Weight Loss Support - Let's talk about consistency




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srmb60
10-12-2009, 10:03 AM
Yes, this notion is spurred by some posts I've read lately :)

Since the 10th of September, I've been putting a concerted effort into losing weight. I'm tracking food, exercise, weight and measurements.
I eat well more days than I don't. I exercise more days than I don't.
For me ... that's pretty consistent. I have done a lot worse. I could do a lot better.

How do you feel about your level of consistency?
How do you monitor how consistent you've been?
How do you feel about your answers to those questions?
What's your interpretation of consistency?


Procrastinating
10-12-2009, 10:55 AM
Whoohoo! Good job, Susan! (:

I'm slowly beginning to get back on track with healthy, non-binging eating habits after I got sick 2 - 3 weeks ago, found myself inside more often without much to do, and started snacking on junk food and gained these bad eating habits. D: For awhile I was doing what's called yo-yo dieting, trying to eat super few calories one day, then just binging the next day (unintentionally, of course, but it happened anyways).

Right now the only consistency I can attest to are my unhealthy snacking habits, haha. But hopefully I can become more consistent with eating healthfully and not binging!

Do you have any tips for staying consistent with exercise and eating?

Wannabeskinny
10-12-2009, 12:42 PM
My idea of consistency is not throwing in the towel. I have good days, I have bad days. I exercise religiously. Food is my major problem, sometimes I do well and sometimes I don't.

With food, perfection is unattainable. Even if I only have 1200 calories I end up feeling guilty (they weren't the "right kind" of calories, the salad wasn't "organic," or "I could've eaten even less."). That's my eating disorder speaking, there's always something to obsess about with food. Food is guilt and frustration so no matter how healthy I eat I still feel bad and end up over eating. I'm very consistent about that! :dizzy:

I feel bad when I have those bad days where I overeat... but what can I do? At least I'm picking myself up and moving forward each time I mess up.


rockinrobin
10-12-2009, 02:34 PM
steadfast adherence to the same principles, course, form, etc.:

The above is from dictionary.com

And to me that is what consistency is about. Repeating the same behaviors over and over again.

I really, really think that consistency, staying with one's program, is the key to losing weight steadily and well, consistently. Without that consistency there's that constant yo-yo-ing.

Persistence and perseverance, now that's a whole other ball game.

Susan, keep on stringing together those good days. The more you've got of em', the "easier" this weight loss thing will be. Keep up the good work!!!

nooch
10-12-2009, 03:04 PM
I'm pretty comfortable with my level of consistency - from the day I decided I was going to do this in May to today I have not had one day where I forgot what I was doing or decided not to do it. I have had days (on vacation) where I have intentionally raised my calories to maintenance level but did not abandon my basic principle (which is "only eat foods that are worth it") and I have had days where I barely ate anything/only ate really disgusting food (I spent a week at my BIL's babysitting my nephew... not a banner food week - mostly string cheese and deli turkey), but I have at no point given up or forgotten or lost sight of what I am doing. Everything I do is intentional. And as a very, very bad binge eater/food hoarder in the past, that is what I need to do. Everything has to be intentional. I cannot allow things to "just happen", because if I let things "just happen" I am back to eating $20 worth of chinese food and $10 worth of burger king in two hours.

I monitor how consistent I am by recording everything (mentally now, I was getting a bit weird about journalling). I thankfully was a dedicated journaller during my binge eating and I read those posts and I say to myself, Denise, you are never more than one step away. Forget, and you're back there.

I'm perfectly satisfied with my answer to those questions as I know what does and does not work for me and I have not felt the need to never waffle on things. More and more foods have been moved to the "not worth it" column for me as I go on. Initially, I thought it would be the opposite - that I would start out slashing things out left and right and slowly add them back in. But no, I've really figured out what is and isn't worth it to me.

Stella
10-12-2009, 03:54 PM
I cannot be consistent in anything I`m not enjoying. That`s why my previous diets have not worked for longer than 2 weeks, and I feel the same with excercising. I enjoy running, and I do it several times a week (although not when I don`t have time). I know I should do weights etc, too, but I hate it so I just won`t stick with it. Accepting this took a lot of the pressure away.

yoovie
10-12-2009, 03:58 PM
I'm consistently injuring myself!! :D

georgiad
10-12-2009, 04:12 PM
I've been pretty consistent with my weight loss, even though it sometimes frustrates me. I go to Weightwatchers, and when I see people losing 3, 4, sometimes 5 or 6lbs a week, I get frustrated that, as usual, I'm sitting there with my 1lb gone. But those are the same people who'll gain a lb or two the next week, whereas I've lost another 1lb.

I think it's better to do things gently and slowly, with consistency, rather than quickly, extremely and at a level that you won't be able to keep up. This isn't until you've lost the weight, this is forever!

I've tried to eat more sensibly, or go to the gym a bit more, rather than 1000 calories and 2hrs at the gym every day. It's not realistic, and you won't keep it up.

srmb60
10-13-2009, 08:23 AM
I'm reading a lot of you to say that consistency is a smoother progress line ... does that sound like what you meant?

Each day, knowing what needs to be done and doing the best you can under the circumstances. Never jumping in at health-threatening depths and never setting the whole plan aside. Knowing that one bout of overeating or one bout of missed exercise is just a blip, not a failure.

rockinrobin
10-13-2009, 08:32 AM
Each day, knowing what needs to be done and doing the best you can under the circumstances..

Susan, actually for me, it's not always about doing "my best". Especially in the beginning. My best wouldn't have cut it. Nu-uh. I had to do what was required. Under whatever circumstances. Changing the circumstances didn't change the requirement. Doing my best at that point was simply not enough. I had to go ABOVE my best and do what was necessary to get the job done. I had to create a new "best". Not sure if I'm making much sense here. :dizzy:

rockinrobin
10-13-2009, 09:24 AM
This has been bugging me. I just want to elaborate here for a sec.

When I say that doing my best was not enough. Well, because it wasn't. I had to step outside of my comfort zone. Go into unexplored territory. It WAS uncomfortable - at first. If I had told myself that it was "okay" to just do my best. Well, I wouldn't have gotten very far. I would have been giving myself permission to stay with what was familiar and known and never ventured into that new arena. It is a little risky, stepping into those untested waters, but once you're in there and you allow (force) yourself to stay in there - firmly- regardless of comfort, you've got to hold onto the fact that the so called discomfort will eventually BECOME comfortable. And it does.

If you don't step outside that comfort zone, if you don't strive to do BETTER then your best, how does one ever grow????????

Thighs Be Gone
10-13-2009, 09:30 AM
I try to remember that I become what I practice every day. This is true for all sorts of things--healthy weight included. I agree that (for me) it's not a good idea to do things over the top--like exercising 4 hours a day or eating 500 calories daily. I was serious as I began in June '08 but wanted something doable long-term. For me that meant, no gym, no trainers, no meal delivery systems and nothing that would require anything outside of myself. I will admit I had a lot to learn. The first couple of months I was eating Lean Cuisines twice a day and hungry. I realized there HAD to be another way. I started educating myself and tweaking my program.

Thighs Be Gone
10-13-2009, 09:34 AM
Oh, and I agree with what RR is saying about stepping outside your comfort zone. When I first began walking and exercising around my neighborhood I thought people would snicker. I even felt that way when I would be at the store looking through the frozen diet entrees. But, it was time for me to put myself at the top of my priority list. This was WAY outside my comfort zone and in complete contrast to what I had been doing for years.

srmb60
10-13-2009, 09:43 AM
But it's not about perfection (whatever the H that is).

And your best can get better as you learn and grow????

DCHound
10-13-2009, 09:45 AM
Susan, actually for me, it's not always about doing "my best". Especially in the beginning. My best wouldn't have cut it. Nu-uh. I had to do what was required. Under whatever circumstances. Changing the circumstances didn't change the requirement. Doing my best at that point was simply not enough. I had to go ABOVE my best and do what was necessary to get the job done. I had to create a new "best". Not sure if I'm making much sense here.

From one of my favorite Nicolas Cage movies, The Rock (from memory, any errors are mine):

"'I'll try my best.' Your best? Your best?? Losers always whinge about 'their best.' Winners go home and **** the prom queen." -Sean Connery

I think that about sums it up Robin. :)

Thighs Be Gone
10-13-2009, 09:46 AM
No, not about perfection. If I am moving towards health 95% of the time, I am still doing exceptionally well. We are all human and therefore, no part of us will be perfect. If I decide I am going to be, well that sets me up for disaster.

DC Hound & RR = SPOT ON

Windchime
10-13-2009, 09:51 AM
It's interesting. At first, my "best" was just trying as hard as I could to not eat junk like potato chips and candy. That really was the best I felt I could do for awhile. But I agree with others; if I had just stayed at that level then I doubt I would be 50 lbs down. As I got stronger and more confident, I had to branch out. When I started running, I did it on the track because I didn't want anyone to see me and snicker. But I finally realized that I needed to go on the street, and I was just going to have to get over myself.

Consistency is the key. I am consistent with food (more so the last couple of weeks), not so much with exercise as I have let that one slip over the past week. I keep track of my food daily in The Daily Plate, and I log my weight daily in a spread sheet. I have a daily graph and a weekly graph. I started this in January and don't know if I'll ever stop because I feel it keeps me on track.

srmb60
10-13-2009, 09:55 AM
I like this line ... moving towards health 95% of the time

DCHound
10-13-2009, 09:56 AM
Sean Connery aside, really one of the key things for me, which may or may not fall under the heading of consistency, was not to throw a whole day/week/month etc. away if I slipped up. I don't slip up often, but yeah it does happen. When I was on Atkins before, if a carb touched my lips, I'd consider the whole day shot to heck and gobble down all the carbs I could before getting back on track. Until the one time (circa 7/4/2003) I didn't get back on track...and gained it all back and then some in the space of six months.

Even before I found 3FC and read all the collected wisdom on this board, I vowed this time, if I made a slip, I'd jump right back on board with the next thing I put in my mouth. No "free days." It's just too dangerous, for me.

Well, maybe that is a type of consistency.

rockinrobin
10-13-2009, 12:36 PM
But it's not about perfection (whatever the H that is).

And your best can get better as you learn and grow????

No, it's not about perfection. There's no need to strive for it, as it's not attainable.

Yes, exactly on line #2. Your best gets BETTER. You push yourself and push yourself and suddenly what was once impossible becomes possible! Aim low, you get low. Aim high, you get high. Ask any successful athlete, any successful business person, any successful - anything.

From one of my favorite Nicolas Cage movies, The Rock (from memory, any errors are mine):

"'I'll try my best.' Your best? Your best?? Losers always whinge about 'their best.' Winners go home and **** the prom queen." -Sean Connery

I think that about sums it up Robin. :)

Cute. And I was always a sucker for Sean Connery. ;)

diabetic z
10-13-2009, 01:42 PM
How do you feel about your level of consistency?
I am very pleased with my current levels. Currently, my blood glucose range is between 70 and 100. I rarely get a reading at or above 100 anymore. My weight loss is progressing nicely. Even with the increase in calories and protein, I am still shedding weight.
How do you monitor how consistent you've been?
I keep a meticulous journal. I test my blood at least 6 times a day and see my dietitian for weekly weigh-ins. I also record my daily exercise routines for my personal trainer to review.
How do you feel about your answers to those questions?
I feel very positive about my answers.
What's your interpretation of consistency?
Stay the course and walk the line. Will I have setbacks? Yes, I am only human. The key is to make the momentary lapse an anomaly. Can I do better? Yes, today's best was yesterday's goal.

"Do or do not... there is no try." - Yoda

Thighs Be Gone
10-14-2009, 02:54 PM
[QUOTE=rockinrobin;2968692]
Yes, exactly on line #2. Your best gets BETTER. You push yourself and push yourself and suddenly what was once impossible becomes possible! Aim low, you get low. Aim high, you get high. Ask any successful athlete, any successful business person, any successful - anything.

You are one smart Chick! :carrot: