100 lb. Club - To Heck with Kirst Alley - JamieOliver all the way!!!




Trazey34
03-22-2010, 03:10 PM
Kirstie's show left me cold, but I'm ALL OVER "Jamie Oliver's FOOD REVOLUTION" it was amazing!! I could not even believe the food the adminstrators were feeding kids in elementary schools!

Breakfast - PIZZA!

lunch -- chicken nuggets, instant mashed potatoes, chocolate or strawberry milk!!!

he brought in fresh chicken to prepare and they looked at it like it was devil food! LOL insane!!!! I'm so going to watch this show and wish him success in changing the hearts & minds of the fattest city in America!


tigger175
03-22-2010, 04:19 PM
I just watched the sneek preview on abc.com and loved it also!

wannabesomebody
03-22-2010, 04:24 PM
I cannot believe how rude that town is. Even making a grown man cry! Then they had the audacity to make Jaimie say he wouldn't make them look bad even though they're turds. Ugh they made me mad.


ShylahEQ
03-22-2010, 04:34 PM
How ironic, a lady in my office just TOLD me about this show.

I can't believe it!

Summerblue
03-22-2010, 05:33 PM
Hmmmm, I will definately have to check it out now, I wasn't sure what it was all about.

Thankfully both my kids are BAG lunchers :)

Summerblue
03-22-2010, 05:35 PM
Ha...I was just thinking, they should do a reality show on all of us 3FC ers....LOL a day in the life........... ;)

mandalinn82
03-22-2010, 05:52 PM
It's on Hulu.

I'm 15 minutes in, and I've got a little crush on Jamie Oliver. What a wonderful (AND NECESSARY) message.

rockinrobin
03-22-2010, 06:19 PM
He's adorable and has a great message.

I can't tell you how many people have asked me if I "subject" my children to my "way of eating".

"No, only I deserve to eat well, to eat the finest things that there is. My kids. Feh. I serve them any old garbage. "

cathydoe
03-22-2010, 08:30 PM
It was a GREAT show...and I am one of those people that have to follow the Federal Food Program Guidelines and once I signed up for it the food changed because of the CN labels (CN means child nutrition) BUT ha it is all PROCESSED food! And you wouldn't believe the PAPERWORK that is involved!! I could go on and on and on...but I am going to make some changes!!

Angihas2
03-22-2010, 09:50 PM
Just watched it on Hulu, it makes me want to make my kids brown baggers. They've been begging for months and me, for convenience sake and knowing they eat healthy everywhere BUT lunch at school, let it slide. We're buying lunch boxes and baggies tomorrow. That's freaking insanity!! But, I watched it with my sister in law and her 4 kids, all but 1 of whom is overweight and steadily sliding into teen obesity and all her kids could say is 'YUMMM'....I wanted to cry.

LitChick
03-22-2010, 10:36 PM
He makes special appearances on The Biggest Loser and is great on there, so I will have to check out his new show.

Kirstie Alley I can only take in small doses - sometimes I find her funny and sometimes not. I don't think I'll watch her new show.

ETA: Ooops, I just realized I got my celebrity chefs mixed up! Curtis Stone is the one who does BL.

HeatherMcG
03-22-2010, 10:36 PM
That menu sounds like a typical Friday at the school where I work. It is really sad that the only food they get is so heavily processed.

Hyacinth
03-22-2010, 10:55 PM
I was thrilled to see this last night. I'm curious to see what propositions he will make. Great show, charming guy!

duckyyellowfeet
03-22-2010, 11:38 PM
I went to elementary school not that long ago. I remember watching kids pour ranch dressing on grease soaked pizza. Or the pathetic fruit bowl with nothing but mealy red apples. I took a lunch to school every day, and while I may have been packing calorie-heavy meals, at least there was some nutrition.

Part of me wishes that we could just make all that crud illegal. Fast-food burgers with 1400 calories, restaurant meals with 2400 calories...oh man. If only i ruled the world

Windchime
03-23-2010, 12:03 AM
I have had a crush on Jamie Oliver for a long time, since he had his first cooking show where it looked like he was cooking in his apartment for friends. I wanted to Tivo his show but it looks like I missed it, so it's off to Hulu I go!

PaulaM
03-23-2010, 12:19 AM
I watched it too. My goodness, I was so appalled at the waste of food. Couldn't they save the fruit at least, wash it and give it to a food bank? The church family never made a vegetable or a salad? I saw a similar show from the UK, it was the same thing, nobody ate fruit or vegetables AT ALL. It blew me away.

Twitter
03-23-2010, 12:38 AM
I believe Jamie's show repeats this coming Friday. I'm not sure if it is a repeat of the first hour then a new hour but I think they said it is a two hour program Friday night.
I loved it too and actually looked today for the recipe for the baked/roasted chicken but didn't find it.

zoya417
03-23-2010, 12:47 AM
It just seemed like the lunch ladies didn't want to have to actually work. Instant potatoes are much easier than fresh veggies.

