100 lb. Club - I Say I Want to Lose Weight But Can't Stay on my Plan?




VickieLou
01-12-2010, 12:06 PM
I say I want to lose Weight but can't stay on my plan? I joined about 5 challenges, I have a gym membership, lots of workout tapes and exercise equipment, but having problem with overeating. Does anyone have a reason why I do this? It's like I want to overeat and lose weight but can't do that.
How do you get back on track? :?:


stargzr
01-12-2010, 12:18 PM
I had this problem when I started... I think that in my mind I really thought that what I was doing wasn't as bad as it was. What got me in the groove was tracking my calories on thedailyplate. I didn't realize I was eating so much and it helped me to see the bigger picture. After that, it was really, really difficult to slow down my eating, but I set my mind to it and just kept at it. It's something I still have to remind myself sometimes.

Kae
01-12-2010, 12:20 PM
It sounds like you have the right tools to be successful... now you just need to do it. Start small... track your calories... once you do that for a while, see where you can improve and incorporate more healthy food choices... then maybe throw in some exercise.


Eliana
01-12-2010, 12:31 PM
I think you need to be really strict with yourself for a set amount of time depending on what plan you're striving for. For South Beach, a week indoctrinated me pretty well. With calorie counting it took three weeks. But after that time period, for me, it's smooth sailing. Have you kicked sugar to the curb? Quitting sugar cold turkey takes away cravings for me and relatively quickly. Try eating more frequent, scheduled meals so you know that yes, you're hungry, but your next meal is never more than 2.5 hours away. Pre plan what you are going to eat the day before.

I know you know all this. ;) Now it's time to recommit and put it into action. I've been where you are with one toe hanging in. It's time to start over and start over for real with the same zealous attitude newbies have. You need to be a newbie again.

knobhdy
01-12-2010, 12:36 PM
I totally understand you. I have been saying I want to loose weight for almost 10 years and yet it is still and on again off again, up again down again situation.
I don't yo-yo diet, but I loose motivation to journal and exercise and then I just fall off. Remembering to post here helps, but isn't enough for me as I have been languishing since last spring.
Hopefully others will have good suggestions.

diabetic z
01-12-2010, 12:39 PM
VickieLou, I can relate. The past two months during the holidays were really tough for me. Lax dieting and too many days off from exercise placed me firmly on a plateau. It wasn't until I recently recommitted and focused on my dieting and exercise that I started to lose again. Hang in there. Take it one meal at a time, one day at a time, and one pound at a time. Slow and steady wins the race.

PeanutsMom704
01-12-2010, 12:57 PM
What about trying to give up one specific food that you know you eat too much of? You don't need to change EVERYTHING all at once, but just stopping chocolate or ice cream or something would be a good first step and help you realize you do have more control over what you eat than you can see right now.

LizR
01-12-2010, 01:06 PM
I had this problem at first too. One thing that really helps me is that every night I write an eating plan for the next day. I set out the food or ingredients or recipe in a special place in the kitchen to make it as easy as possible to stick with the plan.

I also switched to a high protein, low fat, low carb diet with no refined sugar. I am not nearly as hungry on this diet. Everyone's body is different so this may not work as well for you.

At dinner I make a recipe that is good for the whole family and then I make side dishes that are higher in calories for my kids. This way the diet feels more natural.

Good luck. Keep trying and keep posting. You will get there.

rockinrobin
01-12-2010, 01:27 PM
I say I want to lose Weight but can't stay on my plan? I joined about 5 challenges, I have a gym membership, lots of workout tapes and exercise equipment, but having problem with overeating. Does anyone have a reason why I do this? It's like I want to overeat and lose weight but can't do that.
How do you get back on track? :?:

Wanting to lose weight and WILLING to do what is necessary are two different things. Your title says that you WANT to lose weight, but that is sadly not enough. You MUST be WILLING to make a change. You must be WILLING to what is necessary, what is required. You've got to be WILLING to say no to this and yes to that. Be willing to plan ahead. To stay within a calorie allotment. To have the right foods on hand and get rid of the *wrong* ones. You've got to be willing to change - once and for all and permanently.

Your desire to be thin, slim, trim, fit and healthy MUST outweigh, overtake and overpower your desire for the high calorie/high quantity foods. It can't occur any other way. You have to want this, really, really badly.

People ask me all the time how I lost so much weight when they can't even lose 10 lbs. I tell them that I DECIDED to. I had always *wanted* to, but then one day I just DECIDED to. Upon deciding to to lose the weight, I therefore had to COMMIT to lose the weight. It's that commitment, that ironclad commitment that gives you that stick-to-it-ness.

Decide what it is you want the MOST in life and then resolve to pay *the price* to get it done. We ALL have the ABILITY to lose weight. It's all a choice that we make. We choose to be heavy and we can then choose to not be and to remain that way. Losing weight and lots of it is doable for anyone and everyone - yourself included, if that's what you TRULY want and you are willing to make and keep the changes that are necessary to make it happen. :hug:

dragonwoman64
01-12-2010, 01:52 PM
ho boy, do I get you. the exercise for me is easy, and I'm good at staying on plan most of the time, but I still reach for food when I'm stressed, or as a treat. even after all I've lost. I've gotten much better, turning to other things to deal with stress, and taking care of myself in other ways than eating. I lose more through my tenacity than my (non) iron will.

I figure while I work on the iron will, I'll take what I can get from the tenacity.

so, what I do is identify and work on my weak spots, and keep plugging away at it. my will, my habits, my mindset, they've all changed as I've worked on this. I have no intention of stopping until I reach my goal.

ubergirl
01-12-2010, 02:23 PM
I say I want to lose Weight but can't stay on my plan? I joined about 5 challenges, I have a gym membership, lots of workout tapes and exercise equipment, but having problem with overeating. Does anyone have a reason why I do this? It's like I want to overeat and lose weight but can't do that.
How do you get back on track? :?:

Well, yes. This was me for almost 30 years.

I had the knowledge, the tools and the desire, but I could not stay on a plan for more than a few days....

I always thought I had some kind of psychological quirk that made it impossible for me to control myself.

Sadly, I FINALLY had to realize that though I though I wanted it, I did not want it badly enough to give up food.

That's what I had to do. I had to decide that it was more important to me to lose weight than it was to keep eating whatever I wanted whenever I wanted.

I was a compulsive overeater/binge eater/stress eater/emotional eater what-have-you.

That's kind of the good news and the bad news at the same time. If it's a compulsion, it's like a super bad habit... and I truly believe that those habits are completely fixable. If you suck it up and ride out the beginning white-knuckle you will find to your shock and surprise that it becomes MUCH easier.

I remember once, long ago, when I was attending sessions with drug addicts as part of my education, and in group therapy the addicts used to sit around and talk about how there was a part of them that mourned giving up the drug and that part of why they used was because they ENJOYED it.

I, not being a druggie, could not relate to that at all. I thought drugs were disgusting and why would anyone make themselves suffer like that???

Well, I suffered plenty from being morbidly obese. But, food was the crutch that go me through my day.

Now, I have to stand on my own two feet and suck it up, boredom, stress, frustration, celebration. It's all just me.

You CAN stay on your plan if you really decide that that's how you want to live your life.

We will all encourage you here.

Nada
01-12-2010, 02:43 PM
How do you get back on track? The perennial question. I sounds like you are trying to motivate yourself through committing yourself to challenges and gym membership and sometime that works very well. But it is not doing it for you right now. You have been given advice on two different approaches: get on your eating plan and hang on until the cravings diminish or move into it slowly. Depending on your personality and circumstances either will work. My own preference is to change one habit at a time and accept that my weight loss will be slooooooooow. When I feel myself slipping (as I have over the last 3 weeks), I just change one thing and keep that up until it's a habit and then concentrate on something else.

Good luck, coming here is always a good first step.

cfmama
01-12-2010, 03:16 PM
sign my name to RockinRobins post... I just DECIDED that I was not going to be fat any more and I would do WHATEVER it took to make that happen.

19Deltawifey
01-12-2010, 03:27 PM
When my calories were really low I found it hard to stay on track but once I upped my calaories its so easy to stay in the calorie range, Im eating enough food to where I don't feel deprived or anything. Try upping your calories and see if it gets easier to stay on plan. Good Luck

BeachBreeze2010
01-12-2010, 03:35 PM
Do you truly believe that permanent weight loss is possible and that you deserve it? I ask because I think I forgot this at points in my life. I wanted to lose weight, but I wanted the junk food more because I forgot that there was a real reward for skipping it. You don't just go without the junk, you go with a new you. That new you will absolutely happen. It's not just about denying something, it's about getting something back that's HUGE - YOU!

kaplods
01-12-2010, 03:36 PM
You might consider whether WHAT you're eating is working against your willpower. Some of us find that what we eat, changes how we lose, and how well we're able to stick to our food plan.

I have no more willpowerthan I did when I was much younger (in fact, I think I have far less), and yet I'm being far more successful (in the long run, even though I'm losing far slower, because I'm putting in so much less effort - and because of health problems that interfere even further). In weight loss, I was a sprinter (and I took off a lot of time between races), not a long-distance hiker.


I know a lot of people will tell you it doesn't matter what you eat, that as long as you burn more than you take in - you'll lose.

Heck, I even believe that - but the problem is I suspect I burn a lot more on certain foods than others. There could be a lot of reasons for that, and it doesn't matter. When I eat the foods I lose weight on and don'nt binge on, I lose weight. For me that means a relatively low carb diet (which alone tends to keep me from gaining, I need to do more to lose weight though, because overeating lean meat is still overeating), so I use a portion control plan (a calorie-controlled exchange plan) as a back-up. When I'm on plan, I lose weight. When I don't follow the plan, I don't.


I'm not saying any of this is true for you. Just suggesting you might consider a lower GL diet, or a lower carb diet and see if that helps.

For nearly 3 decades I asked myself (and counselors too) why I ate so much and couldn't stick to a diet. They had a lot of suggestions, but none of them suggested what turned out to be true. When I eat high carb foods, especially refined sugars and carbs, followed by unrefined grains, and to some degree fruits, I am hungrier. The less healthy the food, the hungrier I get. To lose weight, I need to manage hunger - and for me, that means limiting high carb foods, even some of the healthy ones (I may be able to add them back in later, and maybe not - either way I'll be fine as long as I adapt, and keep doing what works).

But, like any other weightloss plan. You've got to be willing to do what works, to make it work. I'm still working on that. It's hard to wrap my head around the fact that there are healthy foods I shouldn't eat, even though they're healthy for people who won't overeat them or in response to them.

ubergirl
01-12-2010, 04:01 PM
When I eat high carb foods, especially refined sugars and carbs, followed by unrefined grains, and to some degree fruits, I am hungrier. The less healthy the food, the hungrier I get. To lose weight, I need to manage hunger - and for me, that means limiting high carb foods, even some of the healthy ones (I may be able to add them back in later, and maybe not - either way I'll be fine as long as I adapt, and keep doing what works).

This is very much true for me, except that "hungrier" for me really means "cravey-er". I don't think I'm actually physically hungrier, but I can't take my mind off of food and once I start into that "should I or shouldn't I" battle with myself, then I'm lost.

I spent all weekend at work this past weekend and there was a huge basket of chocolates in the break room. It was a perfect set up for me to binge-- everyone of my triggers: unsupervised sweets, a large enough quantity that I could eat a bunch and no one would see exactly how much I had eaten, and there was nobody in the break room (my bad habit was to eat when nobody could see me). I could have eaten 50 of them. In the past, I would have. But not that I just don't eat that stuff, I never had one, and I also never had to fight of the craving, because that "should I or shouldn't I?" thing never got a chance to set up shop.

Some people don't seem to struggle with this problem, but I sure do.

cathydoe
01-12-2010, 04:20 PM
Wow...I can relate. The question or statement that got me was...Is it more painful to stay overweight or to (as Robin says) suck it up & stop overeating.
I was like a teenager (in my mind) I wanted to eat what I wanted when I wanted. And I did. And I weighed over 250 lbs. I didn't want to be hungry.

Somehow in November I sucked it up...I felt the pain of NOT EATING...I felt the pain of hunger. And I lived. And I am learning to eat to live v.s. to live to eat.

My mom always told me I could do whatever I wanted if I put my mind to it. And that used to pi$$ me off! Because I had made up my mind a trillion times to loose weight. BUT I wasn't willing to do what I needed to do. And my list of things I need to do to loose weight is long. And I can do it. Thanks in part to 3FC. You can do it too!

SNMomof1
01-12-2010, 04:38 PM
I think you have to feel and BELIEVE you can be healthier. And get rid of the junk in your cabinets! Clear everything out so there's no temptation.

rockinrobin
01-12-2010, 07:10 PM
Wow...I can relate. The question or statement that got me was...Is it more painful to stay overweight or to (as Robin says) suck it up & stop overeating.


suck it up and stop overeating? I've said lots of things over the years, but I can't recall saying THAT one. But I do agree that it is most definitely more painful and more difficult to stay overweight than it is to stop overeating. It took me a long time to come to that conclusion. I finally figured that it HAD to be easier to eat *correctly* than to remain super morbidly obese.

cathydoe
01-12-2010, 07:29 PM
suck it up and stop overeating? I've said lots of things over the years, but I can't recall saying THAT one. But I do agree that it is most definitely more painful and more difficult to stay overweight than it is to stop overeating. It took me a long time to come to that conclusion. I finally figured that it HAD to be easier to eat *correctly* than to remain super morbidly obese.

