the same amount of energy. That energy will be burned the same way no matter what the source, if it's not burned, it will be stored the same way. This goes for a molecule of sugar from an M&M versus a molecule of sugar from an apple. Or a molecule of fat from an avocado versus a Big Mac. Or a carbohydrate molecule from a french fry versus a corn kernal.

It's not a mysterious process. A calorie isn't a mystical term. It's a precise measured unit of energy. For a body to gain weight, as in create fat deposits, from 1200cal of pudding as opposed to losing weight on 1200 calories of whole unprocessed healthy foods, violates the laws of physics. It suggests that MORE fat deposits/energy is coming from the same amount of energy in.

You could eat a small bowl of 1200 calories of lard everyday and lose weight. You'd just be horrendously malnourished.

Eliana
04-28-2010, 03:26 PM
No one ever told my body any of that. ;) It thinks sugar should stay in the blood stream and then that sugar should be stored as fat, even if the source of that sugar is from an APPLE. :dizzy:

JayEll
04-28-2010, 03:53 PM
Eliana! :rofl:

Hey Beach Patrol! :wave: I love Dr. Schwarzbein and the book you're talking about. It's how I discovered that overeating carbs, not fats, are the culprit in high cholesterol. I followed her principles for quite a stretch some years ago.

However... Even though I believe her principles are sound, and even though I had good success in feeling healthy and having a stable weight when following her program, it is LIKE ANYTHING ELSE. If you "forget" what you're doing, and stray into the wrong foods or the wrong amounts, then you aren't following the program any longer, and all bets are off. :(

I gained quite a bit of weight after I strayed away from Schwarzbein, but it was not the fault of her program. And to lose weight this most recent time, I did have to watch both calories and nutrient percentages (proteins, fats, carbs). Oh, and I had to get fit as well. That didn't mean exercise like a maniac, but it did mean getting off my sedentary butt 5 or 6 times a week.

Hope you're doing well! :hug:
Jay

cjdeluca
04-28-2010, 06:46 PM
I've been following a whole foods "diet" for a few months now. At first, I learned that I needed to pay attention to how many nuts I was eating. I was eating too many raw almonds and realized that this was NOT helping me.
I've been eating a ton of fresh fruits and vegetables. No fast-food, and no processed foods. It's the first time that a "diet" plan has made me feel better physically even though the weight loss isn't yet huge. I've noticed that now if I have fast-food it makes me feel aweful, so I choose to stay away. It's helped a lot.

I guess the point is that a whole foods lifestyle is definitely worth it. The first few days/week may be hard but it's totally worth it. You'll feel better and be healthier which is what we all really want in the end. I haven't been exercising alot lately but have lost 11 pounds in the last 6 weeks. It doesn't seem like much but for me, weight loss has been very difficult. So I'm happy with the way this kind of lifestlye works for me.

Another thing that I've learned from a whole foods nutritionist that I've met with is that when you eat a carb, you should also eat a protein. An example given to me was to eat nuts when you eat a fruit. It helps to balance your blood sugar levels and keeps them consistent through the day. It also helps you feel more full.

cjdeluca
04-28-2010, 08:36 PM
I forgot to mention that one book that I read that got me to even think about a raw food diet is The Raw Food Detox Diet by Natalia Rose. I found the book to be informtative and interesting. I couldn't go completely "raw" so I ended up using info and this book and other info that I've gained over time to start with my whole foods lifestlye that includes lots of raw veggies and fruit. Hope this helps someone.

I've also read Green Smoothie Revolution by Victoria Boutenko and while I found it helpful and informative I realized that green smoothies were not my thing. If you like them, then hey, go for it, it's really healthy!

onthedietagain
04-29-2010, 12:54 PM
lots of fresh veggies and fruits, some lean meats, some whole grains, good fats like almonds and avocados, some treats here and there, very little processed foods, though some canned foods such as tomatoes and beans. I am very happy with what I am doing and believe I can stick with it as a lifestyle.

That is what I am doing. I had a great success to maintain weight that way for few years and didn’t exercise (I was walking every day though).

Have to tell you, that it is a great plan to maintain weight BUT to lose weight there is has to be more exercise.

For a month I lost only 1 lb :snooty: with eating healthy, portion control, listening my body for “I am hungry” / “I am full” signals and 7 hours/week of walking. I believe I can continue doing just that and lose 1 lb per month, but I have no patience for that, so I have to go back to fitness club and exercise to speed up my weight loss.

Beach Patrol
04-29-2010, 03:07 PM
Hey Beach Patrol! :wave:

HEY JayEll!!!!!! Hope you're doing OK!!!! :D

I love Dr. Schwarzbein and the book you're talking about. It's how I discovered that overeating carbs, not fats, are the culprit in high cholesterol. I followed her principles for quite a stretch some years ago.

I have successfully lowered my cholesterol and my triglycerides and I'm feeling a bit better (energy wise) but I STILL haven't lost a single ounce! NO! -not one! :( It's so damn frustrating.

