100 lb. Club - Would you ever consider doing a month or 2 of a liquid diet?




Jen
08-27-2009, 10:56 PM
I've often thought that if I did a month or 2 of a liquid diet that it would kick start some weight loss. My issues are more around mindless eating than emotional eating. I've often felt that if I could take a pill that would supply all my nutritional needs that I could easily forgo eating. I've done the Master Cleanse and found it very easy to get into the mind set that all I am going to drink is the lemonade drink. The problem with that particular deal is that it is not really intended for weight loss, it doesn't supply you with any protein, fiber, minerals etc etc whereas a good meal replacement or liquid diet drink will. I've been thinking that doing this for a couple of months might break those mindless eating habits, re-establish my ability to feel hunger and get my stomach back down to a normal size. Then I could make a plan to re-introduce food gradually and learn to make better choices. Also I think losing a significant amount of weight would really motivate me to continue. I don't want to do an Oprah or anything like that, I think 2 months is about as much as I would want to do because being aware of what I am eating is really the goal here, not losing half my body weight in a few months. Any thoughts? BTW please don't flame me for this idea, I'd like some constructive feedback. I did get this idea from a hospital nutritionist who was telling me about a particular patient who lives off this one meal replacement, it has all he needs to live and it got me thinking that if this guy has been going on this stuff for months that it would be okay for me for a couple of months (he's not in the hospital related to anything nutritionally or that nutritionist would have said that she'd been trying to get him to eat and she didn't).


cfmama
08-27-2009, 11:01 PM
I've never really thought of doing that. I LIKE eating and it's not something that I want to give up ;) I honestly don't think that you can get the same nutritional balance from a drink as you can from whole healthy foods and I think that eventually your body would suffer.

But on the other hand it's probably better than a steady diet of dorito's and coke so... I dunno!

Elladorine
08-27-2009, 11:14 PM
I've never given something like this a lot of thought, and I'm not sure exactly what you'd plan for your liquid diet to encompass. Would it include certain diet drinks, various juices or broths? Or just the meal replacements and nothing else? And what kind of meal replacement drinks are you thinking about?

What I can tell you is that I drink smoothies every single day, which I guess you could consider "liquid." At this point I blend whole fruits and sometimes veggies with plain yogurt, flax, nuts, and sometimes cranberry juice. I've thought about adding some kind of protein powder so they can be an actual meal replacement rather than a "supplement" when I'm on the go, but haven't looked into it yet.

If you're thinking about a liquid diet, maybe something like these smoothies would help you as a transition, either on the way in it or out? Or maybe they could be a part of the diet itself? In my case, I just love how I can have my healthy, nutritious fruit every day without actually having to "eat" any (the flavor of real fruit tends to be too intense for me), plus they taste great and are extremely satisfying.

Anyway, hope this helps. Good luck with whatever you go with! :)


Manderz88
08-27-2009, 11:19 PM
I think overall you would suffer for this kind of diet because when you do decide to introduce food back into your system your body would retain all the fat contents from the food from being starved of regular food

cfmama
08-27-2009, 11:24 PM
I think overall you would suffer for this kind of diet because when you do decide to introduce food back into your system your body would retain all the fat contents from the food from being starved of regular food

Hmmm... not necessarily. Calories in and calories out are really the only staples of weight loss. So if you were taking 1500 a day in liquids and then started taking 1500 in solids a day... you would experience a brief gain due to your bowels filling with solid waste but then it would be pretty much the same. This is in my own experience.

traci in training
08-27-2009, 11:44 PM
I think I can see what you're aiming for. Totally removing food from the equation and starting over. Interesting concept - not sure I'd last. I need to CHEW! But interesting. You could definitely meet your nutritional needs - we tube feed folks all the time and that's their only source of food. B12 shots are often necessary, but you can live a long time on nutritional supplements. To use it for weight loss in the way you're talking about is something I'll have to think about.

rockinrobin
08-27-2009, 11:44 PM
I personally think that sticking to a certain calorie allotment is all one needs to "kick start" their weight loss.

I'm also wondering, are you speaking about a doctor supervised liquid diet or one that you do on your own?

Perhaps those 2 months could be put to better use by getting some sustainable lifetime good and healthy habits and behaviors into place. Perhaps those 2 months could be put to better use finding/seeking/developing and solidifying a plan that you will be able to follow for the rest of your life. Perhaps those 2 months could be put to better use finding new and healthy recipes and foods that you enjoy. Perhaps you could use that time to develop coping skills, strategies and techniques to help you deal with eating health-ily in a society that's not quite set up for it and the inevitable tough times.

In the end of course, only you can decide what method is best for you. You've got to decide what will work for you and then of course be willing to MAKE it work. Good thing is, when you find something isn't quite doing it for you, you get to look again. :)

rockinrobin
08-27-2009, 11:55 PM
Traci, we posted at the same time. But I'm with you. I need to chew my calories. And yes, I too would never, ever last on something like that. But then again, we ARE all different, though apparently some of us are the same ;).

I can see where making certain, well I guess in this case it would be ALL, foods off limits. You can't overeat them if you're not eating them at all. But that's what I basically did WITHOUT doing a liquid diet. I made certain foods definite NO'S. Totally banned them from my plan. That was MY way of gaining control. But during that time, I developed a LOVE of OTHER foods.

I personally was anxious to start finding a new and permanent way of life. I had accepted the fact that I could no longer go on like I was - with those poor eating habits. I was excited for the change. Didn't dread it, but embraced it. Made it an adventure.

It really is a very personal thing and therefore it's one we all have to personalize.

Glory87
08-28-2009, 01:11 AM
Personally - absolutely not.

If you decide to proceed, talk to your doctor and get under a supervised plan. Being thin is not worth your health.

Symmetry
08-28-2009, 01:22 AM
A few years back I kind of tried that (and I was bordering on ED), and now I can say certainly : no. It's too depriving, you have to 'feed' your brain too into thinking you have enough/ are satisfied. Otherwise it'll (and it will) find a way to compensate.

kiahna23
08-28-2009, 01:40 AM
I have done an all smoothie and juice diet...drank my food...it worked! I didnt gain the weight back but I only wanted to lose 15lbs and I did...But I dont eat junk and fastfood so I didnt gain the weight back...I slowly went back to solids and worked out hard...I dont recommend it though...I just did it for ME...SO for those of you who have a problem with it Im just answering her question..YES I have considered it...

sunflowergirl68
08-28-2009, 03:53 AM
I guess I just don't understand how drinking your food will make you lose weight vs eating it. You don't eat junk food (and limit starches) and limit your portions (and exercise), and you'll lose weight.

The only thing I have a problem with is risking one's health to lose weight. No one should ever consider doing that.

Bonnie+J
08-28-2009, 04:07 AM
i'm not sure if slim fast counts, but i did that for a while and found it very effective. i felt really full after it and you only replace 2 meals with it, you have to have 600calories for your dinner. they also recommend 3 snacks worth 100 calories each during the day. while i was on it, i never felt the need to eat them because i was full from the last "meal", but did because it was part of the plan. i lost 12lbs in 3 weeks, i got bored of it and realised its not sustainable, but if you just want to give yourself a kick then maybe its worth doing it that way?

sunflowergirl68
08-28-2009, 04:27 AM
If you only drink SlimFasts for a month, you'll become malnourished. SlimFast is meant to be a meal replacement, not food replacement. You're totally right, you should combine it with food. I guess SlimFasts are Ok, because they do have protein and fiber in them, but it shouldn't be permanent.

Bonnie+J
08-28-2009, 04:36 AM
If you only drink SlimFasts for a month, you'll become malnourished. SlimFast is meant to be a meal replacement, not food replacement. You're totally right, you should combine it with food. I guess SlimFasts are Ok, because they do have protein and fiber in them, but it shouldn't be permanent.

slim fast dont intend for you to only eat their products all day. i didnt decide to add in meals and snacks of real food, thats the plan they have on the back of the tin. it wasnt my bright idea to combine it with food! lol!

JayEll
08-28-2009, 07:11 AM
No--I haven't considered it. "A month or two" is a long time! I'd be ready for real food after a week.

One thing you might consider is, what do you do when the liquid diet is over? Say you lost 12 pounds... what would be your plan for keeping those pounds off?

Learning to count calories, which is how I lost weight, prepared me for maintenance, so it was an easy transition even though it needed some care. So, I'd say first of all, it should be a doctor supervised plan, and second of all, think maintenance.

Jay

thisisnotatest
08-28-2009, 07:32 AM
Well, I wouldn't go with any commercial plan like a slim fast. ,nor would I go to a hospital for nutrition advice. Most of the staff look like a biggest loser casting call.

See a professional who specializes in nutrition and can speak in several different contexts (not just-buy xyz powder)

There are many people who have done this successfully on what's called a juice feast -i would say a juice feast is healthy, but its easy to go heavy on sugar. One should also add fats like olive oil and avocado. And be aware of iron and B intake.

This is certainly doable, but not to be taken lightly.
Google juice feast for more info.

Also, the transition off is what needs to be focused on most, slowly incorporating solids, added enzymes to assist the body, etc.

But this type of restrictive diet can be socially isolating, set a person up in a circle of guilt, extreme measures, fail, guilt, extreme measures, etc. If they find they can't stick to it.

Also, the fall is approaching and this type of 'diet' can be harder to stick to in colder weather and to be coming off it in time for the holidays, maynot be wise.

Maybe you can start with juice meals, adding raw foods meals.
Good luck with whatever you try

GirlyGirlSebas
08-28-2009, 07:42 AM
Yes, I've often considered doing a liquid diet for a while. I sometimes think it would be nice just to get a large chunk of the weight off and then start working on the mental process of why I overeat. I sometimes think that the weight loss would make me feel more confident and driven to make a change to lose the rest. However, my Mom went on one of the medically supervised plans. She lost a ton of weight and felt fantastic. But, yeah...she gained everything back. I've seen this happen to so many people. Also, these plans are quite expensive. In the long run, I don't think they are worth it. It's a nice idea, but I don't think it really holds water for most of us.

Smiling_Sara
08-28-2009, 08:05 AM
I couldn't do that, myself. I enjoy eating to much. I have just learned to make better choices.

traci in training
08-28-2009, 08:34 AM
Here's another thought - if you're willing to go "no food" then maybe you could try taking that in pieces. Like no junk or no white stuff or no sugar. Totally eliminating some of those things could, I think, be a good way to start. And of course, that's really what we're in for over the long haul, right? Either eliminating those empty calories or scaling back permanently to a degree most of us don't want to think about. I've never met someone my size who only eats fruits, veggies, whole grains and drinks water. It's that other stuff that got us where we are and that's the stuff we have to get under control.

