Beck Diet Solution - Day 13 (pink book): Overcome cravings




silverbirch
01-27-2010, 05:11 PM
I mentioned this in the monthly thread and time priorities mean I've only just been able to post.

I was struggling with this as 'mindset' and 'craving' meant nothing very much to me. A problem of language and culture? Over-analysis on my part? Whether I relaxed or concentrated, this chapter did not speak to me.

So I've decided that's OK. I've given the chapter a chance or two. I've read it with respect. I've waited. No sabotaging thoughts.

And I've moved on.

Any comments?

For reference, Beck writes about two sets of techniques.

Techniques to develop the anti-craving mindset

1. Label it
2. Stand firm
3. Don't give yourself a choice
4. Imagine the aftermath of giving in
5. Remind yourself why you want to learn to withstand cravings

Behavioural techniques

1. Distance yourself from the food you crave
2. Drink something with low or no calories
3. Relax
4. Distract yourself.


patchworkpenguin
01-27-2010, 06:33 PM
At the time I read this chapter, it didn't say much to me either. I liked the instructions on how to resist a 'craving/desire to eat' and copied them onto a card, for when I needed them. I was excited to put them into practice, but hadn't been tempted by anything off my plan or menu.

Several weeks later, I needed them. However, I still keep forgetting I have them, and to use them. Maybe I need to post these on the fridge also. :o

We may never need some of Beck's techniques, but its nice to know they are there; like a spare tire. Hope that helped.

silverbirch
01-28-2010, 02:48 AM
Thank you, Penguin. :wave:

That is very helpful, especially the spare tyre analogy. So check the card* from time to time just as we check the spare tyre from time to time.

(*ETA that actually I keep my Beck 'cards' on my BlackBerry.)


BillBlueEyes
01-28-2010, 05:29 AM
I'm not much help since I don't seem to have Cravings - I fall for the Desire thing.

But I really like the idea of Beck's strategies being like a spare tire - there for when we need them. Even needing to check it periodically to know it's there.

Ruthxxx
01-28-2010, 06:02 AM
Bill, I'm glad you said that. I don't have cravings either. Sometimes I nibble without thinking but thats seems to have abated.

silverbirch
01-28-2010, 06:53 AM
Yes, that's part of it for me. I just don't have cravings but I do occasionally have desire. And that's possible to work into life, IMHO.

My other sticking point was 'mindset' but I think just that's a semi-technical term which doesn't resonate with me.

Mahalia
01-28-2010, 08:58 AM
Maybe as a craver I can help. There's a coffee shop a block away from me that has this amazing muffin. It's dipped in butter and rolled in cinnamon and sugar. I don't know how many calories it has and I can't even think about it.

But for whatever reason, probably because I used to eat one occasionally, I get a craving. And that's all I can think about.

So one way to resolve the craving is to go get one, then I will stop thinking about it. But if I remind myself how bad I will feel if I do that, and distract myself with something else, and hour or so later the craving has passed and I'm always glad to have resisted.

silverbirch
01-28-2010, 04:47 PM
Thank you, Mahalia, for spelling this out to me. Yes, I've got the picture clearly now and no, I definitely don't have that.

Well done for wrestling that craving to the floor. Sounds as though you've got the upper hand most of the time.

Thank you too, everyone else. As someone in my past used to say (and I can't remember who, for the life of me), 'Ask if you've got a question because at least one other person will want to know.' Always found that to be true.

midlifecrisis57
01-28-2010, 11:31 PM
SB of Wales,
I thought it was an interesting chapter because its the first one I recall Bec clarifying both COGNITIVE (mindset) ways of talking back to a craving and BEHAVIOURAL (physical directions) to sidestep a craving. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy. (I spelt behaviour just for you!) I think the other chapters could be categorized as cognitive and behavioural suggestions, too, but I haven't separated them.

silverbirch
01-29-2010, 08:10 AM
SB of Wales,
I thought it was an interesting chapter because its the first one I recall Bec clarifying both COGNITIVE (mindset) ways of talking back to a craving and BEHAVIOURAL (physical directions) to sidestep a craving. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy. (I spelt behaviour just for you!) I think the other chapters could be categorized as cognitive and behavioural suggestions, too, but I haven't separated them.

Thank U! I appreciate ur thought.

And thanks for pointing out the cognitive bit. My own cognition does not always fire on these cold mornings. ;)

DuckyChick
04-10-2010, 09:14 AM
I realize that this is an ancient thread, and I haven't gotten to this chapter yet, but if I understand what you've told us correctly, I think I can shed some light on the subject. As a compulsive eater, my relationship with food has obsessive components to it as well. For example, say that I know that the fixings for my #1 trigger food are in the house (nachos, fyi. *grin*). I can't think about anything else but nachos. My mouth is watering, but I've recently eaten and my body is physically not hungry. I call it "mouth hunger" or "mind hunger" vs. REAL hunger. It can get to the point where I can think of nothing else but that trigger food. From what I can see, this chapter helps us deal with those kind of cravings if they're a problem for us.

Hope this helps!