Weight Loss Support - Mentally, what is the hardest thing about beginning?




alyssamichelle
10-27-2009, 05:01 PM
I have been exercising and counting my calories and really being aware this week so far, and I have begun to really be proud of myself. It feels great to exercise (or the feeling of accomplishment that I get from it). However, the hardest thing for me mentally is that I still see myself so fat and big and I really just can't stand to look at myself. It's difficult to be so proud on the one hand and so frustrated on the other. I know I need to not be so hard on myself because I have finally committed to do this, but it's difficult. How about you? What's your biggest obstacle?


MindiV
10-27-2009, 05:05 PM
For me the hardest part wasn't starting...it was going ON once the new wore off. Once the morning workouts got to be "old hat" and a day came up where we had snacks at work and I couldn't partake.

justaloozer
10-27-2009, 05:20 PM
For me the hardest part wasn't starting...it was going ON once the new wore off.

This is where I am at now.

I also am frustrated with how I look too. I've lost 31lbs but I don't really *see* a difference, but I know that is because I see myself everyday.


nooch
10-27-2009, 05:22 PM
Not acting like a baby when people around me are eating things that don't fit into my daily requirements (I prefer the word requirements to allotments, allotments sounds like prison food and semantics are important).

Kae
10-27-2009, 06:03 PM
Probably the hardest part in the beginning was trying to balance my healthy lifestyle and also being social. My family is very social eaters and drinkers so it was (and still is to an extent) difficult to say no and stick to my plan when hanging around them...

Mango30
10-27-2009, 06:19 PM
Ya, my biggest beginning obsticles were staying motivated when even though the number on the scale was moving, the mirror wasn't reflecting that yet. The trick for me was measuring. I decided that if I couldn't see the loss in the mirror I could at least see it on the tape, thats what kept me going from 220 lbs to 200 lbs because between those weights I was still in a size 20-18 pants and xxl shirts and depressed that all my hard work hadn't made me a super model yet.

catherinef
10-27-2009, 06:20 PM
For me, it was accepting that there is no "end." Even when I get to goal weight, my lifestyle and eating is not going to look all that different to what it is while I'm in the process of getting to goal. This is it. This is how it has to be, if what I want is to be a normal weight.

DCHound
10-27-2009, 06:46 PM
I still look in the mirror and dislike what I see, a good bit of the time. Some pictures are shockingly awesome, others are horrible. I remember weighing 185ish and still not liking how I looked in the mirror...I can't wait to get there again and see how bad it really is. Probably not that bad.

Hardest part at first was just with the being patient, waiting for the clothes to start getting too big. I lost a size the first month, so it caught up pretty quickly. Hang in there...besides, what's the alternative? Staying at the starting weight? Not a good alternative! LOL.

HeaterAS
10-27-2009, 08:32 PM
1. those first few days being soooo hungry!
2. when the newness wears off (hasn't yet this time, but I know its coming) and you have to keep going even though the passion is gone

CLCSC145
10-27-2009, 08:51 PM
However, the hardest thing for me mentally is that I still see myself so fat and big and I really just can't stand to look at myself.

I'm with you on this one. This is a hard feeling for me to shake even more than half way to goal... I do find that the percentages of time I'm spending either feeling great or feeling fat are shifting for the better. I'm about 60/40 now (great/fat).

patchworkpenguin
10-27-2009, 09:10 PM
I think the hardest part for me is the feeling that I'm going to be deprived and nothing is going to be fun anymore. I can't relax and enjoy. I have to be 'on guard' against trigger foods etc.

I agree with Catherine F, there is no end. I lost weight several years ago but had no clue what maintainence was and gained about half of it back.

Facing the fact that the lifestyle I'm used to is unhealthy and will contribute to the yo-yo effect helps to keep me on track. Most of the time...

However, what I have been doing is switching back and forth. I'll be on track for several weeks, then relax, slide back into old habits, then realize what is happening and start again. I hope once I get past this back and forth stage and just stick to my plan I'll be happier and healthier.

time2lose
10-27-2009, 09:21 PM
I am with DCHound that the hardest part was being patient, waiting to see results.

I think the hardest part for me is the feeling that I'm going to be deprived and nothing is going to be fun anymore.

I am channeling Robin here but don't see this as being deprived and that nothing is going to be fun. My life is so much more fun than it was 69 pounds ago. Running and playing with my grandsons is well worth not eating some junk. Going shopping or to a movie with friends and not having to worry about being embarrassed by not being able to keep up is so much more fun than eating some food.

I am not deprived now but I was before I started this journey! I could not go for a walk with my husband. I was afraid to travel because I might not fit in the plane seat. I could go on and on.

Think about everything that you have to look forward to! Isn't there something that you can't do now that you want to do in the future?

luckymommy
10-27-2009, 09:23 PM
For me, the hardest part was going to the gym first thing in the morning. I was humiliated for everyone there to see how much weight I had gained in a short amount of time. It was basically 60 lbs. in about 8 months. Before that, I was a thin person and people at the gym would actually ask me for advice on weight loss because they had seen me lose weight before. I had to literally drag myself over there and just have tunnel vision as i walked to my machine. I ignored the stares I thought were probably happening (although I'm not sure if they did since I didn't look up) and I decided to just forget about what everyone thought. That was the hardest part. Also, it was hard to give up the food. It's like losing a best friend really. I didn't know how I would even survive, but I did survive and I feel like now, I'm just doing this for me.

sprklemajik
10-27-2009, 10:12 PM
I think the hardest part in the beginning was trying to make all the new healthy things I was doing habits. It's hard to change out of the rut and start planning out all your meals, it's hard to cook dinner instead of stopping for takeout. It was hard.... now it's just what I do (like vacuuming or brushing my teeth).

Windchime
10-27-2009, 10:52 PM
The hardest for me was actually believing that I could lose any significant amount of weight. Especially in the beginning, because I had to lose at least 25 lbs before I could see the difference in my clothing.

beatific
10-27-2009, 11:12 PM
For me, the hardest part for beginning was, well . . . beginning. I'm a very internal person, so I'll make exercise plans, and eating plans and have everything planned out, but when it's time to start, well, isn't thinking about it enough? Fortunately, when I start, things more or less go smoothly and I can exercise regularly, but man, that hump in the beginning is a tough one to get over. It seems like a small thing, but this issue has come up in areas other than weight loss in my life.

Serendipity
10-27-2009, 11:47 PM
For me, it's breaking the habit of just grabbing for food whenever the urge strikes me (which is when I'm hungry, when I'm bored, when I'm anxious, when I'm depressed, when I'm happy, when I just need something to do with my hands and/or mouth....you get the idea). It's learning to tell myself, "No, you really don't need to stop at Dunkin Donuts just because you're passing one and a boston creme donut sounds good. You just ate!"

It's also learning how to cook and eat nutritiously instead of just eating anything (good or bad) just out of habit.

ubergirl
10-28-2009, 12:57 AM
For me the hardest part, by far, was overcoming the negative voice inside my head... the one that told me, over and over again, that I had started diets with high hopes hundreds of times before and failed every single time...

That voice told me that it was ridiculous to even try because I would end up failing anyway...

The other hard part is the same as the others mentioned-- being patient.

At first it was great because it seemed like I was seeing astonishing differences day after day... but now, I'm starting to realize that this is a long journey not a quick day trip.

Sunnigummi
10-28-2009, 08:07 AM
My main fear was post-weight loss. I've lost the weight before so I knew I could do it again, but my main problem has always been maintaining. I get too complacent when I lose the weight going "I'm slim now, I can ea whatever and how much ever I want!" and back the lbs come. So, my major fear is getting to my goal and then sticking to maintenance level calories. I have my plan out, but the problem is sticking to it.

I would suggest taking weight loss day by day. In the past, I've tended to look at the big picture and seeing the number (20 lbs) I would always get discouraged after losing 5 and then give up. So you're like me, I'd suggest you stick to a daily plan. :)

MindiV
10-28-2009, 08:58 AM
Not acting like a baby when people around me are eating things that don't fit into my daily requirements (I prefer the word requirements to allotments, allotments sounds like prison food and semantics are important).

I'm the same way, Nooch! My husband swung in Sonic the other day while we were driving. I'd suffered through a pretty poor rendition of a sandwich already when he made the unplanned stop. I was SO MAD at him, even though the junior burger and small fries he got fit into his daily calorie requirements. I was mad because I couldn't have one...I'd already eaten...

Trudiha
10-28-2009, 10:04 AM
I didn't find the first bit hard at all, the first 30 pounds seemed to melt off, I'd get on the scales everyday and I'd have lost something, even if it was only a tenth of a pound; that gave me a real buzz. The next bit was pretty good too, I got to buy smaller clothes again that was fantastic and my cardiovascular health has improved massively; being able to run again is a wonderful boost.

I'm finding the middle bit very difficult indeed, firstly I didn't drop any weight for over two weeks, despite, exercising and counting calories like a woman possessed but the worse bit is that I've gone from being a big but well proportioned hourglass shape to a very disproportionate pear and it seems that I'm still only getting smaller on my upper body.

Having dropped over 100 pounds and 80 pounds on two separate occasions in the past I can't remember this happening before but it is giving me enough of a kick in the butt to keep going, I can't have a body that's made up almost exclusivity of hips and thighs.

Maybe all of the bits are hard but all of us are only focused on the current hard?

BellaDiva
10-28-2009, 10:20 AM
I had two false starts to my exercise program and the thing that made them stick was an exercise buddy. Having someone to go with makes things a lot smoother.

ICUwishing
10-28-2009, 11:27 AM
The hardest part of getting started was to stop the thinking, and take the first actions. "Nothing happens until something moves." The snowball of getting smaller, feeling better, getting stronger doesn't happen until you kick it off the edge of the cliff. Sadly, you can't think the fat off - if it were possible, none of us would be here!

Mikayla
10-28-2009, 12:03 PM
Without a doubt the hardest part for me resisting the foods I used to eat, especially when my friends we literally telling me I was any fun anymore because I didn't want to sit/go out and binge with them. Hanging out with friends and food was my pastime.

I used to have near anxiety attacks over not being able to eat junk with my friends and in the beginning I really did feel like I was never going to have fun ever again(dramatic, I know) It got better, thank god.

PammyFl
10-28-2009, 03:54 PM
The hardest part for me was realizing I had SO much weight to lose and it just felt impossible, and not seeing "instant" progress really bummed me out.

JulieJ08
10-28-2009, 04:09 PM
Sadly, you can't think the fat off - if it were possible, none of us would be here!

LOL, that is exactly what I'm prone to do, act like I can "think" the fat off, or anything else that needs to change, for that matter. :)

patchworkpenguin
10-29-2009, 02:43 PM
I've lost the weight before so I knew I could do it again,Your post just pointed out to me that I've been looking at my weightloss from a defeatist point of view! I've felt like a failure because I've re-gained some of my weight. I haven't looked at my weightloss from the perspective of "this is something I can do BECAUSE I've done it before" KUDOs to you!

patchworkpenguin
10-29-2009, 02:54 PM
Think about everything that you have to look forward to! Isn't there something that you can't do now that you want to do in the future?Your post got me thinking about WHY' I want to lose weight. Obviouslly, to be thinnner, but that isn't enough to get me off the couch to exercise, or to not eat another choc cookie. I don't have your specific motivations, then realized that, OF COURSE, if I don't have motivation or a specific goal, I'm not going to lose weight.

LOL, Picture a lightbulb turning on above my head. {or me banging my head against the screen}

dragonwoman64
10-30-2009, 11:17 AM
I felt like I could relate to many posts here.

wow, if I could think the weight off, I'd probably be a size 2(!!!); I had and have so much weight to lose, it was/is hard to imagine reaching my end goal; I get a lot of pleasure out of eating, and it's my friend, I use it to reward myself and relieve stress.

being consistent has always been my biggest problem. so starting wasn't so much the hardest part, but the daily, then weekly, then monthly sticking to the plan. I go a certain distance, then want to treat myself and relax. It's not easy. I enjoy the exercise and don't feel tremendously deprived with the eating, but sticking to the calories and exercise level where I lose weight, and not slacking off after several weeks, that I have trouble with.

even after as much weight as I've lost, I don't feel like I can always SEE the difference, I FEEL a big difference, bec I can remember how much tougher it was physically when I was that much heavier and so out of shape. I'm much happier having that weight off. I do still tend to be hard on myself and how my body looks at this weight (and I let myself forget and don't give myself credit for how far I've come).