SnowboundChick
08-28-2009, 08:55 AM
I have done slim-fast twice in my life but I think I couldn't even get that to work. I have a real problem with food, I need it! I've not considered a liquid diet only because I'm scared of doing harm to by body by messing up my thyroid and other body parts and scared of not eating. I talked to a nutritionist this past winter about fasting and cleanses and she does not recommend them, are bodies are made for cleansing our bodies, so I guess I don't get them. I have a friend who is always doing one or the other and it doesn't help her at all and she sticks with it but as soon as she's done it all comes back.

paris81
08-28-2009, 09:14 AM
I would never do this. I think it would totally make me crazy, and I'd snap and wind up overeating. Or I'd convince myself that milkshakes were okay--hey, they're liquid!

I don't think that you should do a month or two--unless you talk to a doctor. And I imagine if you talk to a doctor, they'll thell you it's a bad idea. That is way too long to go on just liquids. I have friends who've done it for a week (as a cleansing thing), but they say you're not supposed to do it more than that.

Also, maybe I'm off base here, but my logic says that it would be terribly uncomfortable the in intenstinal region--only liquids go in...only liquids come out. The sounds like it would promise lots of running ot the bathroom.

LisaF
08-28-2009, 09:14 AM
Personally, I wouldn't do it. Aside from health/nutrition reasons, it would set off all of my deprivation triggers, which for me is a surefire way to overeat. It also seems like a really drastic plan, and in my experience, drastic plans of any kind do not lead to lasting weight loss.

Have you considered other strategies to try to deal with the mindless eating? I know a lot of people advocate writing down everything - every meal, every snack, every bite, every drink that isn't water. I would think that doing something like that would force you to be aware of what you're putting in your mouth.

How about something like putting signs on your fridge/snack cabinets that say things like, "Are you hungry?" If they make you pause for just a moment, it can be all you need to stop the mindless eating.

Lori Bell
08-28-2009, 09:15 AM
Here's another thought - if you're willing to go "no food" then maybe you could try taking that in pieces. Like no junk or no white stuff or no sugar. Totally eliminating some of those things could, I think, be a good way to start. And of course, that's really what we're in for over the long haul, right? Either eliminating those empty calories or scaling back permanently to a degree most of us don't want to think about. I've never met someone my size who only eats fruits, veggies, whole grains and drinks water. It's that other stuff that got us where we are and that's the stuff we have to get under control.


Excellent idea traci! I totally agree that that would make the most sense.

In my mind, if I could have stayed on a liquid diet for a month or 2, I could have stayed on ANY diet for a month or 2. Know what I mean?

I say go for it though, (but only after talking to your Doctor or Registered Dietitian). If you can actually do it, and sustain it then there is no doubt in my mind that you will be able to follow any plan to maintaince. :D Like another poster said, it will be a very socially lonely way to live, but if you can commit...then that is 3/4 of the battle.

Jae165
08-28-2009, 09:28 AM
I have done slim-fast twice in my life but I think I couldn't even get that to work. I have a real problem with food, I need it! I've not considered a liquid diet only because I'm scared of doing harm to by body by messing up my thyroid and other body parts and scared of not eating.

This so me, (but I didn't try slimfast). I am too scared to try something like this and I love food too much. That's why I weigh what I do.
It was all about learning that I can love food, but I needed to learn to love the food that will love me back and nurture me.

But this has to be a personal choice. It's about about a person's perspective. Everyone doesn't look at a situation the same. I know you want to jump start your weight loss but at what cost. Maybe take some of the suggestions here of eliminating certain things from your diet or try the meal replacement for just one meal a day. Use it at the time of the day you find you have that "mindless eating" feeling and are not as focus and just want to grab and go.

Also, if I was you I would consider getting a buddy to check in with everyday. This site is really great and I am sure you can find someone or an accountability thread that will help you get through. That alone has helped me sooo much.

Good luck with whatever you decide.

kaplods
08-28-2009, 09:38 AM
Personally, I believe "kick-starts" are more often than not a horrible idea. I've been on several semi-fast over the past four decades, though I don't think I've ever made it past three weeks without solid food. In the long run, I think vlcd's (very low calorie diets) are more likely to set a person up for failure than success. I think they mess with hunger control and metabolism over time, and yet can become difficult to resist (at least in the short term), but impossible to maintain in the long run - setting up a cycle of crash dieting and overeating. As in gambling, early "wins" can overshadow the fact that the activity generally isn't productive in the long term. Sure it's great to see the weight come of quickly, but it doesn't translate into greater motivation when it's time to go off the fast, and try to learn new more moderate eating habits.

It's a bit like thinking that running as fast as you posibly can for the first ten minutes is going to give you the edge when running a marathon. More than likely you're just going to find yourself too exhausted to continue the race.

Transitioning back to solid food or increasing food intake to a moderate calorie diet is going to generally result in an initial gain (if only from the weight of the undigested food in the intestines). This initial gain and the much reduced rate of loss that will follow can be extremely demotivating, generally overshadowing any "boost" that the kickstart provided.

SwimGirl
08-28-2009, 09:39 AM
I actually think liquid cleanses have their place, and I've done quite a few in my lifetime. But I wouldn't think about doing it for a month or two, I couldn't handle it. I like food way too much! I also enjoy mindless snacking, and plan for it. I was off work yesterday, ate one meal, and the rest was snacking.. I was even below my calorie allowance for the day!