I've been exercising and watching portion size & calorie counting & eating "cleaner", etc. but it just doesn't seem to be enough. It's daunting. And I can't figure out what I'm doing wrong! I've tried exercising MORE. I've tried eating MORE (if I eat any less, I will NOT be healthy). I've tried food combining, cutting out this, eating more of that, South Beach, Beck, Power90, Metabolic Research Center, blahblahblah. I've lost weight in the past - 20, 30, 40 pounds! - But NOW, now that I'm in peri-menopause, NONE of it is working FOR ME. I've been to the doctor, my health is generally GOOD. I'm just "overweight". :?:

I've yo-yo dieted for yearssssssssss now, and I really think that Dr. Schwarzbein has a solid niche on the imbalance thing. I think I've "dieted" my body into stubbornness! - and what my body needs to do is HEAL. And I really want to HEAL.

I have no grandiose ideas of being 120 or 125 lbs. I'd LIKE to get down to 135. I'd be pretty damn content with 150 at this point, but I can't seem to get below 170, & it's been about 3 years now. :censored: And yeah, I'm really frustrated, and giving-up is not an option, so I guess I'll continue to be frustrated.

Hey, other than that - I'm doing really great!! :carrot: (Cause thin isn't everything! :D )

sf40
04-29-2010, 05:15 PM
I've been exercising and watching portion size & calorie counting & eating "cleaner", etc. but it just doesn't seem to be enough. It's daunting. And I can't figure out what I'm doing wrong! I've tried exercising MORE. I've tried eating MORE (if I eat any less, I will NOT be healthy). I've tried food combining, cutting out this, eating more of that, South Beach, Beck, Power90, Metabolic Research Center, blahblahblah. I've lost weight in the past - 20, 30, 40 pounds! - But NOW, now that I'm in peri-menopause, NONE of it is working FOR ME. I've been to the doctor, my health is generally GOOD. I'm just "overweight". :?:

I can so relate. My weight suddenly shot up in my mid to late 30s and all the stuff I used to do did not work any more. At age 40, I did much of what is mentioned in the paragraph above. After 10 months of very careful eating and very frequent exercise (I was unemployed and had plenty of time), I lost .... about 15 pounds and went from a tight size 14 to a loose size 12. After I started working and did not want to spend so much time exercising and obsessing about food, I gained all the weight back plus a couple of bonus pounds. The endocrinologist I consulted who guaranteed I would lose weight on his plan even dumped me because I didn't lose weight.

So a couple of years ago I just gave up on the whole weight loss thing. I started by actually giving myself permission to eat whatever I wanted, whenever I wanted. Yeah, I had some junk food feeding frenzies. And yeah, my weight went up even more and I felt not-so-good for a while, particularly after the frenzies. But it was weird that by giving myself permission to eat what I wanted when I wanted, the urge went away pretty quickly.

As I indicated, it has taken me two years to get to where I am now. While I've always been a pretty healthy eater, my eating has evolved to where I really do not want junk or processed food. I can honestly say that. I don't necessarily recommend this approach. It is scary ... some people gain weight, some may continue to eat poorly, etc. But I had to take the chance because what I was doing wasn't working.

I am still overweight, so I am not convinced that my approach is working now. But I am slowly losing weight, I am in a smaller clothing size, I take measurements and am shrinking. Most important, I feel better now. Will be seeing the doctor in a few months to see about blood pressure and cholesterol, which I am sure (hope) is better. But it took two years to get here.

koceank29
04-30-2010, 09:09 PM
I do the Primal Blueprint lifestyle and absolutely love it. The key are grains and sugar IMO, my diet consists of proteins,veggies,nuts,seeds,oils(fats),berries,min imal dairy. It took me years to figure this out for my body, I have been eating a so-called healthy diet for a very long time and could not lose weight, I would eat 1800-2000 and eat my oatmeal or brown rice and other healthy carbs and never drop a pound. Now I eat the same amount of calories but none of them come from grains or processed sugar and I lose weight. I'm sure everyone's body responds differently and no one way is right, but I know now what works for my body chemistry.
I hope you find what works for you.

jynx
05-01-2010, 06:54 AM
I'm counting calories but eating clean too, to be honest, I'm struggling to eat enough calories eating like this. With clean, healthy food, I'm finding I would have to eat loads to actually go overboard....so really the "eating clean" theory should work since I imagine it would generally make you eat fewer calories anyway :)

rockinrobin
05-01-2010, 08:46 AM
I'm counting calories but eating clean too, to be honest, I'm struggling to eat enough calories eating like this. With clean, healthy food, I'm finding I would have to eat loads to actually go overboard....so really the "eating clean" theory should work since I imagine it would generally make you eat fewer calories anyway :)

Haha. Let me have a free for all (no counting) with healthy foods and I will DEFINITELY show you how one can overeat them and not lose weight (& gain too). I'd have no problem doing so, none at all. :)

No, *for me*, I need to count/track them But we are all different. I would suppose it would be different for a 287 lb person to not overdo eating healthy foods as opposed to a 160 lb someone. But not necessarily. There are no givens.

Karen925
05-01-2010, 07:05 PM
I gained my weight on healthy eating- nuts, olive oil, whole wheat rolls, cheese, whole organic milk, etc. It wasn't from the usual suspects at all.