Twitter
03-23-2010, 12:50 AM
I think you nailed it Zoya - they were old enough to remember school cafeterias actually cooking the meals yet they acted like it was almost impossible to do for 450 kids. That is actually a small school in my experience.

Windchime
03-23-2010, 02:21 AM
Interestingly enough, I was reading a board on another site which mentioned Jamie Oliver and supplied this link. He was a TED award winner this year, and here is his speech. It's kind of long at about 20 minutes, but I found it very inspiring and motivational. He's a great speaker. Kind of manic but really compelling!

http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/jamie_oliver.html

wannabesomebody
03-23-2010, 02:34 AM
i must admit to the hey chicken is the first ingredient so it must be ok way of thinking so I'm starting to take a look at the processed foods and why it's yummier even if it's simple mashed potatoes. hmmm

JustSharing83
03-23-2010, 02:43 AM
I just set Tivo to record all new episodes so I can check it out! Thanks for the recommendation!

Daimere
03-23-2010, 05:11 AM
There is a great blog that shows a teacher eating everything that is served for the kids. And I can't find it. :(

Daimere
03-23-2010, 05:14 AM
Found it: http://www.nydailynews.com/lifestyle/food/2010/03/19/2010-03-19_anonymous_teacher_eats_school_lunches_every_day _for_a_year_on_fed_up_with_lunch_.html

That's the article about it.

MindiV
03-23-2010, 07:52 AM
I watched it too. My goodness, I was so appalled at the waste of food. Couldn't they save the fruit at least, wash it and give it to a food bank? The church family never made a vegetable or a salad? I saw a similar show from the UK, it was the same thing, nobody ate fruit or vegetables AT ALL. It blew me away.

When I was growing up my mom worked in a school cafeteria here in Texas for YEARS. The policy was, even back then, NO FOOD LEAVES THE CAFETERIA....unless it's to go to the dumpster. We were about 10 steps below the poverty level, so she'd sneak some out every day to bring home to us for supper, but would've been fired in a heartbeat if anyone ever found out.

Even then I thought it was stupid...I mean, just the HUGE amount of waste!

And don't get me started on the menus now...this week's school menu where I live:
Monday Breakfast - Sausage roll with mustard; lunch - mini tacos or pepperoni hot pocket with cheesy bread sticks
Tues. Breakfast - breakfast pizza; lunch -- ravioli with cheese stuffed stix or chicken on a bun with chips
Wed. breakfast - sausage biscuit with jelly; lunch - cheeseburger with "smiles" (a cute name for potato wedges) or burrito and "smiles"
Thu. breakfast - pancake on a stick with syrup; lunch - chicken nuggets and a roll or deli wrap with chips
Fri breakfast - french toast stix with syrup; lunch - Uncrustable PB&J with chips or cheese pizza with bread stix

It says at the bottom of the menu that, for breakfast each day they also offer an assortment of pop tarts, milks and juices, an oatmeal breakfast cookie, cereal bars and string cheese and crackers. For lunch they offer assorted milks, "fresh fruits" veggies and desserts.

The one that KILLS ME the most is Friday lunch. Uncrustables. Those FROZEN things in the breakfast freezer section of the grocery store. Seriously? For lunch?

MindiV
03-23-2010, 07:55 AM
It just seemed like the lunch ladies didn't want to have to actually work. Instant potatoes are much easier than fresh veggies.

It's all about the money. The cafeteria workers don't meet once a month and plan menus together, and it's not that they don't want to work (at least not all of them). They don't get to pick the food....Here one lady picks the menu and she's charged with making sure the cafeteria MAKES money...so she picks cheap and fast stuff that kids will buy. Kids who bring their lunches don't buy at school - hence the potato wedges and pizza in my post above.

Eliana
03-23-2010, 08:01 AM
Just watched it on Hulu, it makes me want to make my kids brown baggers. They've been begging for months and me, for convenience sake and knowing they eat healthy everywhere BUT lunch at school, let it slide. We're buying lunch boxes and baggies tomorrow. That's freaking insanity!! But, I watched it with my sister in law and her 4 kids, all but 1 of whom is overweight and steadily sliding into teen obesity and all her kids could say is 'YUMMM'....I wanted to cry.

Ugh...*sigh*. This is me too. I think I'm going to continue to let it slide and start fresh next year. I hate making school lunches! Well...my kids can make them, I hate shopping for them. It's just one of those things. You know, the plate only holds so much and my plate is pretty full.

But I know first hand what their breakfasts and lunches are. I feed children breakfasts every morning. Here's a rundown: cream filled bagels (look like corn dogs), pastry, cereal bar, sugar cereal, chocolate milk, orange juice, animal crackers (!), teddy grahams (!), etc.

ETA: My kids do NOT eat breakfast at school. No, no, no.

harrismm
03-23-2010, 08:11 AM
In 14 years, my children have never eaten one meal at school for this reason. 2.50 a day times 3...7.50 a day. Ridiculous. I have packed their lunches for 14 years and love doing it.