I think liquid cleanses should be more for cleansing, not for trying to lose weight. All of mine have been supervised - except for Slim Fast which I did for 3 days when I was 17. And I did them for health reason's. So if it's your health you are concerned about, I say go for it, and make sure you are supervised on it, but for losing weight? It's not going to be that effective in my experience. My MIL did the master cleanser for 3 months (with her doctors consent), she lost 2-4 pounds per week, and then gained it ALL back when she stopped it. BUT she no longer has GERD, which is why she did it.

Good luck with your decision, and remember you do have options. I think weight loss is the hardest thing I've encountered in my life, but you ARE strong enough to do it. It's just about finding the right equation for you.

-Aimee

nelie
08-28-2009, 09:58 AM
There are valid, liquid diet plans that are doctor supervised. They actually don't have a really good success rate over the long term though. Optifast is probably one of the most popular and the one that Oprah did way back when. Even Medifast calls for one regular meal per day with whatever shakes you drink during the day.

The shakes in a liquid only diet are formulated in such a way to give you all the nutrients that you require. Commercial shakes on the market aren't really designed to do that.

I also personally believe that it is hard to get all the right nutrients and antioxidants and good stuff if you are drinking a shake of some sort for multiple meals. I used to do a shake here and there for snacks or breakfast but real food is my focus.

Onederchic
08-28-2009, 10:49 AM
No, for myself, I would not consider it.

Jen
08-28-2009, 11:26 AM
Thanks to the people who gave me thoughtful advice and no thanks to the person who called me insane or to the person who referred hospital staff as being candidates for the biggest loser (I guess I am one of them because I am a RN working in a hospital). Most of the diet advice people have given I have tried, if you look at my name on the left side of your screen you'll see I'm a fairly long time member here, weight loss is something I've been struggling with for a long time. This supplement that I am talking about is not something that you can buy off the shelf of the local grocery store, it has to be ordered from the pharmacy. It is nutritionally balanced for protein, carbs, fat, fiber, vitamins and minerals. You literally do not need anything else to live. I know about the need to chew, my husband had that problem when we did the master cleanse but I was perfectly fine without it. All the other issues that were brought up were things I have already thought of and made plans for. My plan is to do this for 1 month to begin with and see how things are going and another month if things are going well. 2 months maximum because this stuff is not cheap. Then after 2 months I will gradually reintroduce real food into my diet and phase the supplement out. I do happen to think that kick starts work for diets, this is not a starvation diet by any means, the supplements will give me the # of calories that I need. Don't you guys think that if I could stick to a certain # of calories that I would be at the weight I am? I know I don't have a ticker but I'm not in the 100 lbs club just for giggles. This is something I truly believe I can stick to seeing the success that I had with the master cleanse I know I can stick to drinking something and not be enticed to eat what I shouldn't eat. Anyway thanks again for the posts and I'll let you know how it goes!

kiramira
08-28-2009, 11:39 AM
Hi hon:

It sounds like you've thought this out and IMHO your plan sure would work! And depending on the program, like GANGBUSTERS. Been there, done it!

But the bigger challenge as I'm sure you already know is HOW do you keep the weight off? Because in my experience, these type of super-restrictive diets are effective for getting the weight off. They don't teach you about how to manage food and real life eating situations at all. So when you go back to eating, it is hard to figure out HOW you should be eating. And this leads to weight gain, frustration, and giving up...

It is a personal path: go for it with proper medical supervision if you choose to, but be aware that keeping the weight off will be tricky once you come off plan. But I KNOW you've thought about this -- let us know how it goes! Best of luck.

:hug:

Kira

Tai
08-28-2009, 12:03 PM
Many years ago I went to a hospital to hear about their medically supervised liquid diet program. They were very honest with me and I appreciated that. They said the biggest challenges patients faced were transitioning back to food and maintaining. Also, many people found they really missed chewing. This particular program had a lot of support including an exercising program. In the end I was not able to afford it and knew that I probably could not stick to it.

It sounds like maybe you've made up your mind so I want to wish you good luck! Like many others here I lost my weight through calorie counting, but it's not for everyone.

Lyn2007
08-28-2009, 12:50 PM
It can be hard to stick to a certain number of calories if you have no real guidelines about what you can and cannot eat. For me, I get all whacko when I make a food off limits. I want it all the time. I get panicky about it. But if I have a "treat" day I binge. So I've struggled with how to handle this.

Sometimes I just get so SICK of thnking about food that I switch to shakes for several meals. Yes, I could just say "I may have 300 calories of anything I want for lunch" instead but then I get crazy thinking of all the possibilities and end up eating a whole pizza. But then, I have Binge Eating Disorder so this may not be a problem for others.

So, it is simpler and takes the thinking out for me to have a liquid meal sometimes. I buy a whey based formula with vitamins in it. I add it to soy milk, or sometimes organic nonfat yogurt. I throw in some fruit and a huge handful of spinach. That way it is not just a manufactured shake... I add some healthy fresh stuff for antioxidants, etc.

Would I do that for months? No, but I might consider doing shakes all day and then a dinner of lean meat + veggies. Maybe.

