Food Talk And Fabulous Finds - Egg Whites--Can Someone Explain To Me Why I Should Not Eat Whole Eggs?




HadEnough
01-06-2010, 08:49 AM
So, I have been curious as to why most people (or so it seems) only eat egg whites vs. the whole egg. I love eggs, and I just don't feel that I would be satisifed just eating whites. So I googled it, and this is one article I came across. If this is true, what is the purpose of only eating egg whites?

Egg yolks were terrible for you...that's where all the nasty fat and cholesterol is." We've all heard this statement before. But is it correct? This is a perfect example of how confused most people are about nutrition. In a world full of misinformation, somehow most people now mistakenly think that the egg yolk is the worst part of the egg, when in fact, the YOLK IS THE HEALTHIEST PART OF THE EGG!

By throwing out the yolk and only eating egg whites, you're essentially throwing out the most nutrient dense, antioxidant-rich, vitamin and mineral loaded portion of the egg. The yolks contain so many B-vitamins, trace minerals, vitamin A, folate, choline, lutein, and other powerful nutrients... it's not even worth trying to list them all. In fact, the egg whites are almost devoid of nutrition compared to the yolk.

Even the protein in egg whites isn't as powerful without the yolks to balance out the amino acid profile and make the protein more bio-available. Not to even mention that the egg yolks from free range chickens are loaded with omega-3 fatty acids.

Yolks contain more than 90% of the calcium, iron, phosphorus, zinc, thiamin, B6, folate, and B12, and panthothenic acid of the egg. In addition, the yolks contain ALL of the fat soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K in the egg, as well as ALL of the essential fatty acids. And now the common objection to saying that the yolks are the most nutritious part of the egg..."But I heard that whole eggs will make my cholesterol skyrocket." This is FALSE!

First of all, when you eat a food that contains a high amount of dietary cholesterol, your body down-regulates its own internal production of cholesterol to balance things out.

Secondly, if you don't eat enough cholesterol, your body simply produces more since cholesterol has tons of important functions in the body. And here's where it gets even more interesting...There are indications that eating whole eggs actually raises your good HDL cholesterol to a higher degree than LDL cholesterol, thereby improving your overall cholesterol ratio and blood chemistry.

Thirdly, high cholesterol is NOT a disease! Heart disease is a disease...but high cholesterol is NOT. Cholesterol is actually a VERY important substance in your body and has vitally important functions... it is DEAD WRONG to try to "lower your cholesterol" just because of pharmaceutical companies propaganda. In addition, the yolks contain the antioxidant lutein as well as other antioxidants which can help protect you from inflammation within your body (the REAL culprit in heart disease, not dietary cholesterol!), giving yet another reason why the yolks are actually GOOD for you, and not detrimental.

In a recent University of Connecticut study that one group of men ate 3 eggs per day for 12 weeks while on a reduced carb, higher fat diet increased their HDL good cholesterol by 20%, while their LDL bad cholesterol stayed the same during the study. However, another group ate egg substitutes (egg whites) and saw no change in either and did not see the improvement in good cholesterol that the whole egg eaters did.

So I hope we've established that whole eggs are not some evil food that will wreck your body... instead whole eggs are FAR superior to egg whites.

And can we all please STOP with this sillyness about eating an omelet with 4-5 egg whites and only 1 egg yolk... If you want real taste and real health benefits, we'd all be better off eating ALL of our eggs with the yolks.

So next time a health or fitness professional tells you that egg whites are superior, you can quietly ignore their advice knowing that you understand the REAL deal about egg yolks.

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Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Tom_Beagle


ThicknPretty
01-06-2010, 09:11 AM
I always eat the whole egg :?: But I know that a lot of dieters stick with the whites...I guess the theory it is that it eliminates the fats?

I'm like you though, I love eggs. And the times I've eaten just the whites, it's been rather disappointing (bland). I think some fat is good every now and then and I consider a hard boiled egg in it's entirety a very healthy snack for me!

I hope someone can solve the mystery for us! :dizzy:

silverbirch
01-06-2010, 09:12 AM
Cheryl - I've never understood it either!


cathydoe
01-06-2010, 09:16 AM
Less fat and Less calories <I think>

JerseyGyrl
01-06-2010, 09:18 AM
EXCELLENT article:bravo: I've been eating whole eggs for years....on average 14 a week.
On the subject of cholesterol, this is also a very interesting article....http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-mark-hyman/why-cholesterol-may-not-b_b_290687.html

TempleBody
01-06-2010, 09:19 AM
http://lowfatcooking.about.com/od/faqs/f/eggs.htm

Googling will have you finding many things.

I eat egg-whites to keep calories, fat, and cholesterol low while still getting protein. I don't eat just egg-whites though. I usually mix in one egg and then add 1/4- 1/3 cup of egg whites. I'd be skeptical of ezine articles as they're not credited by anything. Just by reading the article, you can see that is made for hype. I'd consulted credible organizations like medical associations, nutrition groups etc. You can find anything about nutrition ...just compare Weston Price to Dr. Joel Fuhrmann or Dr. Mercola to US Food Guide...or even the Canadian food guide to the American one. It's all different...

Taurie
01-06-2010, 09:20 AM
My reasoning is that there are loads of calories and fat in the yolk. If I have one egg for breakfast I'll have the whole egg, but if I have scrambled eggs or an omelette I'll use 1 egg white and one whole egg. It saves 50+ calories.

Ilene
01-06-2010, 09:23 AM
Good article...

I realise that the yolk is good for you, but if I ate 4 eggs (214 calories, 5g fat, 6.3g pro) every morning like I eat 4 egg whites ( 51 calories, 0.2g fat, 10.8 pro.), the calories would add up way too fast for my liking. Plus I eat the eggwhites every single morning, I doubt that eating 4 eggs every single morning would be healthy... Sometimes I add a whole egg but usually not...

Serendipity
01-06-2010, 09:26 AM
I prefer the whole egg, but I think many people go with whites-only to limit the calories. A large whole egg can be around 90 calories, with the white only being around 30 for the same amount of egg material. With one egg that may not seem like much, but when you calculate it out, it means you can have (for example) the equivalent of a 3-egg omelette in egg whites for the same calorie count as one egg.

RealCdn
01-06-2010, 10:01 AM
I tend to split the difference. Some mornings I'll have 2 fried eggs, other mornings I'll have scrambled (egg whites/one egg). I also make waffles with egg whites, mainly because they work better. Out of egg whites one morning I used a whole egg and the texture was off. I never toss the yolks though. I buy eggs and a 3-pk of egg whites from Costco. :)

ars
01-06-2010, 10:48 AM
I eat both, depending on what fits better into my calorie needs.

For a breakfast omelet, 4 egg whites is a heck of a lot more protein and quantity of food than 1 whole egg for about the same amount of calories. For an afternoon snack, I'll go for a whole hard boiled egg.

L R K
01-06-2010, 10:56 AM
I always eat the whole egg - but I am assuming that people who only eat the whites are worried about cholestrol and calories.

ennay
01-06-2010, 11:00 AM
calories - I have 3 eggwhites and 1 whole egg every day. 1 whole egg isnt big enough to encase my 2-3 cups of veggies. 2 eggs is more calories than I want and less filling.

If I have fried eggs I have whole eggs.


I dont really care about the fat or cholesterol part. (except that the fat is why the calories are high)

It does bug me to toss the yolks every day.

CLCSC145
01-06-2010, 12:09 PM
... but if I ate 4 eggs (214 calories, 5g fat, 6.3g pro) every morning like I eat 4 egg whites ( 51 calories, 0.2g fat, 10.8 pro.)...

Not to be contrary, but 4 whole eggs have more protein than 4 egg whites because with the whole eggs, you have the added protein in the yolk (it's 2.7g of protein in the yolk alone and 3.6 in the white).

But I understand that the lower calories and fat is attractive at times. I eat them both ways.

kaplods
01-06-2010, 03:56 PM
Not to be contrary, but 4 whole eggs have more protein than 4 egg whites because with the whole eggs, you have the added protein in the yolk (it's 2.7g of protein in the yolk alone and 3.6 in the white).

But I understand that the lower calories and fat is attractive at times. I eat them both ways.


You can't really compare 4 whole eggs to 4 egg whites - they're not the same amount of food. With the 4 whole eggs, you get more calories, more fat, and more volume. Of course a whole egg has more nutrition than a fraction of an egg - it's the distribution of that nutrition (it's density and proportion) within the parts that is important.

Egg whites have a higher protein content per volume, than whole eggs do (as well as less fat). So egg whites are a better bargain for the volume.

In an exchange plan, like the one I'm on:

1 egg = 1 protein (75 calories) but

3 to 4 egg whites = 1 protein (50 - 70 calories)


So an omelette made with 6 egg whites is equivalent to a 2 whole-egg omelette (not an omelette made with 6 whole eggs).

My preference is a compromise of 1 whole egg and 3 egg whites.

Ilene
01-06-2010, 07:15 PM
CLCSC145 -- :lol: my math sucks at the best of times and I was posting at work and in a rush... sorry for the mistakes!!

kaplods -- that was a great summary and explained it best...

I'm also not saying that I never eat the yolks, I vary my eggs depending on my calorie intake of the day...

CLCSC145
01-06-2010, 07:42 PM
@Kaplods, you probably wouldn't eat 4 whole eggs in place of 4 egg whites, but in a straight apples to apples comparison (and referencing Ilene's example) not considering volume equivalents, 4 whole eggs have more protein than 4 egg whites - toss the yolks, toss some protein too. That's all I meant. :)

Ilene
01-06-2010, 07:51 PM
@Kaplods, you probably wouldn't eat 4 whole eggs in place of 4 egg whites, but in a straight apples to apples comparison (and referencing Ilene's example) not considering volume equivalents, 4 whole eggs have more protein than 4 egg whites - toss the yolks, toss some protein too. That's all I meant. :)Ilene's very poor example :rolleyes:

CLCSC145
01-06-2010, 07:58 PM
Ilene's very poor example :rolleyes:

No! No! No! :D Not a poor example at all. If you ever wonder why so many of my posts are edited, it's because I am the queen of post boo boos! No worries, I just didn't want someone somehow thinking whole eggs were lower in protein. I eat both kinds depending on how many calories I have to spare at the time...

Ilene
01-06-2010, 08:05 PM
No! No! No! :D Not a poor example at all. If you ever wonder why so many of my posts are edited, it's because I am the queen of post boo boos! No worries, I just didn't want someone somehow thinking whole eggs were lower in protein. I eat both kinds depending on how many calories I have to spare at the time...I totally understand :lol:

kaplods
01-06-2010, 09:49 PM
My only point was that your nutritional needs and goals determine whether it makes sense to separate an egg (and also which half you decide to keep).

If you're only caring about protein, it probably does not make sense to separate the egg. If you care about protein AND fat, or protein AND calories, or calories and volume, or protein and volume or any number of other combination of factors it can make a big difference.


There are many nutritional needs/goals that make it perfectly reasonable to eat a partial egg or to eat yolks and whites in diffferent proportions. The choice in that regard, depends on the factors/nutrient(s) you're looking, as well as those you're wishing to avoid. It could mean keeping more yolks than whites, or more whites than yolks.

If a person needed more fat in their diet (doesn't happen very often in the USA, but just for argument's sake we'll imagine), or needed to limit their protein, but not their fat - or anyone who had a greater need for the nutrition yolk than the white, might have good reason to wash the whites down the drain.

What makes sense, depends upon what you're looking for and why.

To me, using fewer yolks generally makes the most sense, because I choose to limit fat. I COULD spend my fat exchanges on egg yolks, but I would rather spend my fat exchanges elsewhere. Egg whites are a better "bargain" for me, because they have no fat.

ennay
01-06-2010, 10:44 PM
If a person needed more fat in their diet (doesn't happen very often in the USA, but just for argument's sake we'll imagine), or needed to limit their protein, but not their fat - or anyone who had a greater need for the nutrition yolk than the white, might have good reason to wash the whites down the drain..

My friend wishes she lives next door to me. She has extremely low cholesterol. To the point where the doctors say she can not produce enough hormones. She eats egg yolks and tosses the whites.

I eat eggwhites and toss the yolks.

We are like Jack and Mrs. Sprat, but alas we live too far apart to make this work.

mandalinn82
01-07-2010, 12:51 AM
I typically eat only the whites, for pure calorie/protein ratio reasons. I save the yolks, though, and use them in baked goods and custards and lemon curds (usually for other people, but a tbsp of lemon curd is amazing with some berries for dessert). The yolks are also great for finishing Asian or Greek-style soups. But for everyday eating, I do go with the whites to get more protein for the same volume and fewer calories.

PinkyPie
01-07-2010, 02:58 AM
Same concept for me - calories and fat, except I'm a weight watcher. I love eggs and would never *just* eat the whites. I need at least 1 yolk to feel satisfied!!

Mikan
01-07-2010, 11:28 AM
I just bought some "real eggs" egg whites in a box at costco. They have way less calories, so thats why I was interested. In my normal diet I usually eat a LOT of eggs every day, so this was something important for me.

Ilene
01-07-2010, 11:42 AM
I just bought some "real eggs" egg whites in a box at costco. They have way less calories, so thats why I was interested. In my normal diet I usually eat a LOT of eggs every day, so this was something important for me.I use the egg whites in a box too, not that much more expensive... I won't even attempt to do the math :dizzy:

ennay
01-07-2010, 11:51 AM
I used to use those but for some reason about a year ago I started being able to taste the preservative or stabilizer or whatever non egg stuff they put in them. Dunno why.

Ilene
01-07-2010, 01:05 PM
ennay, the one I use is pasterized has no preservatives, no flavour, just pure egg whits... There is another type of egg substitute that has flavours and such, I don't like that one either...

Tomato
01-08-2010, 12:22 PM
I always eat an entire egg. If I make is crambled I always add some egg whites (from a carton) to get more protein. But I would never throw out the yolk - it's too good to waste.

kaplods
01-08-2010, 12:56 PM
I prefer to waste an egg yolk than to buy egg whites in a carton.

For one thing, I have no idea what the packaged egg-white folks are doing with the yolks - for all I know, they're flushing them down the drain. Even if they're finding a use for them, the "waste" of the processing overshadows it. In the long-run there's less waste in separating eggs yourself, even if you are tossing the yolks (or doing something else with them, using them as hair conditioner, making tempera paint, feeding them to your dog....)

The simplest, lowest-tech solution, is generally the least wasteful.

If you calculate the cost per egg white, it's cheaper, less wasteful, and better tasting to do the separating (even if you buy local, free-range eggs and throw away the yolks) than to buy egg-white product.

There's also the issue of freshness. Egg whites in a carton are never going to be as fresh as eggs - even store-bought eggs.

MindiV
01-08-2010, 01:09 PM
I just hate cracking and separating the yolk from the whites, so I buy the whites in cartons. I can't ever do it cleanly, I get shells in it, etc. No shells from a carton...

Firecracker777
01-08-2010, 02:34 PM
I usually on have eggs on the weekend because i dont have time during the week to actually cook a breakfast. I usually just make 1 egg instead off 2.

kaplods
01-08-2010, 03:22 PM
I didn't mean to imply there's anything wrong with using egg substitutes/egg whites from as carton, if you know what you're buying and why.

Just that if you're opposed to the wastefulness of discarding an egg yolk or two, you should know that there's virtually always more waste associated with a processed product, than doing it yourself.

Convenience is a commodity worth paying for, and we all have to determine what our time is worth, and when we're willing to pay others to do stuff for us (and that's great as long as we know what we're sacrificing in return, and are ok with that).

To misquote mandalinn82 terribly: Of the three, you usually get to pick only two: healthy, convenient, and cheap.

On disability, hubby and I now have a lot more time than money, so we generally consider it "paying ourselves" to do more things ourselves.

Now that I'm doing so much more myself though, I'm constantly surprised at how little time the work actually costs us. We're not spending hours and hours in the kitchen. Our daily average is probably an hour or less (often much less, because we make a lot of fast-to-prepare, but slow-to-cook stuff, in the crockpot or in a dutch oven on the stove or in the oven).

For example, buying salad in a bag. The iceberg lettuce (carrot and cabbage, added usually) variety always tastes weird - like the bag, and it spoils in a few days. This week, I finally calculated how much time I "save" by buying the bag. About 15 to 20 minutes, at the most - so I'm essentially paying someone else up to $12 an hour or more for the chore.

However, if I buy the Sam's Club spring lettuce in the bag, there's virtually no difference than buying the lettuce and washing it myself (unless I had a garden and could grow my own). It's more like $2 an hour.

I guess you could say that I've determined that my time is worth less than $12 and more than $2 per hour.

ANOther
01-10-2010, 07:04 PM
I'm not much of an egg eater (although this morning I had one of those Jimmy Dean D-lite bowls with scrambled egg white, turkey sausage, potatoes and a bit of cheese); if I do cook with egg I get Egg Beaters instead (which are now available with yolk). But Eat This, Not That says not to worry about the yolk because they think the nutrients in the yolk outweigh any concerns about cholesterol. ETA 01.12: of course if you really, REALLY have to watch your cholesterol intake YMMV

CJZee
01-12-2010, 09:29 AM
I thought this was an interesting video on eggs. I myself usually eat one egg + 2 whites in my omelet, not because of cholesterol concerns but because of the extra calories in the yolk.

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/eggs-good-bad