Sorry Robin...I thought I read somewhere that you said something about "suck it up" Sorry for writing your name in there...your words are always so encouraging to me!

Sskar
01-12-2010, 09:33 PM
I'll throw in my reply by saying that relapsing is the norm, but no excuse not to get back on plan. Learn from what derailed you this time so you will be more observant and ready for the future.

Here are some suggestions for now:
> Reaffirm your goals - long and short term - and commit to them. Write them down. Maybe do it here or in a blog or in a private journal.
> Be very specific about what your plan involves, i.e. eating, physical activity, self-monitoring, etc. Write these down also.
> Keep a list of motivating statements/reasons about why you are on this life style change.
> Keep up your self-confidence in your ability to stay on plan (or get back OP) with strong support from here, family, friends - especially pay attention to those like you who are being and have been successful (check out the maintainers forum for inspiration)
> Learn what your triggers are for getting off your plan and develop methods for overcoming them.

We have all been where you are. Keep reading and writing and talking and working.

Peace.

marigrace
01-12-2010, 10:34 PM
I have been there, so many times, it is not a good place, and I never want to go back. I know it is hard, but really, the alternative is so much worst. Give yourself some structure and stick with it. Know that this is what you need to do to, and think of it as taking care of yourself. In 3 or 4 days you will see that it does get easier... and later, if you slip again sometime (and we all do) ask why and how and try to learn from it and move on...fast. If you really want the pay off you have to make a real commitment to yourself.

PS: I think Kaplods may be on to something with trying low glycemic.

rockinrobin
01-12-2010, 10:45 PM
Sorry Robin...I thought I read somewhere that you said something about "suck it up" Sorry for writing your name in there...your words are always so encouraging to me!

No need to apologize. I DO say a LOT of things, it would be difficult to keep it straight. ;)

NebraskaLady
01-13-2010, 12:14 AM
My son, being an alcoholic could not take one drink out of a beer and then leave the rest of the bottle just sitting there. Neither can I just eat one piece of candy or snack food and just leave the rest sitting there. So, the only way for me is to not have anything like that in the house. I have always been an impluse eater. The thought of eating something hits my mind and instantly goes down my throat and then I would kick myself for eating it. I could spend an hour making out the perfect menu for the next day, get up, eat what I had written down for breakfast then be off and running, eating everything in sight for the rest of the day. What I've found that works for me is, as soon as I eat my breakfast, I go write down what I have eaten. Then when I eat lunch, I go write it down and the same for supper. On the ocassions that I have eaten things that I shouldn't have, I still write it down. I really think that's what's kept me going for this long because it is so tempting to just way, oh well, I blew it and not write it down. But when I have to humble myself and write down what I ate and then total up the calories, it's made me totally accountable for my actions.

Lori Bell
01-13-2010, 10:00 AM
I think that I waited so long to take that final plunge to get fit because I just *knew* that if I had so much trouble making it through the first few days, how in the **** was I going to maintain it? I've lost weight lots of times, but for me the most depressing and mentally debilitating part of the entire process was when I would start rapidly regaining it. I would become a recluse because of the total embarrassment and always, ALWAYS I would regain every last stinking pound. Because of the depression,remorse, and loneliness, I would gain 50 or more on top of it. Then I looked back on all the MONEY I spent to lose weight....oh good Lord, a boat load of wasted money. I might as well just flushed fists full of cash down the toilet. Why even bother? Then the talking, talking, talking about it. It drove loved one away. They got so tired of my TALKING and never DOING. I don't know how my dear husband ever stayed with me...I lost a lot of friends over the TALKING.

I think the last time, (THIS TIME) I decided to do things differently. I didn't start worrying about a goal weight the minute I started. I didn't start making graphs and charts, I didn't worry about how long it would take, or what size I wanted to be, I didn't spend any money. I didn't start to impress anyone, or to "get a man", or make anyone happy. I started because I knew if I didn't I was going to die an early death. When I started my main goal was to get healhy and to keep off the pound/s I lost for that week. I didn't care if I lost 1-10 pounds a week, but my vow was not to regain it. I was only going to lose as much as I thought I could maintain.

Something will have to click in you, I firmly believe that. I hope you don't have to reach rock bottom like I did, but buying "stuff" and saying "stuff" will not get you fit. There will have to come a point that you are done screwing around with it. People will get tired of hearing it, your family will get annoyed with your talking, talking, talking and never doing, doing, doing. You need to either do it, or stop talking about it....period.

SugarJunkie
01-13-2010, 10:16 AM
Reading through this thread struck something in me. I can't really explain it, but it did hit a cord.

Y

For nearly 3 decades I asked myself (and counselors too) why I ate so much and couldn't stick to a diet. They had a lot of suggestions, but none of them suggested what turned out to be true. When I eat high carb foods, especially refined sugars and carbs, followed by unrefined grains, and to some degree fruits, I am hungrier. The less healthy the food, the hungrier I get. To lose weight, I need to manage hunger - and for me, that means limiting high carb foods, even some of the healthy ones (I may be able to add them back in later, and maybe not - either way I'll be fine as long as I adapt, and keep doing what works).


I'm another person who NEEDS to completely give that stuff up. It just doesn't work for me. *sigh*

This is very much true for me, except that "hungrier" for me really means "cravey-er". I don't think I'm actually physically hungrier, but I can't take my mind off of food and once I start into that "should I or shouldn't I" battle with myself, then I'm lost.



AMEN! It's the "Once you pop, you can't stop" mentality for me. I crave and I crave.

I had to give it all up, all together. (At least for now...)


Something will have to click in you, I firmly believe that. I hope you don't have to reach rock bottom like I did, but buying "stuff" and saying "stuff" will not get you fit. There will have to come a point that you are done screwing around with it. People will get tired of hearing it, your family will get annoyed with your talking, talking, talking and never doing, doing, doing. You need to either do it, or stop talking about it....period.

I think the "click" is needed for a lot of people...I'm not sure why, but you really need something to shake you to the core. (Even if it's something as minor as getting out of breath while walking from the couch to your daughters bedroom to check on her. That's what shook me so hard I couldn't imagine turning back.)

caryesings
01-13-2010, 11:00 AM
Something will have to click in you, I firmly believe that. I hope you don't have to reach rock bottom like I did, but buying "stuff" and saying "stuff" will not get you fit. There will have to come a point that you are done screwing around with it. People will get tired of hearing it, your family will get annoyed with your talking, talking, talking and never doing, doing, doing. You need to either do it, or stop talking about it....period.


I agree with the "click". There was no dramatic event for me, just suddenly one day I was ready to do ALL the things that I knew I needed to do. Starting is honestly the hardest part. Once the results started adding up, it's easier for me to stick to. But I won't lie, the first months were sheer guts to stick to my plan and NOT get on the scale for 72 days as I told myself I needed to stick with the plan REGARDLESS of results.

TJFitnessDiva
01-13-2010, 11:03 AM
Something will have to click in you, I firmly believe that. I hope you don't have to reach rock bottom like I did, but buying "stuff" and saying "stuff" will not get you fit. There will have to come a point that you are done screwing around with it. People will get tired of hearing it, your family will get annoyed with your talking, talking, talking and never doing, doing, doing. You need to either do it, or stop talking about it....period.

Yes yes and YES!

You can want something with all of your heart but if you aren't willing to put yourself out there or take steps to achieve it no amount of wishing/wanting/hoping is going to make it happen. It starts with you.

ubergirl
01-13-2010, 01:04 PM
Yes yes and YES!

You can want something with all of your heart but if you aren't willing to put yourself out there or take steps to achieve it no amount of wishing/wanting/hoping is going to make it happen. It starts with you.

Yes.

Trazey34
01-13-2010, 01:49 PM
maybe it's the counsellor in me, but I maintain there's more at play than just poor food choices that gets us all over 200 or 300 pounds. For myself, I was spoiled, self-indulgent beyond measure, and refused to grow up. So I worked on that in tandem with changing my eating habits. It took a long time to lose, about 2 years I think in total, but I feel i've really CHANGED, not just DIETED.

You can want it, you can be stoked to start, you can desire it above all things, but if there's stuff underneath that's going to chip away no matter what you do, I recommend digging under the surface and seeing what's there. Not everyone has emotional issues to deal with, it's not like the movies where every fat girl was abused as a child, sometimes it's just bad habits heaped upon low self-esteem, but it still needs to be addressed. Maybe you're afraid of failing, so why bother starting? Maybe you're afraid of success, and trying to self-sabotage? Maybe you don't think you're worth the effort? there's a million thoughts swirling around out there! But don't give up, there's light at the end of the tunnel :)

irishsarah
01-13-2010, 02:47 PM
sign my name to RockinRobins post... I just DECIDED that I was not going to be fat any more and I would do WHATEVER it took to make that happen.

OMGoddess! I've been away FAR too long! LOOK AT YOU, CFMAMA! I hardly recognize you! Where did the rest of you go?!?!?! You look WONDERFUL!

irishsarah
01-13-2010, 02:58 PM
I understand you. I should have been at goal by now. Instead, I am having to start over. Well, not completely over. I have been able to keep off about 30 pounds for a year, but I've been the same weight now for a loooooong time and it is far from goal.

I've had a slew of health and family issues that got back into my mindless stress eating. I kept telling myself that when things got better, that I would start again, and focus on me. Well, reality is starting to set in. Things are NOT going to get better anytime soon so I have a decision to make; to let everything else get in my way (even if it is just a mental block) or just fake it until I believe it. I've decided to fake it until I believe it.

This time I am deciding to start small instead of aiming big and just go through the motions until my new actions start to replace the old bad habits. One thing at a time. I will ease into each step until it becomes second nature and one, by one, I will eventually be doing everything that I need to do to lose weight and keep it off forever.

I will start to post here again everyday...no matter how busy. Then when that is no longer something I have to remind myself to do, I'll add another step like keeping a daily journal- something I am notoriously bad at doing. When that is no longer an issue, I'll add something else. Once I have the journal started, I will have a very valuable tool to make some REAL LASTING changes. I may add a few baby steps in there along the way...making a choice to skip the bread, or to not search for the closest parking space...but this time, it will all be baby steps. This is not meant to be a punishment; it is meant to make me a happier, healthier person. That shouldn't be something to dread now should it?

Good luck! :hug:

VickieLou
01-15-2010, 10:42 PM
Thank You for Your Support and Encouragement! I started Day 1 of my meal plan and stayed on it today. I worked out 3 times this week for 30 - 40 minutes. I haven't always had a weight problem. When I was about 18 I went to this diet center and was on an extremely low calorie diet and they gave me diet pills. To this day I have no idea what I was taking. I got down to around 115. Then I went on a major binge and gained alot of weight. I guess I'm afraid I will put all my weight back on after I lose it. That's something I hadn't thought about in along time. But I need to be willing to do what it takes to keep my weight in check once I get to my goal weight. I also need to Plan better.

KTFaith05
01-15-2010, 11:25 PM
Wanting to lose weight and WILLING to do what is necessary are two different things. Your title says that you WANT to lose weight, but that is sadly not enough. You MUST be WILLING to make a change. You must be WILLING to what is necessary, what is required. You've got to be WILLING to say no to this and yes to that. Be willing to plan ahead. To stay within a calorie allotment. To have the right foods on hand and get rid of the *wrong* ones. You've got to be willing to change - once and for all and permanently.

Your desire to be thin, slim, trim, fit and healthy MUST outweigh, overtake and overpower your desire for the high calorie/high quantity foods. It can't occur any other way. You have to want this, really, really badly.

People ask me all the time how I lost so much weight when they can't even lose 10 lbs. I tell them that I DECIDED to. I had always *wanted* to, but then one day I just DECIDED to. Upon deciding to to lose the weight, I therefore had to COMMIT to lose the weight. It's that commitment, that ironclad commitment that gives you that stick-to-it-ness.

Decide what it is you want the MOST in life and then resolve to pay *the price* to get it done. We ALL have the ABILITY to lose weight. It's all a choice that we make. We choose to be heavy and we can then choose to not be and to remain that way. Losing weight and lots of it is doable for anyone and everyone - yourself included, if that's what you TRULY want and you are willing to make and keep the changes that are necessary to make it happen. :hug:

I want to thank you for saying this. I have had a very bad week (not food related) and actually let myself lose control last night and consume way more unhealthy calories than I have been for the last two weeks. As I was reading these posts, I was thinking that I wanted to just forget it and give in and let stress be my excuse. You are so right and I realized...I have decided to do this and at my size it is no longer a want to lose weight, it is a must and I truly do want to get healthy. I now know that I have to COMMIT to change and I am the only person standing between me and my goals!