Sandi
08-28-2009, 01:52 PM
Jen - I TOTALLY get this. Guys, Jen doesn't think that is a "fix-all", she knows that she will still have to deal with the food issues. It's about getting started and seeing some success and hoping that the success will help you stick to your food plan when you go off the liquid. It's about turning off all the cravings, turning off the choices and just going on auto-pilot for a while until she thinks she can handle making real choices.

Jen, I have thought about doing this a million times. But then I always think, man, if I can't stick to 1800 calories, then what makes me think I can/will stick to a liquid diet. Plus, for me, I have to do something that is forever. I personally need to make changes that I can/will stick to every day for the rest of my life. What is going to keep me going is the determination to do this.

Good Luck, hon. Let us know how it's going.

sunflowergirl68 - Sorry, but are you insane? Not cool.

ChrissyBean
08-28-2009, 03:11 PM
It wouldn't work for me on so many levels.

nelie
08-28-2009, 04:26 PM
Jen - I hope if you do choose to go down this path that it does help you. As others have mentioned it, maintenance is the issue. Many people have said it before: losing weight is (relatively) easy, it is maintaining the weight loss that is hard.

As always, we are here for you :hug:

GirlyGirlSebas
08-28-2009, 04:34 PM
Sometimes I just get so SICK of thnking about food that I switch to shakes for several meals. Yes, I could just say "I may have 300 calories of anything I want for lunch" instead but then I get crazy thinking of all the possibilities....
Yes, I understand. I believe this is why I find it easier to eat the same couple of things everyday for breakfast and lunch. Heck, I even have my favorite stand-bys for dinner. This makes the whole calorie counting/planning stuff much easier for me to deal with. As a matter of fact, I believe I've read in weight loss success stories that many people recommend this.

SnowboundChick
08-28-2009, 04:59 PM
You know i like a good kick start back into it every once in awhile. Good luck Jen, let us know how it goes.

Keillynsmom
08-28-2009, 05:57 PM
I've done it. Three times.

For me, it worked because I lost a lot of weight quickly (75lbs in 13 weeks) so I felt a lot better and I could be more active without pain. Using Optifast (medically supervised), it eliminated the food choices so I stopped thinking about what and when I was going to eat and that made following the fast much easier. There was also the support of the group and the staff.

The con is that I never ever learned how to eat correctly or appropriately and because I felt deprived for so long, it was easy to "take a vacation" from dieting and gain it all back. They did try to teach me how to eat. It also gave/gives me a false expectation for weight loss -- if I'm not losing 5 lbs a week, it feels slow and I get discouraged -- it's hard to feel good about 1 or 2 pounds.

Each time, I intended to start fresh with my eating habits but never did. I'm still trying.

TJFitnessDiva
08-28-2009, 07:00 PM
I've never considered doing a liquid only diet but it sounds like you thought it through & I hope it's something monitored by your doctor to make sure you are getting the complete nutrition you need....even if it's Rx'd.

Good luck!

Lyn2007
08-28-2009, 09:06 PM
I've been thinking some more about this post. Let me throw this out there for thoughts.

Sometimes I look at websites for people who've had bariatric surgery. I see their amazing, rapid losses and I think, "If I could just follow what THEY are ingesting, WITHOUT doing the surgery, I'd have the same rapid weight loss." Of course, it's complicated because obviously there are problems with regulating intake and that's partly why surgery is necessary. BUT, if it is reasonable for THEM to drink protein drinks for a couple of months to drop the weight... why is it not ok for the rest of us?

Simply put, if Girl#1 has surgery and then drinks x ounces of Y shake per day for 2 months, why couldn't it also work for Girl#2 ro drink x ounces of Y shake per day for 2 months?

nelie
08-28-2009, 09:44 PM
I think my comments may have been misconstrued. I don't want to get the topic off topic.

Jen :hug: I'm sorry someone made you feel unsupported. I think you have thought everything out and you seem to have a good plan. As I said before, we are here for you.

Suzanne 3FC
08-28-2009, 10:10 PM
Hi Jen :)

You've gotten a wide variety of opinions! This just goes to show that one diet doesn't fit all, and we are all so unique and need different things to reach the same goal. We've had a lot of members here do similar diets (not Weight Loss Surgery related) that have found great support here, and I hope you'll find the same thing :hug:

Sometimes it feels good to "distance" yourself from food. I tried Medifast for a little while and I never had to think about food, so food was not a temptation. I had the drinks and I had the "lean and green" meal daily. Unfortunately I had a reaction to the Medifast formula (due to a preexisting health condition) so I couldn't stay on it after several weeks. But it sure was easy while it lasted.

Hopefully you'll find something that works for you, and your jumpstart will be successful :hug:

harrismm
08-29-2009, 12:30 AM
I really dont have an opinion about a liquid diet.I am also a nurse and so many times I have been tempted to try a diet that promises great results...I have had to take my self back to all of the nutrition classes...and biology classes....and pharmacology classes to bring me back to reality.
I am sorry that you feel unsupported (if you do).I think, like anything, when you ask a question like this you need to prepare yourself for responses you might not like.With that being said, if you believe that this is the answer for you (which I sounds like you do), then I really shouldnt matter what others think.We are different people, living in different areas of the world, with different life experiences, raised with different values, different educational backgrounds.....Expect some debate people.Its not a bad thing.We can learn more from dialoge from people who have differing views than someone who is going to agree with everything you say.Can you imagine if you posted this same question and got 30 responses saying, "hey, great plan....Sounds great....go for it".We all see the world from a different pair of eyes.That is life.Its so discouraging to see people scoulded for giving their HONEST opinions.

suesully
08-29-2009, 01:15 AM
I've often thought that if I did a month or 2 of a liquid diet that it would kick start some weight loss. My issues are more around mindless eating than emotional eating.

To answer your question, YES.

I would caution on going the total liquid diet route without medical supervision. Even with that, gallbladder issues are common and the learning curve to eating is steep.

Instead, consider a hospital supervised HMR diet or Medifast or New Lifestyle Diet. There is a lot of info on these sites as well as here on 3FC (look for the Medifast folder).

These plans have a specific number of meal replacements (shakes, bars, puddings, soups and other meals) PLUS one healthy meal/day of lean protein & non-starchy veggies. That one meal/day is key to learning to eat properly and crucial for gallbladder health.

IMO, these diets are wonderful for those with 100+ pounds to lose. Losing a few pounds a month may work for those with 20-40#s to lose but for people whose weight loss goals involve losing 100#s or more that slow rate of weight loss can be very frustrating and unmotivating as time goes on.

The plans I mentioned will allow you to lose a large amount of weight quickly at first and that provides HUGE benefits immediately to your health and also in the motivation area.

I lost the majority of my weight using Medifast and then New Lifestyle Diet products when I discovered I had a sensitivity to soy. During this time I learned about proper portion control and grew accustomed to healthy food options from my healthy meal. I finished the last 30#s of my weight loss with a whole foods eating lifestyle.

Meal replacements can be a wonderful option...just do your research and follow a plan rather than trying it on your own. Good luck. :)

p.s. I've maintained my goal weight for over 18 months now.

sunflowergirl68
08-29-2009, 02:02 AM
There are valid, liquid diet plans that are doctor supervised. They actually don't have a really good success rate over the long term though. Optifast is probably one of the most popular and the one that Oprah did way back when. Even Medifast calls for one regular meal per day with whatever shakes you drink during the day.

The shakes in a liquid only diet are formulated in such a way to give you all the nutrients that you require. Commercial shakes on the market aren't really designed to do that.

I also personally believe that it is hard to get all the right nutrients and antioxidants and good stuff if you are drinking a shake of some sort for multiple meals. I used to do a shake here and there for snacks or breakfast but real food is my focus.

There are definitely legitimate liquid diets that are doctor-supervised... but most are for pre-surgery.

sunflowergirl68
08-29-2009, 02:04 AM
Jen - I TOTALLY get this. Guys, Jen doesn't think that is a "fix-all", she knows that she will still have to deal with the food issues. It's about getting started and seeing some success and hoping that the success will help you stick to your food plan when you go off the liquid. It's about turning off all the cravings, turning off the choices and just going on auto-pilot for a while until she thinks she can handle making real choices.

Jen, I have thought about doing this a million times. But then I always think, man, if I can't stick to 1800 calories, then what makes me think I can/will stick to a liquid diet. Plus, for me, I have to do something that is forever. I personally need to make changes that I can/will stick to every day for the rest of my life. What is going to keep me going is the determination to do this.

Good Luck, hon. Let us know how it's going.

sunflowergirl68 - Not cool.

And it's not safe to do a month or two of a liquid diet. What's not cool is risking your health to lose weight.

mandalinn82
08-29-2009, 02:16 AM
Medically supervised, low calorie liquid diets, with proper monitoring by your physician, composed of drinks with very specific and carefully balanced combinations of macro and micronutrients, are generally safe for otherwise healthy people who are obese or superobese. They do run a risk for a slightly higher risk of gallstone formation, but seem to provide very rapid control of blood sugar for people who are obese with comorbid diabetes (faster than dietary changes alone).

The key parts are Doctor Supervised and Carefully Balanced. Any doctor who prescribes a liquid diet should also be doing the appropriate follow up (and you should check them out carefully...if they're offering human growth hormone or other injections, run! Run far away!), and an all-Slimfast diet isn't going to do it (they are formulated assuming you will eat some real food in the day, not only the shakes). BUT, if you have a reputable physician supervising you in a liquid diet that is formulated as a total-diet replacement, and you and your doctor agree that the risks of gallstone formation and metabolism effect that exist are outweighed by the potential benefits of quick weight loss, liquid diets are a viable approach.

Now, maintenance is an issue. A lot of the commercial programs out there include a transition phase to learn to eat real foods again, so if you are going to move forward with this, you may want to check on your options with that. And, I really can't stress this enough, doctor-supervised is a MUST. If you're going to meet the nutritional needs of the body on a very low calorie liquid diet, it needs to be recommended and monitored by your doctor.

Rosinante
08-29-2009, 02:42 AM
I've certainly considered it, even done it for a while, although not under proper supervision, it was in the olden days, even before Slimfast. Can't remember what it was called, and when I taste protein powder shakes these days, the taste seems exactly the same. I felt full and great and I'm sure I must have lost weight but it's the old 'and keeping it off' problem. Also, and there's no delicate way to put this, it gave me terrific constipation. tmi?

A couple of years ago, I knew someone who did the Cambridge diet, which was entirely liquid to start with. Don't think it was medically supervised as such but she had to join a support group and attend classes to look at the emotional side of things too. They gradually weaned her off it and on to real food but she was the best part of a year with only gloppy things. She lost a lot, last time I saw her she'd regained a little but was maintaining at that. So: clearly doable but not for me, my insides can't cope.

nelie
08-29-2009, 09:58 AM
There are definitely legitimate liquid diets that are doctor-supervised... but most are for pre-surgery.