Angihas2
03-23-2010, 09:43 AM
Well, overall, at home anyway my kids always pick fresh fruits and veggies, flat out wraps or flat out pizzas and since I pack my lunch for work, I'll just pack theirs up at the same time. To me, it's completely and totally worth it. When I saw that food in that family's house all piled up, I gagged. That's the EXACT food the cafeterias are serving. A weeks worth of that x2, (I have two kids) adds up to a lot of chemicals, a lot of fat and a lot of unhealthy carbs they don't need, especially given the early onset of diabetes in my family.

Trazey34
03-23-2010, 10:37 AM
I watched it again and love him even more! LOL He's setting up a kitchen in a store-front in town, where people can drop by and learn to cook an inexpensive and healthy meal! and a family he's working with, the obese 12 year old he's going to give a few private lessons so he can cook something on his own... sigh.... loving him!!! LOL

ps. as for Kirsti, I say follow her onTwitter, she's hilarious on that!

KforKitty
03-23-2010, 11:28 AM
I watched it too. My goodness, I was so appalled at the waste of food. Couldn't they save the fruit at least, wash it and give it to a food bank? The church family never made a vegetable or a salad? I saw a similar show from the UK, it was the same thing, nobody ate fruit or vegetables AT ALL. It blew me away.

The programme I think you refer to in the UK was made in my home town of Rotherham. I felt embarassed to be associated with the parents there. There was an outrage at one of the schools when they switched to healthy menus and a group of mums were pushing fast food through the school fence as their kids were going hungry rather than eating the new menus. What I don't get is even though many of the parents argued their kids weren't fat so why can't they eat high fat, high processed food, ignoring the fact that they were breeding a future generation of health problems due to diet.

Having had a strong campaign to improve the nutrition of school meals in the UK (led by Jamie Oliver), research has now shown that the food kids are bringing in from home is generally of poor nutritional value and high in fat and sugars. It's a hard battle to educate people especially if they just don't want to know.

Kitty

zoya417
03-23-2010, 12:28 PM
It's all about the money. The cafeteria workers don't meet once a month and plan menus together, and it's not that they don't want to work (at least not all of them). They don't get to pick the food....Here one lady picks the menu and she's charged with making sure the cafeteria MAKES money...so she picks cheap and fast stuff that kids will buy. Kids who bring their lunches don't buy at school - hence the potato wedges and pizza in my post above.

I didn't mean across the board, just this one group. They seemed so mad about having to cut some carrots. I know caf. workers in general work hard and do care about the kids.

WarMaiden
03-23-2010, 04:58 PM
Because of Trazey's post, I just went and watched the first episode online: http://abc.go.com/watch/jamie-olivers-food-revolution/250784/254757/episode-101?cid=fullepisodeaccess

Wow. Pretty shocking. Yes, I have a total crush on Jamie now. I'd take lessons from HIM ;)

My kids' school is a charter school, so they don't have school lunches. However, most of what parents send in bag lunches with their kids is complete and utter crap--ultra-processed, full of fat and sugar (Lunchables? UGH). My kids constantly complain about the food we send with them because it's NOT crap. It's a very, very difficult and continual battle. We just had a big throw-down with the kids over the weekend because of their poor attitude about the healthy food we want them to eat, and are on the verge of banning their grandparents from feeding them crap, too. (Because any time the kids get to eat crap, it seems to throw them off of their willingness to eat healthy, and that is just not OK. It makes the whole thing extra-hard for us.)

PaulaM
03-23-2010, 05:48 PM
I feel the same as the earlier poster, after watching the show it makes me want to go through my cupboards and freezer and get rid of the stuff with all the chemicals that we can't pronounce and don't even know what they are.

liv4god4evr
03-24-2010, 01:47 AM
Hi everyone! I watched the show the other night and I agree, it was a great show, and I love what Jamie Oliver is trying to do! That being said, I live in the region that the show was taped in (a few cities over), and in some ways I think it was a little unfair to the people of this state.

There is a huge problem with obesity in MANY areas of the country and it is not only in Huntington, WV. And many, many people eat highly processed foods and few vegetables. That table topped with processed foods could be found in ANY city in this country. And I truly hope that Jamie Oliver can do something to change that in this country. I would love to see a time when eating healthfully is the norm again.

As for the workers in the cafeteria, I don't know them at all, and the way the show portrayed them, they seemed like lazy, grouchy people. But in all fairness, someone they don't know (from a different COUNTRY no less), and who doesn't know the first thing about the guidelines they have to adhere to everyday is coming in and telling them they are fat and lazy, and that they are killing the kids that they work hard to feed what they believe to be "healthy, balanced meals." You can understand why they may feel a little defensive. They have done it this way for many years and they ARE within federal guidelines for child nutrition, and they really don't see any reason to change. They probably eat that type of food at home too.

I am sure that these women care very much about the children they feed, or they wouldn't be there doing a job that is very difficult, even while using shortcuts and processed food. I know because I have worked in a cafeteria in the past. I do not agree that these ladies are lazy. Cafeteria work is HARD work, and using fresh foods and whole foods does add work to an already heavy workload.

But in my opinion, that is part of the problem in this country. We have access to processed food that has lots of ingredients that we can't pronounce, but it's easier! So that is the food that we choose to place on our tables. It takes a little extra time and effort to prep fresh vegetables, and prepare tasty healthful dishes that use fresh wholesome ingredients, versus sticking a processed pizza in the oven or running through McDonalds. Many people in this country are taking the quicker, less healthy route and our children are the ones who are paying the price for it.

As a person who lives in the region, I understand maybe better that some, why people here live the way they do. They feel like this is how it has always been, and why should we change. Many of the people in this area are very poor as well, and have limited funds for food, and so therefore choose foods that have the most mass for the cheapest cost. It is cheaper to buy bologna and white bread than it is to buy boneless skinless chicken breasts, and all of the fixings for salad.

As anyone who has been obese and has lost the weight to become healthy will know, you have to decide to change! Change cannot be forced upon you or it will never be permanent. I truly hope that Jamie can help people in America to see that it is time to change! Ok time to stop writing this book :dizzy: LOL and go get me a healthy snack! ;)

Hyacinth
03-24-2010, 07:21 AM
I think the lunch ladies were a little put off by some of this, initially. I sensed their frustration about having to do it this way, and yes, school kitchen work is grueling! I do believe, like liv4god4evr stated, that they want to do right by the kids.

Here is why the processed food is easier to serve: our government gives more subsidies to meat, dairy and corn farmers than it does to farmers of leafy greens, squashes, and tomatoes. Reference: http://www.pcrm.org/magazine/gm07autumn/health_pork.html

Hiya
03-24-2010, 09:11 AM
[QUOTE=liv4god4evr;3215335]
As for the workers in the cafeteria, I don't know them at all, and the way the show portrayed them, they seemed like lazy, grouchy people. But in all fairness, someone they don't know (from a different COUNTRY no less), and who doesn't know the first thing about the guidelines they have to adhere to everyday is coming in and telling them they are fat and lazy, and that they are killing the kids that they work hard to feed what they believe to be "healthy, balanced meals." You can understand why they may feel a little defensive. They have done it this way for many years and they ARE within federal guidelines for child nutrition, and they really don't see any reason to change. They probably eat that type of food at home too."


I agree. The thing I couldn't understand was why, instead of setting himself up to fail with a *completely* different in-your-face menu, he didn't re-vision the menu the school was serving: in other words, if it's pizza on the menu, then you make *healthy, nutritionally sound* pizza with whole grain crust lots of kid-appeal grilled veggies and sure! a dash of meat/cheese....does that make sense?

It would have been a lot less confrontational and (as it turns out! All those drumsticks left over!) wasteful...

mandalinn82
03-24-2010, 11:50 AM
I agree. The thing I couldn't understand was why, instead of setting himself up to fail with a *completely* different in-your-face menu, he didn't re-vision the menu the school was serving: in other words, if it's pizza on the menu, then you make *healthy, nutritionally sound* pizza with whole grain crust lots of kid-appeal grilled veggies and sure! a dash of meat/cheese....does that make sense?

It would have been a lot less confrontational and (as it turns out! All those drumsticks left over!) wasteful...

See, I like his approach a lot more than that one (in general, I'm not a huge fan of the whole "make brownies with spinach in them/deceptively delicious and then serve them to your kids knowing they're healthy" movement). The reason being, he isn't looking to change eating habits in the SCHOOL for that MEAL, he is looking to change them for life. Faking kids out so that their unhealthy favorites are actually healthy for that meal doesn't teach them anything about what healthy food looks like in the real world, and it sends big time mixed messages (Pizza is healthy! But only if you get it in the cafeteria).

The problem with giving the kids "healthy pizza" or "healthy nuggets", etc, is that he's teaching the kids that nuggets/pizza/etc are in general good, healthy things to eat. When those kids go out into ANY other setting in that town, the lesson they've learned is "the healthy eating man taught us that pizza is OK, so I'll order pizza". And when parents use those techniques at home to "sneak in" veggies, they start pushing foods that are generally unhealthy just because they have a vegetable hidden in them. Thus you get kids whose parents push them to eat brownies because they have carrots and spinach, but since those parents are trying to "hide" the veggies from the kid, all the kid hears is "come on, eat more brownies so you grow big and strong!"

I do understand that sometimes kids don't want to eat vegetables, and I also understand that being able to make healthier versions of the food you crave is a good thing for adults...adults distinguish between "My pizza I make at home to be healthy" and "pizza not made by me" in terms of health. But kids often don't get to that level of subtlety ("the healthy food guy says pizza is good to eat" or "Mom was so happy when I ate all those chicken nuggets"), and I think at this stage, it'll be ultimately more productive to cut ties with the processed/convenience crap, even in name, and explore new tastes that will be healthier choices almost universally. If he teaches them that baked chicken legs, wild rice, and vegetables are a healthy option, that'll be a lot more likely to be true WHEREVER they go, even if he isn't designing the food.

