Food Talk And Fabulous Finds - Red Meat Not a Bad Idea?




View Full Version : Red Meat Not a Bad Idea?


Eating What I Crave
11-20-2009, 03:23 PM
Many people think that red meat is one protein you should avoid while dieting...

A recent study done by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reported a study that showed women who included red meat in their diet lost more weight.

I have included red meat in my previous diets (as recommended by my nutritionist), and it seems that I lose the pounds more quickly while eating red eat (in moderation of course...in a weeks time maybe three meals containing red meat and only 2-3 ounces of lean steak per meal). Apparently the protein in steak helps you retain muscle mass, which of course helps you burn fat.

Hope this tips helps someone else!

Tonya- It tastes good and I don't feel guilty


nelie
11-20-2009, 03:37 PM
I don't eat meat but did the study say they lost more weight regardless of calorie intake? I've read that fish and poultry seem to get a 'free pass' and people tend to eat more fish and poultry than they'd eat red meat in the same setting. So people have a tendency, if they are eating red meat, to eat fewer calories due to thinking it is less healthy than chicken which they think is healthier and tend to eat more calories of due to that thinking.

mkroyer
11-20-2009, 04:07 PM
Its the purines in red meat


QuilterInVA
11-20-2009, 04:08 PM
Its also good for iron.

bargoo
11-20-2009, 05:12 PM
But not good if you have high cholestrol.

Eating What I Crave
11-21-2009, 01:32 PM
The study was done with both groups eating an equal amount of calories.

nelie
11-21-2009, 02:29 PM
Do you have a link/name of article ? I looked at their site and couldn't find it. Mostly all I saw were studies of the links between red meat and cancer.

kaplods
11-21-2009, 09:20 PM
What is the issue number (the Journal would not have done the research, only reported the results)?

I've read of a recent study that linked protein consumption to suppressed appetite (but the link was to protein, not red meat specifically.) That study though was reported in the Journal of Nutrition and Diabetes (I'm trying to find that article too, because I've only read the results second-hand).

It does make me wonder whether there's been a miscommunication of the study's original findings and conclusions (which is very common when a popular media source reports journal findings).

Research results are often misreported, because the journalists reporting the results often don't understand the science behind the research (and so often the research is quoted, from a quote from a quote from a quote - until it doesn't resemble the original research at all).

The only study I could find in 2009 for the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, that seemed to fit the animal-protein/weight-loss link was volume 90 (p 1203-1214) which only slightly favored high-protein/saturated fat diets (implying animal protein) over high-carb/low-fat diets.

Eating What I Crave
11-29-2009, 09:17 PM
Kaplods, thank you for pointing out the mistake in my word choice, but I'm aware of the AJCN's position within the Nutritional world. I am also aware that research in general is manipulated by journalists, reporters, editors, etc. to support their case and/or opinion, but I don't think that applies to this bit of information.

I was also a skeptic when my nutritionist suggested I add lean red meat to my diet to help add muscle mass (mostly because I'm naturally not a red meat eater), but I added it for 1 month, watched my carbs (but I did not deny myself), and lost 22 Lbs in a little over a month (while gaining muscle mass of course). No other diet had done that for me, and I kept it off for a year without continuing with red meat as a staple (after the first month I had pretty much taken it out of my diet).

The AJCN reported the study here: ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstract/81/6/ from volume 81. The AJCN Article does not detail the entire study, so it does not specify Red Meat as the protein, but the HP diet mentioned does incorporate hefty amounts of red meat. Self Magazine cited the Journal and one of the scientists involved in the study, Dr Manny Noakes, discussing the benefits of adding red meat to your diet here: self.com/fooddiet/2008/07/foods-for-weight-loss. The Research findings were used to create the CSIRO Total Well Being Diet, which incorporates weekly portions of lean red meat, and was written by two of the scientists who conducted this study.


**Cannot post actual links yet

Happy Dieting all!!!

Tonya- It tastes good and I don't feel guilty

kaplods
11-29-2009, 10:50 PM
Found it!


(the link was incomplete, but I was able to find the article by searching on the volume and Dr. Noakes - he has two articles in that issue, both on low-carb/high protein diets.

http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstract/81/6/1298

Quoted from the Abstract:

Background: Limited evidence suggests that a higher ratio of protein to carbohydrate during weight loss has metabolic advantages.

Objective: The objective was to evaluate the effects of a diet with a high ratio of protein to carbohydrate during weight loss on body composition, cardiovascular disease risk, nutritional status, and markers of bone turnover and renal function in overweight women.

Conclusion: An energy-restricted, high-protein, low-fat diet provides nutritional and metabolic benefits that are equal to and sometimes greater than those observed with a high-carbohydrate diet.




and the second

http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstract/81/4/762

Quoted from the Abstract:


Background: When substituted for carbohydrate in an energy-reduced diet, dietary protein enhances fat loss in women. It is unknown whether the effect is due to increased protein or reduced carbohydrate.

Objective: We compared the effects of 2 isocaloric diets that differed in protein and fat content on weight loss, lipids, appetite regulation, and energy expenditure after test meals.

Conclusion: The magnitude of weight loss and the improvements in insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease risk factors did not differ significantly between the 2 diets, and neither diet had any detrimental effects on bone turnover or renal function.

kaplods
11-29-2009, 11:31 PM
Ok, now I feel informed enough to comment on the original post, especially this statement.

women who included red meat in their diet lost more weight.

This isn't really an accurate interpretation of the study results. In fact nothing of the sort can be argued or even inferred from the study. Here's why.

Firstly, their conclusion was not that the high protein diet was superior to the high carbohydrate diet, but that the results were equal and "sometimes" better.


Secondly, it was a high-protein, low fat diet studied (red meat was not examined as a variable). To say that women who included red meat in their diet lost more weight (than those who did not - or those who ate less red meat) you've got to be able to support that with the study methods - and this study doesn't fit that bill at all (not even by inference).


Red meat tends not to be low in fat, so I would wonder how much red meat, the high-protein group actually consumed. It's impossible to say from the study whether the subjects ate much red meat at all. Just because the diet allows red meat, doesn't mean that the participants in the study ate much (or any, for that matter). Because it's a high-protein AND low-fat diet being studied - it would be just as fair (or unfair) to assume that the diets of the high-proteiners was low in red meat and higher in fish, poultry and legumes. Also, there's no comparison made (from what the abstract reveals) to suggest that the high-carbohydrate dieters ate less red meat than the high-proteiners. Both groups might have eaten similar amounts (it's also possible because it wasn't measured - that the high-carbohydraters ate as much or even more red-meat - neither is proven or disproven by the study).

To get a better understanding of the role of red meat in the weight loss equation - a study would have to look at red meat specifically. For example, comparing two diets equal in all respects (carbs, proteins, fats, and calories), except for differences in the amount of red meat consumption.

Comparing a high-carb calorie-restricted diet to a calorie-restricted protein/low fat diet (which may or may not contain similar amounts of red meats - in no way suggests that the amount of red meat affects the degree of weight loss (and certainly doesn't support the conclusion that women who included red meat in their diet lost more weight than those who did not). We don't know how much red meat was consumed by either group.

We also don't know whether the results of study would have been any different if the high-protein group had consumed NO red meat, but only other sources of lean protein.
_________________________________


On a personal note, I do believe that red meat can be included in a weight loss diet - though I've seen no research (including the one sited) that suggests that for weight loss - red meat is superior to other lean and leaner sources of protein - especially from sources that are higher in Omega-3's.

In fact, I've seen a good deal of research evidence for the opposite conclusion - that there are more advantages to eating protein sources much higher in Omega-3 fats than red meat (at least from traditional grain-fed sources).



Which is not to say that red meat can't be part of a good diet (for health and/or weight loss), it's just not fair to say that red meat is superior to other lean proteins especially when it comes to weight loss. The study in question doesn't
suggest, either explicitly or by inference any such thing. It doesn't even necessarily suggest that low-carb diets are inherently inferior.

Thighs Be Gone
11-29-2009, 11:48 PM
I gave up red meat all together when I began my new life. Why? I never have liked it very much to begin with. I do think protein is important but for me red meat makes me very sluggish and constipated.

Violet73
12-01-2009, 08:35 AM
nothing wrong with red meat if eaten only once or twice a week in small portions....very good source of iron !

Eating What I Crave
12-01-2009, 09:34 PM
Ok, now I feel informed enough to comment on the original post, especially this statement.



This isn't really an accurate interpretation of the study results. In fact nothing of the sort can be argued or even inferred from the study. ________________________________

it's just not fair to say that red meat is superior to other lean proteins especially when it comes to weight loss. The study in question doesn't
suggest, either explicitly or by inference any such thing. It doesn't even necessarily suggest that low-carb diets are inherently inferior.

Kaplods,

I'm glad you performed the extra research, but you are missing the mark.

I did not personally interpret the results of this study, but I reported my personal results from adding red meat to my diet.

Dr. Manny Noakes, a scientist involved in the actual research, reported specifically that lean red meat is a good addition to a diet when considering weight loss. "The protein in steak helps you retain muscle mass during weight loss," says study author Manny Noakes, Ph.D.(self.com/fooddiet/2008/07/foods-for-weight-loss?currentPage=). You might have to research her and Peter Clifton, another scientist involved in the actual research, to see their stance on proteins for weight loss, in particular red meat.

The original quote (and research) did not suggest that red meat was a superior protein for weight loss (as consuming too much red meat can have adverse effects), nor was it meant to prove low-carb diets inferior (?). But, for those that enjoy red meat, it doesn't have to be excluded from their weight loss diet (as most believe), and (because of the amount of protein in lean red meat) incorporating it into a low-carb diet can be beneficial to gaining muscle mass quickly, therefore burning more fat.

Viewing the full scope of the study, I don't think we can discredit the scientists who performed the research. All food provided for the study was detailed in the full study report, and the amount of red meat consumed IS included in the full study report (vs. the abstract) 200-g packs for six meals a week.

Quote from study:
"In conclusion, both the HP and HC, which were intended for weight loss, resulted in significant improvements in markers of cardiovascular disease risk, although the HP diet resulted in a greater reduction in triacylglycerol concentrations and improvements in hemoglobin and vitamin B-12 status. An energy-restricted diet high in protein from lean red meat and low-fat dairy products seems to provide a weight loss advantage in subjects with elevated triacylglycerol concentrations—a marker of the metabolic syndrome."

ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/81/6/1298

-The results did show the group consuming lean red meat with a weight loss advantage.

Happy Dieting!

Tonya- it tastes good, and I don't feel guilty