I wouldn't say most are, some are. The ones I was thinking of specifically aren't for pre-surgery such as Optifast.

Lyn2007
08-29-2009, 12:50 PM
As to the issue of 'safety' and not getting enough nutrients via a liquid diet...

For me, if I were to go with a liquid protein shake type thing, it most certainly would be more nutritionally sound and safe than the diet of complete crap I have been eating for the past decade. If eating cake for breakfast, hot dogs, chips and Coke for lunch, and a Big mac Meal for dinner (punctuated by Little Debbie cakes all day long) for ten years didn't kill me, I doubt a protein drink with vitamins would. Somehow, I'd think that *has* to be better than what some of us *used* to eat.

Just sayin'.

Jen
08-31-2009, 02:49 PM
Going back to what a couple of people said about feeling not supportive, I don't think that at all what I do think is that people don't actually completely read my posts. They skim through, don't digest what I am saying and then throw up a reply. I know I've probably done my fair share of that as well but there have been many times that I've typed something and then not posted it. I get frustrated reading posts that clearly illustrate the posters really didn't read my post.

Thanks to the people who have been supportive, who have completely read what I posted and understand what I am getting at. I really do understand people's concerns and no one has brought up any topics that I haven't already thought of.

I think a lot of people automatically think of Oprah when they think of liquid diet and believe me I don't want to lose a bunch of weight and gain it back. That would be far worse in so many ways than not having lost the weight to begin with! I think liquid diets are a weight loss tool, the same as any other weight loss method and the success depends on how well the tool is utilized. Obviously I am going to gain all the weight back if I can't figure out how to eat properly, I am doing this to break myself of all my bad habits. Probably I will discover more bad habits as I go along. I know that mindless eating is one, I'm certain there are others that will rear their ugly heads and it will be a lightbulb moment for me.

Anyway I am starting this all tomorrow and I think I will start a blog, if you are interested to see how I am doing you can check out my blog here on 3FC.

run2bstrong
08-31-2009, 02:55 PM
We were designed with teeth for a reason. We need to chew in order to help satisfy our hunger.

Onederchic
08-31-2009, 02:58 PM
We were designed with teeth for a reason. We need to chew in order to help satisfy our hunger.


I thought it was to bite people who make us mad :o :p :rofl:

kiramira
08-31-2009, 03:01 PM
what I do think is that people don't actually completely read my posts. They skim through, don't digest what I am saying and then throw up a reply. I know I've probably done my fair share of that as well but there have been many times that I've typed something and then not posted it. I get frustrated reading posts that clearly illustrate the posters really didn't read my post.

Amen to THIS!

Your blog is going to be amazing and I'm sure alot of us will be reading it...

:hug:

Kira

Jen
08-31-2009, 03:01 PM
We were designed for a lot of things and sadly obesity seems to be one of them if we don't exercise our brain properly. I'm using a diet tool to help reset my brain and my stomach and if I have to leave off chewing for awhile it'll be worth it. BTW I think I chew way to fast to even appreciate what I am eating so maybe taking a break from chewing will help me to appreciate the whole dining experience. Also when I did the master cleanse I went 10 days without chewing and it didn't make a difference as far as my hunger was concerned. I drank my lemonade drink and water and when my belly was full I wasn't hungry anymore.

kiramira
08-31-2009, 03:11 PM
Ms Onder! :rofl:

Kira

GirlyGirlSebas
08-31-2009, 03:16 PM
We were designed with teeth for a reason. We need to chew in order to help satisfy our hunger.

You are joking. Right?

david
08-31-2009, 03:23 PM
i dont know about the medical implications, but i think its important to do a plan that you can stick to for a lifetime...even when i did jenny craig i lost all the weight really fast, but i was hungry all the time...my wife says i would come in slam the door... open the refrigerator, slam it...open the microwave, slam it...i was always just waiting for the next meal...i know i wasnt learning anything from that...even though we want to climb that mountain as fast as we can, i think the reality is that we need to do it in a slow manageable manner with the big picture in mind

Jen
08-31-2009, 03:28 PM
David I couldn't agree with you more! That has been the main reason I have not done a lot of popular diets and things like Jenny Craig because I knew they were not something I could stick to for more than 1 day. This is meant to be a temporary thing only and I am going to transition myself to regular healthy food at the end of it, designing a way of eating that I can stick to for the rest of my life.

JulieJ08
08-31-2009, 03:40 PM
You are joking. Right?

I doubt it.

Google Cephalic Phase Digestive Response. It's interesting stuff.

sunflowergirl68
09-01-2009, 12:47 AM
As to the issue of 'safety' and not getting enough nutrients via a liquid diet...

For me, if I were to go with a liquid protein shake type thing, it most certainly would be more nutritionally sound and safe than the diet of complete crap I have been eating for the past decade. If eating cake for breakfast, hot dogs, chips and Coke for lunch, and a Big mac Meal for dinner (punctuated by Little Debbie cakes all day long) for ten years didn't kill me, I doubt a protein drink with vitamins would. Somehow, I'd think that *has* to be better than what some of us *used* to eat.

Just sayin'.

