Dieting with Obstacles - Thyroid lab results ?




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mom4life
01-20-2010, 01:48 PM
TSH 0.46 (0.40-4.50)
Free T4 1.0 (0.8-1.8)
T3 Free 269 (230-420)
T3 Uptake 27 (22-35)
Thyroid Peroxidase antibodies <10 (<35)

What do you think, do they look normal?


kaplods
01-20-2010, 02:28 PM
TSH 0.46 (0.40-4.50)
Free T4 1.0 (0.8-1.8)
T3 Free 269 (230-420)
T3 Uptake 27 (22-35)
Thyroid Peroxidase antibodies <10 (<35)

What do you think, do they look normal?


This looks like the format of the reports I get from my doctor. If so, the first number is your number and the numbers in parenthesis are considered to be normal. So yes all your numbers appear to fall within the normal range, on the low side.

What did your doctor tell you?

Sskar
01-20-2010, 02:44 PM
They look normal to me. TSH is the most meaningful one - it shows how your pituitary gland is responding to the levels of thyroid hormone in your blood. High TSH means circulating thyroid hormone is low; low TSH means thyroid hormone in your blood is high. Low levels of TSH, however, can also mean your pituitary gland isn't working properly. So.... lab results always have to be interpreted along with your history and symptoms. Are you on thyroid medication already?


Meg
01-20-2010, 02:45 PM
Your results look normal. :) The low TSH actually means you're almost HYPERthyroid, so you're a long way from being hypothyroid (having an underactive thyroid). TSH measures Thyroid Stimulating Hormone, and it's high TSH numbers that indicate an underactive thyroid because more and more TSH is being pumped out to try to stimulate a sluggish thyroid. A low (but not abnormally low) TSH, like you have, indicates a normally functioning thyroid. Good news!

mom4life
01-20-2010, 02:46 PM
My midwife told me I should see a specialist because even though they are in normal range they're on the low side. I called an Endo, when the front desk girl asked for the results I told her about the TSH and she thought it was low.
I'm thinking but not sure that the T3 Free is on the low side too.

mom4life
01-20-2010, 02:49 PM
I'm not on any meds. There's still the issue of a possible lump on my thyroid. Now my midwife questions if its on the thyroid or not but suggested I get that checked out too to be on the safe side.

Meg
01-20-2010, 02:51 PM
I know it's confusing, but low TSH is good. Low TSH does not mean underactive or low thyroid -- quite the opposite. A high TSH would indicate a problem with your thyroid.

Your TSH is right about where my doctor wants me to be with my Synthroid doses.

High TSH = hypothryoidism (underactive or slow thyroid)

Unusually low TSH = hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid)

mom4life
01-20-2010, 02:58 PM
TSH done a week prior to this one showed it at 0.07

Meg
01-20-2010, 03:01 PM
You would definitely want to get the 0.07 result checked out further. That number indicates an abnormally overactive thyroid. I had heart palpitations and couldn't sleep when my TSH was that low (my Synthroid dose needed to be adjusted). I'm glad you're going to see an endo. :)

Sskar
01-20-2010, 03:22 PM
Rachel, I didn't notice your signature the first time that shows you are pregnant!

(You need to see a physician, but I'm going to speak from my M.D. background now. DO NOT TAKE THIS AS MEDICAL ADVICE.) The thyroid gland and actual thyroid functioning change during normal pregnancy. Detection of thyroid lumps (nodules) during pregnancy are not uncommon because of this - plus the fact women are seeing health care providers so frequently. Your tests do not show any sign of thyroiditis, which is an autoimmune, inflammatory condition that can pop up in pregnancy. Usually the nodules in pregnancy are benign (not malignant) and are due to increased growth of normal tissue - but this does need to be confirmed.

Your midwife is doing the right thing by sending you to an endocrinologist.

Aurora
01-24-2010, 10:52 AM
Just to give an example for what Meg is describing:
I was diagnosed hypothyroid, with a TSH level of 16.5.
My coworker has under-active thyroid, with a TSH of 5.0. At this level, it has to be watched but not treated.
After 6 weeks on meds, my TSH was low (0.4) so they reduced my dose.

But definitely go to the doc for lumps. And good luck with your baby!

wannabesomebody
02-27-2010, 04:58 AM
actually tsh is the least important number as it doesn't show what your thyroid is doing at all just what your pituitary thinks is going on.

Your levels look normal.

