Food Talk And Fabulous Finds - The Best Sugar Substitute?




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jefferzzzz
09-01-2009, 06:09 PM
Hello ladies (and men too!),

Do any of you have suggestions for what is the best sugar substitute? I have used Splenda for years, but i'm sure there is something better out there. After reading about Splenda online, it seems alot less appealing. Have any of you tried "Truvia"?

Any other ideas?


Cebsme
09-01-2009, 06:24 PM
Its all about personal preference to me.

My husband can't use aspartame because it gives him horrible headaches.

We don't like truvia or any stevia product because we find it gives our food a horrid after taste.

So we use splenda.

You can usually get free samples, or at least buy a very small amount so that you can try out the Truvia you may like it.

Ryanne
09-01-2009, 06:28 PM
Stevia is one of the ingredients in Truvia, but I prefer Stevia in the Raw. Stevia also comes in a liquid format. It is a plant that is way sweeter than sugar, no calories. I love it because it is natural. I use it with my decaf green tea, and I make lemonade with it and use it anywhere I would use sugar. I think you would like it. It is sold at Health Food stores and maybe local grocery stores if they are health conscious. I tried Truvia once, but didn't really like it, it was a little bitter for me.


happeningf
09-01-2009, 06:29 PM
I think Splenda is the best, over anything! I get headaches too from aspartame. Sweet and Low is the absolute worst.

jefferzzzz
09-01-2009, 06:57 PM
Thank you ladies for the advice!

I think I am just gonna have to find a place around here that sells Stevia and try that. I might just end up sticking with the Splenda if I can't find it.

Thanks again Ladies!

Ryanne
09-01-2009, 07:16 PM
If you can't find stevia in your area, you could purchase it online. I used to use Splenda, but my doc warned me against artificial sweeteners.

Wolf Goddess
09-01-2009, 07:53 PM
Stevia's great for beverages, but I use Splenda for everything else due to the fact it's easy conversion from sugar.

maintain
09-02-2009, 01:40 AM
I swear by Splenda!

pintobean
09-02-2009, 11:17 AM
Its all about personal preference to me...We don't like truvia or any stevia product because we find it gives our food a horrid after taste...

I completely agree with Cebsme. It's personal preference. I've used all - equal, splenda & stevia - over the course of my life.

Years of using artificial sweeteners in coffee I think my taste buds are screwed up to some extent. Not to mention, having a real bad sweet tooth does not help. We (hubby and I) decided to cut out all artificial sweeteners from our life. We used to use splenda in coffee. Let me tell you, it wasn't easy for me. I've switched back to raw sugar for the past several months & it's been a heck of a difficult time switching to it for coffee. 1 tsp of sugar does not cut it for me at all. I've been looking for sugar substitute (that I like) that is natural and well, low calorie.

Then, a friend recommended stevia and I tried it. Totally did not like it. We had the same reaction as Cebsme. Really bad aftertaste (almost bitter). So, went back on sugar and I forced myself to stick to 2 tsp (16-20 oz cup). My morning coffee does not taste the same as it did with splenda.

Then, a friend suggested Sun Crystals (http://https://www.suncrystals.com/#intro) - stevia and pure sugar mix - with only 5 calorie per packet. I recently found it in my grocery store. I'm not quite sure if I like it or not. I usually give new things I try couple days to finally make my decision, yay or nay. I can still taste some aftertaste but it's not as bad as stevia alone. You might want to try Sun Crystals too if it's available.

happeningf
09-02-2009, 01:18 PM
Ugh, the aftertaste of Sweet and Low is just vile! So gross

jefferzzzz
09-02-2009, 05:14 PM
I guess i'm just weird lol... I've never noticed an aftertaste with Sweet N Low, but I definitely like Splenda more. I really can't tell a difference between real sugar and Splenda.

I think I am gonna try the Sun Crystals too, am also gonna buy a small amount of Truvia just to try, assuming they don't have Stevia... I am heading to the grocery in just a few moments, glad I checked this thread first. ;-)

Thanks again for all the advice ladies!

Jeff

Shannon in ATL
09-02-2009, 05:23 PM
I read somewhere on here that Truvia has MSG in it? I get the Sweet Leaf Stevia, never have trouble with it. Splenda makes me sick to my stomach and gives me headaches...

blueberry3
09-04-2009, 10:43 AM
i'm still fine with splenda. I think i'd rather not know what's *really* in it... ignorance is bliss!

Rizeninme
09-04-2009, 12:58 PM
I just got a box of Stevia "in the raw" and I really was happy with it- I had it in a cup of herbal tea, and I really didn't notice an aftertaste like with the artificial sweeteners- I've tried regular Stevia about two years ago and wasn't thrilled with it because I did notice the aftertaste, but this new "in the raw" one is great!

gardenerjoy
09-04-2009, 03:13 PM
I like agave nectar in my tea and some recipes.

Unfiltered honey actually has good nutrients in it and I'm able to get it from a local producer so if there's anything to the idea that pollen allergies can be reduced from local honey, I'm getting that benefit, too. My current favorite breakfast is yogurt cheese sweetened with honey and cinnamon and topped with granola, which has four things that make it to many top healthiest foods lists: yogurt, honey, cinnamon, and oats.

jefferzzzz
09-04-2009, 05:07 PM
I did buy the Truvia, which is definitely not for me. Luckily I had a $2 coupon so it was almost free. I'd use regular sugar first lol.

I couldn't find the Stevia, but Stevia in the raw sounds like a great option. I might just have to buy it online.

Honey, I have thought about that actually. I do not really use much sugar anyway, i only drink water and basically i only need a sweetner for my special k a few mornings per week. I just thought it would add too many calories, but it wouldn't be too bad with only like a teaspoon. I am going to try that also. Thanks for the tip!

Ryanne
09-09-2009, 10:04 PM
I did buy the Truvia, which is definitely not for me. Luckily I had a $2 coupon so it was almost free. I'd use regular sugar first lol.

I couldn't find the Stevia, but Stevia in the raw sounds like a great option. I might just have to buy it online.

Honey, I have thought about that actually. I do not really use much sugar anyway, i only drink water and basically i only need a sweetner for my special k a few mornings per week. I just thought it would add too many calories, but it wouldn't be too bad with only like a teaspoon. I am going to try that also. Thanks for the tip!

I actually found Stevia at Walmart the other day and thought of you. I found it by the vitamins and supplements. It was on the bottom shelf. They had the "packets" not the liquid, but I would sooner use packets. So, hopefully, you will enjoy this. It is not sugar, it is a plant that is a natural sweetener, but no cals. Honey is good, but just don't use too much, and please be careful/wary of "raw honey".:)

me1st
09-10-2009, 12:38 AM
Hello,

I got hooked on Splenda too and I agree that now if I have coffee with sugar I need more that I ever used before. I am actually trying to get off of the Splenda after reading about it online. It looks like there's not much literature on Stevia so I am at a crossroads! Couldn't imagine drinking straight coffee, will have to see how it goes!
Heather

jefferzzzz
09-10-2009, 01:45 AM
I actually found Stevia at Walmart the other day and thought of you. I found it by the vitamins and supplements. It was on the bottom shelf. They had the "packets" not the liquid, but I would sooner use packets. So, hopefully, you will enjoy this. It is not sugar, it is a plant that is a natural sweetener, but no cals. Honey is good, but just don't use too much, and please be careful/wary of "raw honey".:)

No wonder I couldn't find it. Walmart makes me so mad the way they stick stuff in odd places. Then when ya finally learn where things are they get new plan-o-grams and move everything. It's neverending LOL. :dizzy:

Thank you for the heads up, I will definitely get some now. That was so sweet of ya! ;)

Ryanne
09-10-2009, 06:20 PM
Just hope you enjoy it as much as I do. ;)

ANewCreation
09-10-2009, 07:40 PM
I don't use alot of sugar but with the holidays rolling around I thought I'd like to play around with some stuff before I actually do any holiday baking (and when I say baking I mean one pie for Thanksgiving day--my days of excess are OVER).

Anyway, I remember using xylitol, years ago when I found it at a health food store. It was in with the supplements, like stevia. I was at my local Safeway and I found a product called IDEAL, main ingredient xylitol. It also has maltodextrin and <.3% sucralose (isn't that Splenda? I am not sure).

The bag says it bakes like sugar, it's good for diabetics, FDA approved, measures cup for cup like sugar, keeps its sweetness during baking (is that an issue with other products?) and is 0 calories per tsp.

Anyone with any experience with this product? I've used straight xylitol before and my only complaint was that if you overeat this product you will have severe diarhea! Since I've changed my overeating ways that shouldn't be a problem for me but I did want to mention it.

CyndiM
09-10-2009, 08:00 PM
I really like erythrytol or agave, depending on the recipe and how many calories I can spare.

BlueToBlue
09-10-2009, 08:14 PM
According to my acupuncturist/herbalist, Xylitol is the best, or most natural and least likely to cause health issues. She doesn't like Spenda at all. I recently bought a bag of the Ideal brand and it did taste pretty good, probably closest to sugar of any other sweetener I've tried.

Xylitol is also supposed to be the best for baking, i.e., has the closest mouth-feel to sugar. I recently made some nut meal cookies with it and they did come out pretty good. But I've never tried this recipe with any other sweetener, not even with sugar, so I can't really say how it compares.

According to the Nutrition Action newsletter, the only one that is "safe" is Sucralose (Splenda). They don't like Stevia at all and are just so-so on Xylitol. They have a handy guide to food additives (http://www.cspinet.org/nah/05_08/chem_cuisine.pdf).

walking2lose
09-10-2009, 08:38 PM
I was thinking I was doing a good thing by using stevia. That's the first time I ever read that it could cause infertility. Hmm...

Ryanne
09-11-2009, 08:31 PM
I was thinking I was doing a good thing by using stevia. That's the first time I ever read that it could cause infertility. Hmm...

I second this... My doctor warned me against using artificial sweeteners, including Splenda. I use Stevia, because it is so safe. Some people might not like the taste, I don't have this problem. But: Stevia
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Stevia

Stevia rebaudiana flowers.
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Asterales
Family: Asteraceae
Tribe: Eupatorieae
Genus: Stevia
Cav.
Species

About 240 species, including:
Stevia eupatoria
Stevia ovata
Stevia plummerae
Stevia rebaudiana
Stevia salicifolia
Stevia serrata

Stevia is a genus of about 240 species of herbs and shrubs in the sunflower family (Asteraceae), native to subtropical and tropical South America and Central America. The species Stevia rebaudiana, commonly known as sweetleaf, sweet leaf, sugarleaf, or simply stevia, is widely grown for its sweet leaves. As a sweetener and sugar substitute, stevia's taste has a slower onset and longer duration than that of sugar, although some of its extracts may have a bitter or licorice-like aftertaste at high concentrations.

With its extracts having up to 300 times the sweetness of sugar, stevia has garnered attention with the rise in demand for low-carbohydrate, low-sugar food alternatives. Medical research has also shown possible benefits of stevia in treating obesity and high blood pressure. Because stevia has a negligible effect on blood glucose, it is attractive as a natural sweetener to people on carbohydrate-controlled diets. However, health and political controversies have limited stevia's availability in many countries; for example, the United States banned it in the early 1990s unless labeled as a supplement. Stevia is widely used as a sweetener in Japan, and it is now available in Canada as a dietary supplement.

And this from another source:
Stevia and the FDA

America has drummed its fingers in vain awaiting a natural and safe alternative to sugar and chemical sweeteners. People around the world have enjoyed for centuries the healthful, sweet herb that is stevia. Yet for over twenty years, the United States FDA (Food and Drug Administration) has derided stevia as an "unsafe food additive". Their vehement opposal to its importation almost suggests that stevia is some sort of narcotic. The FDA has in the past even implemented seizure campaigns to stop the import of stevia into the U.S. Under legislation passed in 1994, stevia manufacturers were eventually given the right to market stevia as a dietary supplement.
What Supporters Say About Stevia and Stevia Alternatives

Marcelle Pick, OB/GYN NP notes, "… we recommend the herb stevia (Stevia rebaudiana) over sorbitol as a natural sweetener to our patients. Known in South America as the “sweet herb,” stevia has been used for over 400 years without ill effect. Stevia has been enormously popular in Japan, where it has been in use for more than 20 years, now rivaling Equal and Sweet’N Low … [For those] who want to move through their cravings for sugar without artificial chemicals, stevia is a great option."

She goes on to say that although we’ve known about stevia in the United States since 1918, industry pressure from the sugar trade has blocked its use. FDA and similar hurdles aside, stevia is slowly gaining acceptance as a healthy sugar substitute. Though the FDA has approved stevia use as a food supplement, it has not deemed it appropriate as a food additive.

Sound like a confusing game of semantics?

Betty Martini thinks so too. In her article, Stevia - A Natural Choice, she writes: "The public doesn’t care what you call Stevia as long as there is finally something with a record of thousands of years of safety that they can rely on, and something that will allow diabetics to sweeten their food and add taste enjoyment to life."

And finally : It should be noted that, to date, no long term, conclusive studies have been done on the effects or dangers of stevia. Though its routine use has been well noted around the world for centuries, little scientific evidence exists to prove or disprove the side effects of stevia in humans.



Which we are seeing stevia in stores in things like Stevia in the raw and Truvia and others, so it looks like the approval has already happened.

Ryanne
09-11-2009, 08:48 PM
Now we know "why"...LOL:dizzy:

sherrybwc
09-21-2009, 12:36 AM
Well, let's see...

I have Erythritol, Xylitol, Maltitol, Splenda (from pure sucralose to the Splenda packs they don't make anymore to the Splenda/Sugar mix), Truvia, Sweet-n-Low, Stevia, crystalline fructose, AceK (Sweet One), and if I rummaged a bit, probably a couple of others.

I've been sweetening my iced tea for YEARS now with Sweet-N-Low, so I don't even notice the taste anymore. I use a blend of Erythritol/Xylitol/Sweet One for baking. Can't stand the taste of Stevia by itself, but Truvia is OK in coffee to me. So those are my "go to" sweeteners.

Anyway, sweeteners perform best in a blend...where one might provide most of the sweetness, another provides the crystalline structure needed for the texture of baked goods, and yet another improves mouthfeel.

Just my .02.

Sherry

Thighs Be Gone
09-21-2009, 01:02 AM
According to my acupuncturist/herbalist, Xylitol is the best, or most natural and least likely to cause health issues. She doesn't like Spenda at all. I recently bought a bag of the Ideal brand and it did taste pretty good, probably closest to sugar of any other sweetener I've tried.

Xylitol is also supposed to be the best for baking, i.e., has the closest mouth-feel to sugar. I recently made some nut meal cookies with it and they did come out pretty good. But I've never tried this recipe with any other sweetener, not even with sugar, so I can't really say how it compares.

According to the Nutrition Action newsletter, the only one that is "safe" is Sucralose (Splenda). They don't like Stevia at all and are just so-so on Xylitol. They have a handy guide to food additives (http://www.cspinet.org/nah/05_08/chem_cuisine.pdf).


I like the thought of using Xylitol and I think I will make a point to get some this week. One of my children used xylitol spray when she was young to help rid her of recurrent bouts of pneumonia. I remember it actually had numerous health benefits. If I remember correctly, it has actually been in use in the U.S. for many, many decades as a food additive. In addtion, it is made from trees. (I think this is correct.)

Hamoco350
09-23-2009, 11:38 PM
At work we sell NuStevia, which comes in a powder and a liquid. I've heard some wonderful things about it .. the liquid supposedly mixes much better than any powdered sugar substitue out there. That's just what the customers say, though.

Linkage: http://www.nunaturals.com/productcategory/20

Hamoco350
09-23-2009, 11:41 PM
Oh, and yeah .. I'm a Splenda fan. :) NuStevia can be ten bucks for a pretty small amount at GNC. :o

CJ160
09-24-2009, 12:29 AM
I see post talking about Stevia in liquid, powder, and raw form. I understand what powder and liquid look like but what do you mean by Stevia in "raw" form?