But you can go on a non-all liquid diet and not eat that stuff. That's my point. I understand what you're saying, but that isn't necessarily true. You'd be malnourished either way (if you prolong the liquid diet).

sunflowergirl68
09-01-2009, 12:49 AM
We were designed for a lot of things and sadly obesity seems to be one of them if we don't exercise our brain properly. I'm using a diet tool to help reset my brain and my stomach and if I have to leave off chewing for awhile it'll be worth it. BTW I think I chew way to fast to even appreciate what I am eating so maybe taking a break from chewing will help me to appreciate the whole dining experience. Also when I did the master cleanse I went 10 days without chewing and it didn't make a difference as far as my hunger was concerned. I drank my lemonade drink and water and when my belly was full I wasn't hungry anymore.

And if you're going to do that (go on a prolonged liquid diet), I really hope you talk to your doctor about it.

kiahna23
09-01-2009, 04:45 PM
I guess I just don't understand how drinking your food will make you lose weight vs eating it. You don't eat junk food (and limit starches) and limit your portions (and exercise), and you'll lose weight.

The only thing I have a problem with is risking one's health to lose weight. No one should ever consider doing that.

havent been on here in a while...anyhow...seems like your directing your answer at me...doesnt surprise me...but DRINKING my food was easier because I didnt have to be like "ok I ate 5 pieces of this of that today"...I drank it..It was easier for me to maintain..My doctor said it was okay since I wasnt obese.I actually lost weight vs now..Im at a stand still..So the difference is results not just talking....I lost weight and kept it off..Im at 135 now...And NOT considered overweight....My colon is cleaner and actually works daily (something it never did) and my body feels better...My doctor is the one who recommended it.... He said "get a juicer and juice your food since you wont remember to eat it".....This worked for me....I answered her question..she wanted opinions...and I gave her mine...

MugCanDoIt
09-01-2009, 05:31 PM
No, I keep thinking of Oprah and her wagon load of fat. It all came back.

sunflowergirl68
09-01-2009, 08:49 PM
@kiahna23: Nope, wasn't directing my answer at you, or anyone. It was a general thought for the thread. But thanks for your input. I guess I just can't imagine doing that for all of my meals... one, sure. Have a small Jamba Juice. But my whole day? i would go nuts for sure.

DeeinVaBeach
09-03-2009, 09:37 AM
Having read the whole thread... I appreciate the differing opinions on liquid diets.. I have to say, my doctor put me on Prescriptfit at one point, and I stuck with it for quite a while, unfortunately, my husband being in Iraq and holidays and depression all combined to derail me good.. but i've been thinking about going back on it.. It is a doctor supervised program that starts with a liquid only phase (either soups, puddings, or shakes) and each phase can be the length that you and your doctor feel is appropriate, from 3 days to two weeks.. then the next time period, you add back in one food group, such as poultry... it has a neat little calendar that goes with it and explains what you can add and when.. I found while I was on it that it was easy to maintain, and taught me about better eating habits as I added my food groups back in... so yeah.. liquid diets can be a great kickstart, as long as you are doing it with a doctor's help and knowing realistically that it will still be hard work, and that you are just using it as a reset button to help you kickstart some weight loss and get a handle on eating...

sorry for the rambling,

kiahna23
09-04-2009, 04:26 AM
@kiahna23: Nope, wasn't directing my answer at you, or anyone. It was a general thought for the thread. But thanks for your input. I guess I just can't imagine doing that for all of my meals... one, sure. Have a small Jamba Juice. But my whole day? i would go nuts for sure.

Well I thought you were since you actually said "I guess I dont understand how drinking your food makes you lose weight vs eating it"....my mistake....But it works...Mostly because it was all fruits and veggies and I got my protein in the form of a shake as well...At first I felt like I was starving because I was use to stuffing myself...something I still sadly do...lol...But it worked..I did it after the master cleanse....May countries fast...it even says in the bible to do it...to get closer to God? Im not sure why....Its not for weightloss though...try a juicer...you wont regret it...If you can stick to it....Im going to do it again..for 2 weeks or so...I cant do it much after that...Everyone eating meals and Im eating juice? I would give in...

kiahna23
09-04-2009, 04:30 AM
Having read the whole thread... I appreciate the differing opinions on liquid diets.. I have to say, my doctor put me on Prescriptfit at one point, and I stuck with it for quite a while, unfortunately, my husband being in Iraq and holidays and depression all combined to derail me good.. but i've been thinking about going back on it.. It is a doctor supervised program that starts with a liquid only phase (either soups, puddings, or shakes) and each phase can be the length that you and your doctor feel is appropriate, from 3 days to two weeks.. then the next time period, you add back in one food group, such as poultry... it has a neat little calendar that goes with it and explains what you can add and when.. I found while I was on it that it was easy to maintain, and taught me about better eating habits as I added my food groups back in... so yeah.. liquid diets can be a great kickstart, as long as you are doing it with a doctor's help and knowing realistically that it will still be hard work, and that you are just using it as a reset button to help you kickstart some weight loss and get a handle on eating...

sorry for the rambling,

your not rambling :hug: ....but good luck though...in whatever you choose...Liquid diets help me get out of plateaus...I was at 165 at a point and did the liquid dieting and went down to 148....I dont want to lose much more weight....My body is pretty small and I have no breast anymore (their a B cup)...lol....GOOD LUCK! Post your progress and what you choose....

:carrot::carrot::carrot::carrot::carrot::carrot::c arrot::carrot: