Does it Work? - Quick Loss Diet Spray with Hoodia?




mkendrick
12-15-2009, 03:27 PM
Ok....I've NEVER bought a gimmicky thing like this. But, I was waiting in line at Walmart, saw this, it was only a few bucks, and thought "what the heck."

Has anybody tried it? I think I might do 5 sprays around mid-morning for about a week and see if it has any effect. It supposedly boosts energy and suppresses appetite, and that's usually when I need a boost and start getting the munchies. I'm NOT expecting this to work, it's more of an experiment for kicks and giggles than anything else. I know that nothing can replace a healthy diet and exercise :)

Anyways, just wondered if anybody had heard of this OR if anything in the ingredients look possibly harmful.

Here's the product (I spent like $3 on it, lol) --> http://www.amazon.com/Hoodia-Appetite-Control-Burner-Booster/dp/B002LNRVQ0


Iconised Ghost
12-15-2009, 03:50 PM
i think i remember seeing something similar (not sure if it was the exact same product) on a tv programme- they tested it on 2 groups, one who got the real spray and one who didnt, and there was no signficant difference between the two groups in terms of weight loss. But I dont know how well controlled that experiment was, since it was just a tv show :dizzy:

beerab
12-15-2009, 05:26 PM
I stopped wasting my money on that junk a LONG time ago :)


LookingForMeAgain
12-15-2009, 05:54 PM
Just be careful most of these types of items have stimulants and can cause heart attacks in normal healthy people with no known underlying problems. The thing is if you consume them with caffeine found in food and drink or other stimulants in say cold meds you get a very dangerous combo.
Just be careful. When we were asked by our patients for weight loss drugs wed always refer them to the D+E Diet and Excercise! Which you already know is the way to go. So just be careful with your experiment and dont add any extra stumlants to the mix while using it.

luckymommy
12-15-2009, 05:57 PM
I never tried the spray, but I did buy the Hoodia supplements a few years ago right after I saw the story about Hoodia on 60 minutes. It did nothing for me. Later, I found out that companies were having a hard time creating a supplement out of Hoodia and that one would have to use the actual plant to get the benefits.

I can see why you did this for fun though! :)

lackadaisy
12-15-2009, 06:18 PM
Use green tea extract instead :P You can buy it at CVS or Rite-Aid for about $4 and it actually does work as an appetite suppressant / stimulant / metabolism increaser. I mean, green tea obviously has caffeine, so don't overdo it, but a great substitute when real green tea isn't on hand.

mkendrick
12-15-2009, 08:48 PM
Thanks guys :)

Again, I am NOT buying into this stuff. I have never ever bought anything like this, lol. I tried it today, took it right before lunch. I must say that I did get an energy boost and I wasn't hungry for munchies or even dinner for that matter. But I haven't had an appetite for the last two days. But yes, just an experiment, just for fun.

I don't get caffeine from anything else, or any other kinds of stimulants. If I get a wired or jittery feeling, I'll quit.

mom2cole
12-28-2009, 01:57 PM
I tried some supplements with hoodia in them and man they gave me a boost of energy. I took one late in the afternoon and couldn't sleep that night, just wanted to clean, clean clean. Stopped taking them because I didn't like the antsy have to do something feeling on them.

mkendrick
12-28-2009, 02:42 PM
Wow, I kept forgetting to update everyone on this.

I used this quick spray product for a week (actually 10 days, but my official experiment was a week, lol). I didn't change my calorie consumption, eating schedule, work outs at all. Honestly, I didn't notice much of a difference in cravings or hunger control or energy. I lost 2.9lbs, which IS the most I've lost in a week (second most being 2.1lbs). So maybe it did help. I started getting headaches in the evenings, and I'm pretty sure it was the caffeine causing it. So, I quit taking the spray and the headaches went away.

So I'm not sure, it may have given me a boost, but I'm not a big caffeine fan so it wasn't worth it for me.

Wannabee
02-14-2011, 10:05 PM
Hey. I'm new and had a question about this...
Does anyone think maybe it wouldn't jolt you as much, but still work if you maybe used less? I was also having the jittery-caffine problem, but I'm not sure if it would still work to just use maybe 2 or 3 sprays instead of the suggested 5-7. I don't know???

kaplods
02-14-2011, 10:44 PM
The thing is, almost everyone who tries the gimmicky stuff, says "I almost never buy gimmicky stuff," or "I don't expect it to work, but I thought 'what the heck'".

That IS the gimmick, to get you to think, "This probably won't help, but it can't hurt to try."

Most of it is harmless except to your wallet, but some of these products are extremely unsafe (the ones likely to actually be effective, so you'll keep buying them until you experience the harmful side effects).

People assume that these products have to be proven safe or pass some product testing guidelines, but there are no testing guidelines for most herbal products. Unlike manufactured drugs, they're not regulated by the FDA.



Man-made products have to be proven safe to get on the market.

Herbal products have to be proven unsafe before they're taken off the market (like ephedra eventually was).

Nola Celeste
02-15-2011, 02:48 AM
Hey. I'm new and had a question about this...
Does anyone think maybe it wouldn't jolt you as much, but still work if you maybe used less? I was also having the jittery-caffine problem, but I'm not sure if it would still work to just use maybe 2 or 3 sprays instead of the suggested 5-7. I don't know???

I'd like to know what the other ingredients were before I even considered using it. Herbal "supplements" have so many potential problems that I could write a novella of a post outlining them, but this article from Consumer Reports (http://www.consumerreports.org/health/natural-health/dietary-supplements/supplement-side-effects/index.htm) that Mandalinn linked elsewhere is a good place to start looking at stuff that's potentially dangerous.

You probably don't take any other medication without knowing exactly what is in it and how much of the active ingredient it contains; why would you do otherwise for herbs just because they're "natural?" So's poison ivy, but I'm not going to roll around in it. :D

Suzanne 3FC
02-15-2011, 06:43 AM
Hey. I'm new and had a question about this...
Does anyone think maybe it wouldn't jolt you as much, but still work if you maybe used less? I was also having the jittery-caffine problem, but I'm not sure if it would still work to just use maybe 2 or 3 sprays instead of the suggested 5-7. I don't know???

We strongly suggest you avoid anything that claims to contain hoodia.

First, it's extremely unlikely that it actually contains hoodia gordonii or P57, the active ingredient in hoodia gordonii that works on the appetite. Hoodia gordonii is protected by law against export unless in live plant form. There's plenty that leaves the country illegally, but most of it has been proven not to be the real thing, or it's other varieties of hoodia that doesn't contain P57. It's been said that there isn't enough genuine hoodia gordonii on the planet to account for all of the hoodia products being sold. They even sell pills with fake certificates claiming it's real :dizzy:

Second, it's now been proven that even the real hoodia gordonii doesn't work and it isn't safe.

First know that all of the companies that have been selling so-called hoodia products have done zero testing, they have simply based their marketing on claims by bushmen in Africa. No studies, no proof.

Until...

Unilever invested more than $20 million dollars over four years working on a version of hoodia that was both safe and effective that they could market in the US. The own Slimfast as well as a lot of other famous brands. They had big plans for hoodia! All went well until they reached the human testing phase. They found that it had no effect on calorie consumption. But more imporantly, the study participants experienced dangerous side effects. So they pulled the plug.

If you are in the African desert and happen upon a live plant and can eat a large chunk of it, about 4 inches long, then you might experience some appetite suppression to help you through your journey. If you want to lose weight, don't count on hoodia.

joyfulloser
02-15-2011, 09:20 AM
hey have simply based their marketing on claims by bushmen in Africa

If you want to lose weight, don't count on hoodia.


...unless, of course, you live in a BUSH! LOL!:rofl:

honeybunnyblues
02-15-2011, 08:26 PM
White tea is the best thing when losing weight. Super antioxidants, fights age, and can help in weight loss. Sounds good to me.

mkendrick
02-15-2011, 10:45 PM
Wow, I forgot alllllll about this, haha. My hoodia "experiment" was a lame week long deal. I knew the whole thing was a joke, and indeed it was. I lost weight while I was on it, but I'm positive that had more to do with my exercise and calorie counting than hoodia spray, lol. It didn't kill me or give me cancer or any such thing. Just a silly spur of the moment, for kicks and giggles, kinda thing. I was standing in line at the grocery store and thought "why not"