But regardless, the chicken was wasted because this was a setup (probably so the show could demonstrate that he failed before he succeeded). It had nothing to do with the FOOD...those kids were given the choice between "familiar and comfortable" and "new and different", and most kids do gravitate toward the familiar. If there had been "pizza the old way" and "pizza the new way that looked different", the result probably would have been the same, as kids gravitated toward the comfortable stuff.

WarMaiden
03-24-2010, 12:03 PM
I pretty much agree with mandalinn. The real issue is getting kids to accept new and different foods that look like what they really are (beans, spinach, cauliflower...rather than brownies or pizza crust or whatnot). Even if Jamie had made healthy versions of their same old food, it's a very good bet that the kids would protest or not pick the new food; we deal with this constantly in my household. (One of our kids is, unfortunately, a supertaster and always knows when we try to sneak veggies past him. Faux pizza or brownies are just not an option.)

The only way to confront the issue with kids is to limit their food choices to what's healthy, and to engage in ongoing conversation/education with them about what you're doing and why. Kids from ages 6 or so up really do have the ability to understand and want to make better choices, they just need a lot of guidance and help in doing it. In fact, I would say that kids are much better at this than grownups, because kids just seem to have that natural youthful hope/optimism/idealism thing which makes them want to dive and try it out, because it's good for them / good for their families / good for the planet. (Whereas grownups mostly are jaded and cynical about this stuff.)

NiteNicole
03-24-2010, 12:15 PM
The thing I couldn't understand was why, instead of setting himself up to fail with a *completely* different in-your-face menu, he didn't re-vision the menu the school was serving: in other words, if it's pizza on the menu, then you make *healthy, nutritionally sound* pizza with whole grain crust lots of kid-appeal grilled veggies and sure! a dash of meat/cheese....does that make sense?

Don't lose sight of the fact that this is a television show for entertainment. Plot lines and characters must be established. Leading questions are asked, scenarios are put in place, editing happens. I have NO doubt that he is genuine in his efforts, but it's still television.

I am certain that the decision to put the foods "head to head" came from his production team. First, it's drama. Second, it establishes that people are resistant to change, especially the bureaucracy of schools. The food ideas we have and the guidelines we follow are well entrenched. It also makes the point that you can't really give children that age a choice and expect them NOT to choose pizza. Putting the foods head to head served a purpose.

I like the show and have had a big ol fangirl crush on Jamie Oliver for years. I'm excited to watch! I feel strongly that we are effed UP in this country with how we're eating and living. It's HARD to eat whole, healthy, REAL foods (let alone local or organic). Our lives are almost too full to fit in proper exercise. Our towns don't support a pedestrian lifestyle. Unless something very fundamental changes, we're in a lot of trouble! I hope this show is crazy popular and a lot of people really take it to heart! All that said, if he calls those women "girls" or "darlin" one more time, I fully expect one of them to belt him.

mandalinn82
03-24-2010, 12:19 PM
I think it might be awesome if at the END of the series, when the kids have a working knowledge of healthy food/eating, he asked them to help him re-envision the pizza or the nuggets or whatever. That would be a great lesson for all involved. Unfortunately, right now, those kids don't know what makes healthy food healthy, so they don't have the tools for that project.

JustBeckyV
03-24-2010, 12:36 PM
Never heard of this even - will have to search it out. I did watch Kirstie and so far not very impressed. I was amazed at what she weighed though - shows how much I know. I thought she was heavier than what she weighed.

Trazey34
03-24-2010, 01:30 PM
is it just me, or does anyone thing Kirstie fibs about her weight??? she's big big girl, and she says the most she's ever weighed is 230something, and she's tall too?? maybe just wishful thinking lol ;)

FYI Jamie's on Larry King tomorrow night, and Oprah on Friday. I might break my no-oprah rule and watch it lol

fatgirlhealthyself
03-24-2010, 02:14 PM
Really enjoying this show so far. And while you have to give the lunch ladies and everyone else the television benefit of the doubt, I can't fathom why they'd agree to do this and then dig their heels in so hard.

You can't help people who don't want to change.

The family Jamie was helping was the best part of the episode because you could see they understood how important the change was.

NiteNicole
03-24-2010, 02:17 PM
is it just me, or does anyone thing Kirstie fibs about her weight??? she's big big girl, and she says the most she's ever weighed is 230something, and she's tall too?? maybe just wishful thinking lol ;)


I didn't want to be the first one to say it, but what is the point of her going on all these shows and talking about her weight if she's not even honest about it? I remember seeing her on Oprah years ago and I forget what weight she claimed to be but no. No way. She'd have to be under five feet tall. And on her show she weighed in at 230. Again I say...I just don't think so. Not that's it's anyone's business but when you're making money by talking about your weight and telling actual numbers, why lie?

midwife
03-24-2010, 02:42 PM
Hi guys,
Just a friendly reminder about speculating about celebrities' weights:
http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/general-chatter/123899-fat-bashing-kirstie-alley-other-celebs.html

Hiya
03-24-2010, 02:55 PM
See, I like his approach a lot more than that one (in general, I'm not a huge fan of the whole "make brownies with spinach in them/deceptively delicious and then serve them to your kids knowing they're healthy" movement). The reason being, he isn't looking to change eating habits in the SCHOOL for that MEAL, he is looking to change them for life.

Hmm. If he's looking to change eating habits for life, then....I know a couple of things:

1). It was counterproductive for all those people (all those years!, lol!) getting in my face and pointing out that everything I was doing about eating was wrong, wrong, wrong and that if only I would do what they said I would be nice and thin! lol!

And if was counterproductive for me, it was probably counterproductive for you. And Alice, the lunch lady? The one with the big chip on her shoulder? Was is counterproductive for her?

Orrrr....Do we think that Alice was innocently defending "first ingredient ground beef" and slamming the box back on the table...because she couldn't read the rest of the print? (in which case, we're guilty of thinking her stupid, lol!) or maybe....she was so adamat because she already was bothered by stuff going on, but she didn't like being backed into such a public corner and she *sure* didn't like the posh accent in her face telling her she was wrong wrong wrong (even tho she maybe deep down inside sort of agreed with him).

2). Change comes in all sorts of ways.

I've hung around this site for about a month now, and the one thing I see over and over (and over, lol!) is people saying that everybody has to find ways to make the kinds of changes in their lives that will result in change over a lifetime...in their own way.


So---some people have made radical changes very quickly...others have made incremental changes.Slowly, steadily, making real improvements, but not at a blistering pace.

And I'm slowing reading my way through the maintenance library right now? Thin for Life? And all that stuff practically shouts: makes sustainable changes you can live with. Make sustainable changes you can live with.

Make sustainable changes you can live with.

So...what if the object really is for that lifetime change and Jamie's hobby horse is that the school's supposed* to cut fat by 50% and calories by the same---but the Alices of the school system end up *only* willing to cut fat and calories by 25% with a combination of processed and better foods, and they do so whinging and moaning---but they stick to it...is Alice an agent for positive change over the course of a lifetime?

mandalinn82
03-24-2010, 03:17 PM
In my experience (and probably more to the point, Jamie's experience with the school lunch program in England), teaching kids to eat healthy whole foods can be sustainable over a lifetime, particularly if you involve those kids in the entire lifecycle of the food (like some of the programs in Berkeley/Bay Area that have "pizza gardens"...kids plant the tomatoes and basil and peppers at the end of their school year, then harvest when they come back (obviously someone cares for them over the summer!) and learn how to cook with those whole ingredients). Those kids leave those programs with a variety of skills (they work math lessons into the recipes, science into the planting, etc so it fits with educational objectives), an idea of where food comes from, and at least according to the parents of kids in those programs, a greater openness to trying new foods and recipes.

1). It was counterproductive for all those people (all those years!, lol!) getting in my face and pointing out that everything I was doing about eating was wrong, wrong, wrong and that if only I would do what they said I would be nice and thin! lol!


That's not the approach I see him taking at all with the kids (and if I do see that, I'll be disappointed). With the ADULTS he does talk about what is wrong and nutrition and all that. With the kids, he's very "Look at this lovely tomato! OMG, there's a pea pod running through the school yard! Healthy food is exciting and tastes good!".

I do think he came on a little strongly with the cooks in the cafeteria, who are essentially powerless against regulations and school boards and etc to change what is served, so directing "Wrong" at them was all talk and no ability to resolve anything, which I think is really what the issue was...They have no choice about what they are feeding the kids, they do their jobs, and he is telling them they are ruining the health of future generations...of course they're going to get defensive, the only alternative is to admit "Yes, I am, I can do nothing about it, by doing my job I am hurting children" (particularly hard because most people who work in schools are passionate about and love the kids A LOT...and sometimes have to do things that aren't helpful for those kids due to policy/law/budgets).

The fat/calorie content of the food won't change too much...those things are regulated by the USDA in the Nutrient Standards for school lunches (there's a minimum calorie allowance, a maximum calorie allowance, and acceptable percentages of calories from fat). It's the INGREDIENTS he is looking to change, to get kids excited about healthy foods so that they can continue that passion as they grow up and hopefully go onto live healthier lives that incorporate real, whole foods.

I do think that as Alice and the other cooks will come around, but only after Jamie demonstrates a way that they can a) do their job including meeting all regulations AND b) provide healthy meals from whole ingredients. And then, yes, they will all be agents for positive change. Right now, they can only listen to him saying "you're bad", they do not have the district approval or flexibility to do anything about it (and I would guess that because this is television, a lot of this was either contrived or orchestrated to make them angrier...because if Jamie isn't "fighting" the school system, what sort of TV will that make? We have no idea how the idea was presented to the staff or what sort of coaching Jamie got on interacting with them, or how it was edited).

Hiya
03-25-2010, 07:59 AM
In my experience (and probably more to the point, Jamie's experience with the school lunch program in England), teaching kids to eat healthy whole foods can be sustainable over a lifetime....



That's not the approach I see him taking at all with the kids (and if I do see that, I'll be disappointed). With the ADULTS he does talk about what is wrong and nutrition and all that. With the kids, he's very "Look at this lovely tomato! OMG, there's a pea pod running through the school yard! Healthy food is exciting and tastes good!".


I must have missed the pea pod episode...the one I saw, he had little interaction with the kids and masses with the adults---and I agree, I didn't understand why he went for the powerless lunch ladies, but I *would* point out that MATTERS how we get across the "this has got to change" message to adults----because adults---parents, grandparents and yes! lunch ladies,lol! are the food gatekeepers for our (very young children), who basically eat (or not eat!) what adults give them.

And I guess my approach is different: I'd bend and scrape to get every ounce of good will and enthusiasm generated in every single adult I came across who had the power to influence what my community's children were eating: I'd rather have lunch ladies who said to the principal/school board: yeah. Carrot sticks. WE can do that, easy. Let's give them a whirl....


It's the INGREDIENTS he is looking to change, to get kids excited about healthy foods so that they can continue that passion as they grow up and hopefully go onto live healthier lives that incorporate real, whole foods.

Then he has to get the gatekeeping adults excited about the changes and willing to do the work. He mentioned that he had a vision of Alice going into other schools and showing those lunch ladies how to change....he obviously recognizes Alice's skills and knowledge and technique---so at this stage, he ought to be picking her brain for all the tools/information/abilitlies that are in the average midwest lunch lady so he can see what she knows that will work with fresh food and sailing ideas by her, presenting her with ideas to incorporate...not the other way around.

Wouldn't that make sense as a first step? To cover common ground? Agree on basic stuff?


Right now, they can only listen to him saying "you're bad", they do not have the district approval or flexibility to do anything about it...
(and I would guess that because this is television, a lot of this was either contrived or orchestrated to make them angrier...because if Jamie isn't "fighting" the school system, what sort of TV will that make? We have no idea how the idea was presented to the staff or what sort of coaching Jamie got on interacting with them, or how it was edited).

Oh, I agree. And I have to wonder----what's exactly on the plate right here (har!)? TV ratings or the food revolution?

angelskeep
03-26-2010, 10:59 PM
:yikes: I am watching the Jamie Oliver show now and I am horrified at what the school children on the program were eating. And it is incomprehensible to me that they don't know the difference between an eggp0lant, a tomato, and a potato. And how to use silverware. Good grief! Wherever will we find the rocket scientists of tomorrow? Will we have to import them from third world countries? Very sad to me to see the state of our children. :yikes:

Barb

pinkprincess
03-27-2010, 08:39 AM
I found this show great to watch too. I didn't think of the lunch room ladies as being rude, they just felt overwhelmed and didn't think they could cook like Jamie was asking them to. I found the school's food disgusting and would imagine most schools serve the same food. It made me think about my food, too.

PaulaM
03-27-2010, 12:27 PM
Last night's show was a real eye opener. I was stunned that the kids couldn't identify vegetables or use a knife and fork. That gives you the impression that none of them are eating "real" meals at home, everybody just eating McDonald's and pizza. The family he is helping from the church I believe is already cheating, fast food drinks, the little girl said they had pizza, vegetables left in the fridge. This shows how hard it is to get people to change their habits.

WarMaiden
03-27-2010, 04:18 PM
I watched both episodes online this morning with my 9-year-old son, my husband was listening in as well. Very fun and educational. At one point I made a comment about kids eating "white bread," and my son piped up, "What's white bread?" LOL!

kaplods
03-27-2010, 04:34 PM
One of the most dangerous diet myths (and unfortunately one of the most common) is that early "cheating" is a sign or proof of failure and unwilliness to change.

I think too much is being made of the family "cheating already." It makes good television to ask a family to drastically and suddenly change their diet, but it doesn't make good sense psychologically or emotionally. Even if they prepared and ate only half of the meals (heck if they only prepared and ate the food for two days out of the seven), that would likely be enough to see some major health improvements over the long haul. It's not ideal, but it really is a gopod start.

I hope that IS being communicated, because if only their failure at being perfect is stressed, the family may assume the situation is hopeless, rather than feeling they're making progress and can build on that.


I think it is ironic that the "fattest" people on the show are the least resistant to the prospect of change (even seen in the shots of the parents reactions to the schools tarp o' crap and the truckload of animal fat. It's the fat folks that are nodding, and it's the thin folks who are shaking their heads, rolling their eyes). If you watch the fattst folks, you see them nodding, and paying attention, whereas the thin and only moderately overweight folks are the most (or most portrayed as being) hostile and argumentative. It's as though they feel that because they're not morbidly obese, the advice doesn't apply to them, as if they're immune to diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure stroke because they don't weigh 300 lbs.

I think there's still a strong tendency for people to believe that if a food is bad for them, they would immediately feel sick. If they're near or at a healthy weight, have no obvious health problems, and don't feel sick all of the time, they must be healthy (and of course they're not going to doctors so there's no evidence to the contrary).


It's an interesting show. One of the first "reality" shows that I've been tempted to watch in a long time.

kaplods
03-27-2010, 05:03 PM
I know the lunch ladies, didn't like being called that, but I can't help it. Growing up (and even now) that's all I've ever heard them being called, even when my mom worked in my sisters' school cafeterial. When asked what she did, she said "I'm a lunch lady at my daughters' school").

I found it incredibly odd that the lunch ladies reacted in such shock to the suggestion that the kids, especially the kindergarteners be given knives, and their disbelief that knives were given to school children in Brittain. I found it really crazy that they usually weren't even given forks - only spoons.

When I was a kid, we did have real silverware and there were butter/dinner knives, forks, and spoons of real metal. Heck I remember my mom would send me to school with a paring knife or steak knife in my lunch box sometimes. I'm pretty sure it was no later than second grade (I had a long lunchbox in third grade, and I remember that a steak knife fit, but only the paring knife fit in the previous year's square metal lunch box).

I was helping in the kitchen and using a "real" knife very early, because I was making full meals for the family, by myself by 9 or 10. I remember in 5th grade taking a "cooking class" in school, and I was very didsappointed, becaue I knew how to make everything that we were going to learn (except a pie crust from scratch).

mandalinn82
03-27-2010, 05:05 PM
Then he has to get the gatekeeping adults excited about the changes and willing to do the work. He mentioned that he had a vision of Alice going into other schools and showing those lunch ladies how to change....he obviously recognizes Alice's skills and knowledge and technique---so at this stage, he ought to be picking her brain for all the tools/information/abilitlies that are in the average midwest lunch lady so he can see what she knows that will work with fresh food and sailing ideas by her, presenting her with ideas to incorporate...not the other way around.


I think my point was that the whole thing with the cooks was overblown, because they really aren't the gatekeepers...the school system/administrators are. The menus come down from higher up.

It will be really interesting to see how this progresses as the show goes on!

brandy922
03-27-2010, 06:52 PM
I watched this morning and was so grossed out by his chicken nugget demonstration to the kids that i almost puked. I can't believe that after showing them what went into a chicken nugget and how they were made the kids still ate them. :barf: On the bright side, I had my 7 year old watch that part and he told me he would never eat another chicken nugget unless I made them for him with real chicken.

Mikayla
03-27-2010, 07:43 PM
I watched both episodes last night. I loved the show, I can clearly remember loving chicken nugget day at school. And I was very much like the processed food family not all that long ago. Although I was still in shock at how often she fried things, I mean she was making donuts in her home on a regular basis, that was shocking to me.

I think the concept is a good one, people should be eating more whole foods period. I think the movement pushing towards that way of eating should be a big one.

zoya417
03-29-2010, 01:16 AM
I am disgusted that they have a great show like this one, teaching people about eating healthy and then the commercials for fast food come on. That makes no sense, during this one show could they not sell ad time to other companies.

Jldsgirl
03-29-2010, 08:25 AM
The one that KILLS ME the most is Friday lunch. Uncrustables. Those FROZEN things in the breakfast freezer section of the grocery store. Seriously? For lunch?

This was a main dish "choice" at my daughter's previous school EVERY DAY!!! Would it really be that difficult to whip up a few pb&j's by hand?

I find the school lunches disgusting. But unfortunately, my family is one who depends on the free lunch program...
I love what Jamie is doing, and I truly hope that he opens the eyes of those in charge of this country's school lunch programs.

paris81
03-29-2010, 09:29 AM
What I like about Jamie is that he doesn't talk too much, that I noticed, about weight to the kids. I'm specifically thinking of the 6th grade boy in the family he's working with . He talks about learning to cook, learning a skill, eating fresh, good tasting food, but he doesn't say anything about losing weight or "looking hot". So it does really seem to be more about health than apperance.

However, he does sometimes, especially with the cooks at the school, come off as abrasive, and I'm wondering how long the show will last because I'm skeptical of American's willingness to tune in every week to watch a Brit tell them what to do. Granted, this is addressed, which I think is a good thing, I could see a resistance. I wonder how the ratings are. I'm not surprised that the show is popular on this forum--but I wonder about how he rates with the overall population.

That being said, I think what he's doing is great, but he needs to be careful as to how he goes about doing it--food and losing weight are touchy subjects, plus the fact that he's not American...I can see people resisting to him as "not being one of us" (as they do in the show!)