Sskar
02-27-2010, 08:36 PM
Actually, TSH is the most important number as it is the most sensitive indicator of how your thyroid is functioning in the feedback loop between pituitary gland and thyroid. Pituitary releases TSH in response to thyroid levels in the blood, which in turn acts on thyroid gland to release thyroid hormone.

Simplified explanation on the way from my simple brain:
High TSH means there is not enough circulating thyroid hormone in the blood, so the pituitary gland is pumping out more Thyroid Stimulating Hormone to make your thyroid put out more thyroid hormone. Low TSH means either your pituitary isn't working (unusual cause), drug interaction, or there is too much thyroid hormone in your blood, and the pituitary gland is releasing lower levels to tell the thyroid to stop producing so much.

Things can get more complicated in pregnancy, with medication, and other situations such as thyroid nodules.

wannabesomebody
02-27-2010, 09:04 PM
Sorry sskar but this is completely and utterly FALSE. TSH has very little relavance to your actual thyroid health and any thyroid center will say that. You're pituitary gland does not SHOW exactly what your THYROID gland is doing. Especially with someone with hashis these numbers are to be completely TRASHED as hashis makes it bounce around. That's why people say go by how you feel not the stupid tsh number. It does NOT say how much t3 you have which is the hormone you actually USE. It does not say how if the message is even GETTING to your thyroid by not saying how much T4 it has.

FT4 and FT3 are the most important numbers. What if a person has reverse t3 conversion problems? What if they have tons of T4 and it's not converting to t3? Also if you take your med before a test it will skew the results.

The tsh is an absolute BS number and any doctor that goes by it when a person has symptoms should be fired and have his liscence pulled.

LabMonkeyGirl
02-28-2010, 12:30 AM
Sorry sskar but this is completely and utterly FALSE. TSH has very little relavance to your actual thyroid health and any thyroid center will say that. You're pituitary gland does not SHOW exactly what your THYROID gland is doing. Especially with someone with hashis these numbers are to be completely TRASHED as hashis makes it bounce around. That's why people say go by how you feel not the stupid tsh number. It does NOT say how much t3 you have which is the hormone you actually USE. It does not say how if the message is even GETTING to your thyroid by not saying how much T4 it has.

FT4 and FT3 are the most important numbers. What if a person has reverse t3 conversion problems? What if they have tons of T4 and it's not converting to t3? Also if you take your med before a test it will skew the results.

The tsh is an absolute BS number and any doctor that goes by it when a person has symptoms should be fired and have his liscence pulled.

I had hyperthyroidism and radioactive iodine here. At first, the doctor checked my TSH (as per a routine physical). It was very, very low, indicating a hyperthyroid state. Then he tested my T3 and T4. They may have tested TSH, T3, and T4--and sometimes only TSH, and this was through 2 different endocrinologists at the top medical universities in two different parts of the country. None of their licenses were revoked. I got radioactive iodine, and now, only my TSH is monitored. TSH is not simply a BS number.

From thyroid.org--yes, it says INITIAL way to test thyroid function. But still, TSH is not B.S.!

TSH Tests
The best way to initially test thyroid function is to measure the TSH level in a blood sample. A high TSH level indicates that the thyroid gland is failing because of a problem that is directly affecting the thyroid (primary hypothyroidism). The opposite situation, in which the TSH level is low, usually indicates that the person has an overactive thyroid that is producing too much thyroid hormone (hyperthyroidism). Occasionally, a low TSH may result from an abnormality in the pituitary gland, which prevents it from making enough TSH to stimulate the thyroid (secondary hypothyroidism). In most healthy individuals, a normal TSH value means that the thyroid is functioning normally.

RynKay
02-28-2010, 01:05 AM
Your pituitary gland secrets a hormone(TSH=thyroid stimulating hormone) that tells your thyroid when to secrete its hormone.
(Your thyroid maintains you metabolism and body temperature)

If you TSH levels are low, it would actually mean your metabolism is higher.

BECAUSE if your pituitary gland sees your thyroid isnt doing its job, then it produces HIGHER levels of TSH to tell the thyroid to pick up the slack.
(and vice versa)

Sskar
02-28-2010, 01:31 AM
Sorry sskar but this is completely and utterly FALSE. TSH has very little relavance to your actual thyroid health and any thyroid center will say that.

I will not be drawn in to medical arguments on this forum (or turn in my medical license).

Extensive links from the National Institutes of Health on thyroid disease here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/thyroiddiseases.html#cat5

Meg
02-28-2010, 05:23 AM
Sskar's right, we're fat chicks, not doctors. If you think you have a thyroid issue or if you think it's not correctly regulated, talk to your doctor. :)