LA Weight Loss - Most effective diet?




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summersbluepits
08-11-2009, 03:40 PM
What seems to be the most effective diet on this forum? Just curious...........


Cebsme
08-11-2009, 03:43 PM
The most effective diet is the one that you stick to.

I know you probably want a better answer than that but it is the true answer.

Some people do well with diets that have food restrictions (Atkins, South Beach, Ect)
Some people do well with no food restrictions but limits the amount of food you consume (Calorie Counting, Weight Watchers, Fasting Cycling)

You have to find what fits your lifestyle, your tastes, and your abilities.

TJFitnessDiva
08-11-2009, 03:47 PM
The most effective diet is the one that you stick to.

I know you probably want a better answer than that but it is the true answer.

Some people do well with diets that have food restrictions (Atkins, South Beach, Ect)
Some people do well with no food restrictions but limits the amount of food you consume (Calorie Counting, Weight Watchers, Fasting Cycling)

You have to find what fits your lifestyle, your tastes, and your abilities.

Yes...what she said :)


Thighs Be Gone
08-11-2009, 03:47 PM
I so agree with Ceb. Everyone must find their groove and what works for them.

I am a calorie counter.

kiahna23
08-11-2009, 04:00 PM
I am switching to soy and doing the P90X...no red meats...less carbs and a colon cleanse...It made me lose 20lbs in 2 months.

Thighs Be Gone
08-11-2009, 04:04 PM
I am switching to soy and doing the P90X...no red meats...less carbs and a colon cleanse...It made me lose 20lbs in 2 months.

Red meat is one of the only things I absolutely don't eat--been a looong time. In fact, mainly I eat fish--rarely anything else. I have discovered meat and most especially RED meat, doesn't do well inside me.

beerab
08-11-2009, 04:13 PM
Yeah really it's hard to say cuz I've tried south beach, atkins, and even Fat Smash but the only thing that has worked for me is counting my calories and then cooking more at home and eating less processed food.

bargoo
08-11-2009, 04:18 PM
I am a calorie counter, too , however I don't think of it as limiting the amouint of food I can eat. Calorie counting limits the number of calories that you can eat. You can actually eat quite a lot of food as long as you stay within your calorie allotment. And I have done many other diets. Calorie counting works best for me.

Cebsme
08-11-2009, 04:26 PM
Maybe I misspoke(wrote) however yes calorie counting does in a way limit the amount of food you eat. You can eat more depending on what types of food you eat, but it still limits it by some means, which is what I was referring to when I was pointed out those types of diets.

I am a calorie counter too.

kaplods
08-11-2009, 05:21 PM
For me, low carb is the most effective in the sense that I lose most rapidly and consistently on a low carb diet. That being said, there are some side effects that go along with very low carb diet that I don't like. So I need a plan that's low carb, not not so low that I get headaches, dizziness and other symptoms of low blood sugar. Too high carb a diet (even "good" carbs from whole foods) and I'm hungry all of the time, and prone to retaining water. I also tend to want to include more carbs than is good for me, so I sometimes struggle with what is good for me vs what I enjoy most. I'm still in the process (and may always be) of trying to find the happy middleground.

I can't say that any of that applies to you. If someone had an answer that applied to everyone, he or she would win a Nobel prize, and would soon be the wealthiest person on the planet.

You've got to know yourself very well to find the answer for you. That doesn't mean you won't lose weight during the process of finding the right plan for you. It generally boils down to trial and error. What do you need and desire in a food/exercise plan, both in the short-term and "forever?"

Is convenience important to you?
Are you willing to cook and try new foods?
Are you willing to document or count everything you eat?
Are there foods or food types you're not willing to eat?
Do you have food triggers, foods that you have difficulty eating moderately?
Do you have blood sugar issues or insulin resistance?
Do you overeat out of hunger, boredom, in response to emotional stress?

These are only some of the questions that can help you find the plan that is right for you.

If you google "nutritional typing" or "diet typing," you will find a lot of online quizzes that are designed to help you find the proportion of macro nutrients (protein, carbs, fat) that's right for you. I find the theory interesting, but I wouldn't consider it "proven" at this point - at least not that it's necessarily more effective than good old trial and error.

The beauty of calorie, WW point, and exchange plan programs is that you can adapt to any proportion of nutrients (or ignore the issue altoghether if you wish).

My personal theory is to start with the least restrictive, easiest to follow plan, and tweak only as necessary.

I've had to do a lot of tweaking, but "one tweak at a time," insures that I am comfortable with the changes I'm making. I think if you make too many changes, and then find out the plan isn't practical for you, it can be difficult to decide which component didn't fit into your life.

Ultimately, I don't think it matters where you start, as long as you start somewhere.

kiramira
08-11-2009, 09:50 PM
Meh, I'm of the other school of thought from Ms Kaplods. I think if you want to get there any time soon, ya gotta really soul search and get on with it. If I spent time tweaking and tweaking and tweaking, I'd still be over 200 lbs. And my SIL God Love Her is of the school of moderation -- and she has moderated herself to NOWHERES because she's afraid of making the changes that are NEEDED. She's more comfortable doing things slowly, and as a result, she just isn't getting there, and she's been "doing things in moderation" for the past 25 years without any result.

Don't get me wrong -- anything super restrictive won't generally be successful in the long term especially if you won't be able to maintain it in the long run. Plans like Medifast generally fall into this category for me at least -- quick results, quick regain because I didn't learn a whole lot.

But alot of those maintainers and people who have been really, really successful have HAD to make RADICAL changes. Some have ruled out sugar; others have chosen vegetarianism; others have ruled out what they consider to be junk food; others have ruled out dairy -- but they all have had to make tough decisions and have lived by them. They have made the decision that certain behaviours aren't productive, and make the gutsy decision to behave completely differently. Right now. Because to start small and make changes gradually is IMHO often an excuse NOT to change -- to make things easy and comfortable, to stay in a comfort zone that just isn't, well, healthy or productive, and to SAY that they have chosen to deal with a weight issue without REALLY dealing with it.

There are stories here of people who have lost huge amounts of weight BECAUSE they made the drastic changes NECESSARY. It was hard, it was uncomfortable, it was challenging, but when you hit a brick wall you can either STOP and stay comfortable, or you can MOVE RIGHT ON THROUGH IT and get results. Those who believe in moderation and gradual changes tend see the brick wall IMHO, and then ponder it and try to gradually either scale it or move around it which in my experience just means wasted time and effort with little or no results.

IMHO the most successful diet is the one that you can sustain, but it might mean a radical overhaul of how you view food, what you choose to fuel your body, and how you define yourself -- all radical stuff that takes guts and determination...but difficult times call for difficult decisions, and if you are at that point where you are sick and tired of being sick and tired, you just gotta say "ENOUGH" and JUST. DO. IT.

JMHO.
Kira

CountingDown
08-11-2009, 10:44 PM
It has already been said.
The most effective diet is
1 - something you can sustain
2 - something that can become a lifestyle change - in other words, something you can do forever

For me, calorie counting is the way to go. I HATE deprivation. Tell me I can't have it, and I want it all the more. Portion control is a must for me. All things in moderation works for me.

I eat very healthy foods 90 percent of the time. The other 10 percent is stuff that I love and that I have worked into my plan (red wine, dark chocolate, pizza, ice cream, etc.)

So, while all things in moderation works for me, the key is that some foods need a LOT of moderation ;)

I agree with Colleen - I tweaked my plan as I went along. If you read my goal story, you will see that I followed a cycle: plan, execute, gather data, evaluate, repeat cycle. As I lost weight, my plan changed. As my journey continues, my plan changes. This is a journey - with new twists and turns along the way.

MoragMunch
08-11-2009, 10:50 PM
Wow, I have to agree with Kiramira even though it is very hard to admit.

I have, over the past week, intentionally lowered my calorie intake to a low enough level to ensure that I am hungry -- I did this in an attempt to figure out why I have the relationship I do to food, why I am so afraid of being hungry, and WHY I am so addicted to food.

What I am discovering is beyond anything I ever thought I would. After about two days of barely eating, I realized that I had no idea between the difference of hunger and thirst. When I could barely stand drinking water, now I crave it like I used to crave chocolate. I have realized what a gift water is to my body in a way that I never would have before. The understanding is coming to me that food, while it should be enjoyed, is really just a tool. I have felt the anger, the sadness, all of it that I have covered up for years by overeating. And as I keep myself hungry, these emotions have been coming up and I have had to deal with them. Now I look at cravings as and indication that my emotional self is trying to tell me.

So yes, a radical overhaul. I hope developing a new relationship with food will stop me from the yo yo dieting.

kiahna23
08-11-2009, 10:55 PM
Red meat is one of the only things I absolutely don't eat--been a looong time. In fact, mainly I eat fish--rarely anything else. I have discovered meat and most especially RED meat, doesn't do well inside me.

me too! lol.. i love rainbow trout....red meat make me gain and keep weight for a whole week and it backs me up (no bowel movements)....

Shelley
08-11-2009, 10:59 PM
What seems to be the most effective diet on this forum? Just curious...........

I just started MRC a month ago, I am 54 and was 200lbs overweight. Something had to change and I finally surrendered years of overeating, (as a misplaced coping skill). Something just clicked this time. Now, I agree the best diet is one you can stick to. For me though it is not just a diet. I am changing my life by the decisions I make. I have to remind myself of that often. I, with the help of God (cause I can't do it alone), am changing my life and my lifestyle. I wish you success too. God Bless!

Ija
08-12-2009, 12:23 AM
Because to start small and make changes gradually is IMHO often an excuse NOT to change -- to make things easy and comfortable, to stay in a comfort zone that just isn't, well, healthy or productive, and to SAY that they have chosen to deal with a weight issue without REALLY dealing with it.

As pretty much everyone else has already said, I think it's important to find something you can stick with for life. However, I have to respectfully disagree with Kiramira on the point I quoted above. Starting small and making changes gradually is how I finally managed to put an end to destructive yo-yo dieting and become healthy and fit. I've literally lost more than half of myself.

Some people might like taking huge leaps, but for others, small steps work just fine ;)

Best of luck!

mandalinn82
08-12-2009, 12:50 AM
There are stories here of people who have lost huge amounts of weight BECAUSE they made the drastic changes NECESSARY. It was hard, it was uncomfortable, it was challenging, but when you hit a brick wall you can either STOP and stay comfortable, or you can MOVE RIGHT ON THROUGH IT and get results. Those who believe in moderation and gradual changes tend see the brick wall IMHO, and then ponder it and try to gradually either scale it or move around it which in my experience just means wasted time and effort with little or no results.


I made small changes, which added up, and became bigger changes. And IMHO, there are LOTS of ways to change a lifestyle, all at once or by degrees, and both ways work (and both ways are well represented in the Maintainers forum)

kaplods
08-12-2009, 01:33 AM
As pretty much everyone else has already said, I think it's important to find something you can stick with for life. However, I have to respectfully disagree with Kiramira on the point I quoted above. Starting small and making changes gradually is how I finally managed to put an end to destructive yo-yo dieting and become healthy and fit. I've literally lost more than half of myself.

Some people might like taking huge leaps, but for others, small steps work just fine ;)

Best of luck!

I've also found this to be true for myself, as well. In three and a half decades of dieting, I never tried gradual changes because like Kiramira, I thought only radical changes were legitimate. Gradual changes were for people who weren't intelligent, strong or commited.

Boy was I wrong. In a sense, it was like early settlers in wagon trains who tried to take the "short cut" over the mountains (against the advice of more experienced travelers) rather than the "long way" around the mountain. The short way seemed the fastest, but it was difficult to travel and treacherous, and very often many or all of the people that went the "short way" (if they didn't turn back) died, because of it.

Taking the long way isn't a cop-out or a sign of weakness. Making gradual changes is as legitimate as the short way - and may even have health advantages over radical changes. It certainly has had psychological benefits for me.

While magazines and books now pay lip service to gradual changes, I find that in general, the gradual path isn't given much respect. This doesn't have to be a race, and I get so frustrated that it still is so taboo to choose a different path than the typical crash and yoyo dieting. Magazines still offer cover stories about losing large amounts of weight in a month, a week, a weekend! It's just insane.

3FC is the only place that I've encountered people willing to talk about the "long way" to lose weight, and there are many examples (as in the wagon train days) where people found that longer way, actualy was quicker than the shortcut (if this is to be compared to a race, the turtle does have a chance). Moving around obstacles can be a lot easier than trying to plow through them (the analogy of a brick wall, is a good one - often running at a brick wall, trying to break through it, only results in severe injury. Scaling it or walking around it, isn't a bad idea). If you have the power to walk through walls, more power to you, but walking around, or climing over is ok too.

summersbluepits
08-12-2009, 01:31 PM
Shelley that's teh diet I am on too. I tried it last year but couldn't stick with it. I'm HOPING this time I can! I am going on vacation next week though and am very nervous about 5 days of eating out!!!!!!!!!!!!!

summersbluepits
08-12-2009, 01:35 PM
Wow half your weight that is amazing! Thanx all for posting.........
I know that I did Jenny and lost great on it, but got sick on the food when I was prego and can't eat it now so that is out LOL. I know MRC works GREAT for me WHEN I can stick to it, I lose 5 lbs every week, but sticking to it I have a hard time. I have to remember in TEN WEEKS I could be at goal and surely I can eat anything for TEN WEEKS RIGHT!

I've never been one to stick with things so I think gradual for me would be bad...............I'd lose interest and forget like I do with everything else. I'm an all or nothing type person, though I totally see the validity in gradual changes.

Just was trying to come up with a back up plan in case I fail again at MRC. I always go back to the Mountain Dew. It is so hard to overcome a soda addiction, I gave up cigs MUCH easier than soda!

mygritsconfessions
08-12-2009, 01:52 PM
Over the years I have done WW, Jenny, Atkins, Pills, Gyms and much, much more. The only thing that worked for me was just simplifying. I count calories, eat healthier and exercise by going out the front door walking the neighborhood. Its alot cheaper simplifying too!

kiramira
08-12-2009, 02:50 PM
It isn't a question of legitimacy of small changes, and it isn't a question of placing value judgements on the paths people choose. It isn't a question of racing to lose weight. I think the boat was missed here.

What I am saying, obviously not too clearly, is that to be successful, you need a plan that works within your lifestyle, that you can work and sustaine effectively, and you need to fundamentally shift a number of things in your life. The advice to make a small change, observe, tweak and so on MAY work for some but not many. And I acknowledge that this isn't a race -- I never said it was! But 100% dedication and consistency to your plan is necessary. And it doesn't mean that you won't grow and adjust your plan accordingly. HOWEVER, in order to be effective, there HAS to be some sort of radical change in thought process or else you will stay mired in moderation. If you accept and expect moderation, then you will get exactly those results. Whether it be in academics, athletics, or personal goals -- if you live by the rule of moderation, you WILL recieve mediocrity in return. IMHO. There aren't a whole lot of C students who get into med school: there aren't a whole lot of average runners who work out twice a week that get to the Olympics...

There ARE many stories that I have read by people on the forum who were severely overweight and sedentary. They are now where they want to be and are fit. All of them did this through changing SOMETHING drastically --their perception of exercise, their food intake, heck if you decide to calorie count, this is pretty significant! More so than saying, well, this month I'll eat only light cream cheese and see what happens.

I guess the best measure of effectiveness if the OP is interested is to find a few of us whose stories touch her during their weight loss phase and just watch. You'll figure out pretty quickly what philosophy and path an individual has chosen. You'll learn who has eliminated sugar from the diet (pretty radical), who has become vegetarian/vegan (pretty radical), who is taking the C25K program (pretty radical for a sedentary person), who is counting calorie and controlling their intake (pretty radical for us former free-form eaters), those who have eliminated junk food from their diet, those who refuse to eat any processed foods, those who exercise 5 or 6 times a week, and so on, and those who choose minor changes and live in a state of moderation. And now do something which I'm sure will make people uncomfortable to even suggest: follow the tickers. That's a pretty clear indication of whether the plan is effective for a person or not. Otherwise, why would we have tickers? It serves as a public record of progress...I guarantee you that the ones willing to make the most change, who are most open to self-examination, and who are willing to break out of their self-definitions instead of spending years in moderation are winning the battle. Then read the maintainers' stories. You'll see who again has eliminated sugar, or gone organic, or found fitness as their motivator. I guarantee you that you won't see very many who spent 25 years living in moderation to reach a goal...And finally, read the posts of our maintainers, because you'll soon see who has redefined themselves and who is still living within the parameters and thought patterns of their larger selves. THIS will help you decide exactly what path you want to take and how you choose to live the rest of your life...sounds harsh, I know, but SOMETIMES a dose of reality isn't a bad thing...

I'm just saying...

Kira

nelie
08-12-2009, 03:10 PM
I don't know, maybe I'm not winning the battle but I have to say all the changes in the past years I view as being an evolution.

At my highest weight, I started exercising regularly, which wasn't a drastic change for me because I had exercised before and even exercised regularly. I stopped certain things like eating ice cream regularly which didn't seem so drastic. My diet change and evolved over time so that I went towards a whole foods diet. Eventually I got tired of meat and I wasn't eating much cheese anyway due to high fat content and one day I decided to follow a vegan diet. It actually didn't seem so drastic to me because I was already going that way.

I think small changes can definitely add up and there is a lot of tweaking. My habits 6 years ago are drastic compared to my habits today but it didn't happen over night and I may not be at goal so I may not be considered a success by some but I thank small changes adding up to where I am today.

midwife
08-12-2009, 03:10 PM
Re: radical vs. moderate changes/baby steps, I think it is important to point out that one doesn't need all the answers from Day 1. My own plan has evolved and changed over the years. I started out calorie counting and running and now I follow an exchange type program of whole foods and I run and lift weights. Foods that I used to eat that fell into my calorie range are not part of my plan any longer and I don't count calories now, I just try to meet certain protein/veggie/fat/carb targets. So start out with something that makes sense to you and then you can tweak it from there.

Ija
08-12-2009, 04:57 PM
HOWEVER, in order to be effective, there HAS to be some sort of radical change in thought process or else you will stay mired in moderation. If you accept and expect moderation, then you will get exactly those results. Whether it be in academics, athletics, or personal goals -- if you live by the rule of moderation, you WILL recieve mediocrity in return.

Kira, I lost my first 40-50 pounds by making small changes one after another, like drinking diet soda instead of classic, eating a bagel with low fat cheese instead of regular, and buying M&M's once or twice a week instead of every day. As I dropped more and more weight, I started feeling better and better, which made me actually want to tweak things further. The evolution of my lifestyle was a very slow, gradual process, and was (yes, believe it or not) based on moderation. In fact, even now, as a healthy, active and fit woman who eats tons of clean, unprocessed foods, I still enjoy my diet soda, bagel, and M&M's... these things are just no longer the cornerstones of my diet.

Moderation has worked just fine for me, thanks. :)

emileigh
08-12-2009, 05:43 PM
Everyone is different in whether they make big changes or start with small changes. But I do agree with kiramira. There has to be a radical change in the thought process. Without a change in the thought process, a person simply drifts back into old patterns. The actual steps may be small but the decision to take those steps is major.

kaplods
08-12-2009, 05:44 PM
There's no research to my knowledge that supports the claim that gradual changes "MAY work for some but not many." Rather, there's been some research and reviews of the literature that indicate the opposite - that ultimate success is actually higher (statistically) for those who start with gradual changes.

I think that often end results are confused with the journey. Small changes can be a way to very big changes. "Moderation," changes meaning as you progress. A person isn't going to lose 100 lbs by eating one less apple a day - however that's not at all what gradual changes are about - because once the person is accustomed to the first change - they ADD another.

A concert violinist is a "radically" different violin player than a person who picks up a violin for the first time.

I may end up a vegan and a competitive athlete eventually (I'm not guaranteeing or betting on that), but I know that when I decide that I am happy with my weight and level of fitness, I will be a radically different person than I am now.

Even in med school, they don't hand new students a scalpel and send them into the operating room with a live patient.

And yet with dieting, that's often EXACTLY what we expect of people - perfection from the start. I don't know how many times I've heard some version of advice to people that if they "fall off the wagon" early it's a "sign" that they're not dedicated enough to losing weight.

The theory that gradual moderate changes are not as effective as radical ones is not supported by the research. Research and reviews of the literature on the subject that I have read showed either that there was little difference or that gradual changes actually had the advantage in the long term (although if you have information on research evidence to the contrary, research that shows radical changes outsuceeded gradual ones in the long-term, I'd love to read them).

So if there's really research support for breaking changes down into smaller, easier pieces, why isn't it very popular? I really think it has to do with the bias that fat people are inherently "lazy." Of course, lazy people want to take the lazy way out, so most of those lazy people are going to fail unless they stop being so darned lazy.

All I can say for myself is the radical, immediate change (except those that entailed amphetemine drugs) were not nearly as effective as breaking the process into more manageable changes that were easy to add to my existing life - rather than creating a whole new life and trying to mold myself into it.

butterflyinprogress
08-12-2009, 06:06 PM
The Diet Denominator, which is based on the volumetrics theory.

kiramira
08-12-2009, 09:35 PM
Every one of us has limiting beliefs in our minds that hold us back, some of which we aren't even aware of. These beliefs are so germane to who we are that we rarely even formulate them in conscious thoughts. They fester in our deepest unconscious, invisible to the naked eye but powerful enough to run our lives. They are the thoughts that sabotage us right at the moments of greatest opportunity.

How or why we developed these psychic patterns isn't really important. It's recognizing and releasing them that matters.

So much of life is about our beliefs (i.e. blocks) about what we can and cannot do, and our subconscious mind brilliantly obliges by manifesting circumstances and conditions that reflect our core beliefs. But when you test and breathe through those boundaries, the blocks start to move and eventually dissolve.

- Baron Baptiste
Journey Into Power, 2002, p 30

Whatever path you choose is completely up to you. I choose transformation and we'll see where each of us this time next year...

Peace

Kira

nelie
08-12-2009, 10:13 PM
Where you are next year isn't much as where you are 5, 10 or more years from now.

mandalinn82
08-12-2009, 10:17 PM
It's really interesting that you posted that quote, Kira.

We DO all have self-imposed limits and habits, and we DO all need to let some of them go in order to lose weight.

But the speed with which we let them go, or how many we let go at once, isn't addressed in the quote above. And while for certain personalities it definitely IS better to make all sorts of changes at once and let go of all limits simultaneously, for ME, and for others here, just as much success (and often, more) can be found by letting go of those limits one at a time. It has worked for many, and continues to work for many.

kiramira
08-12-2009, 10:19 PM
Actually Ms Nelie, time DOES play a role -- based on your age, weight loss is associated with increased mortality as one ages, believe it or not. I don't have the luxury of being 25 years old! I NEED and I emphasize the word NEED to get this weight off in a timely fashion. I don't have 10 years in which to experiment with moderation -- I choose to get healthy in a timely fashion because I NEED to get healthy. And time's a tickin'!

And to do this, I have to really examine WHO I am, WHO I want to be, and redefining myself so that I DON"T have to suffer with the threat of heart disease, diabetes, and cancer as a result of continued obesity.

But to each his/her own...one can choose moderation and perhaps get there, or one can really break through their own self-limits and biases and break through to a new life...and I'm not sure WHY there is such resistance to this concept! It seems acceptable to recommend that "slow and sure" and 10 years of moderation is just fine, but God FORBID you recommend that someone really goes through the hard work to fundamentally change their diet, exercise and most importantly, thought patterns and behaviours to get healthy! Which is bizarre, given the kudos given to those who chose to do this...

Ah well, to each his/her own, I suppose...

Kira

nelie
08-12-2009, 10:26 PM
We all want to work on whatever issues we have, whether they are weight loss or fitness related. Of course time and time again, those that look for the 'quick' fix are often the ones losing and regaining while those that are working on permanent habits are the ones that keep the habits.

I've lost 150 lbs and I'm in my 6th year of losing/maintaining. I think for me, the path I have chosen is the best one. I had many years prior to losing where I lost and regained the same 30 lbs over and over. It wasn't until working on the actual changes and making small steps that turned into bigger ones that it actually worked.

And getting healthy isn't purely about weight, it is about how we eat and what activity is in our lives. Also, I think studies have shown that losing as much as 10% of your body weight can show a big improvement in health.

For me, the goal isn't a number on the scale but what changes have taken place to get there and maintaining those changes.

mandalinn82
08-12-2009, 10:27 PM
Kira - no one is resisting that some people can succeed when making lots of changes at once. On the contrary - lots of folks here have done so! But lots of folks have ALSO made smaller, more incremental changes, and had just as much success.

The resistance is to the idea that big transformations all at once are the ONLY path that will lead to weight loss and maintenance, which disregards the experiences of many, many posters on this board.

kiramira
08-12-2009, 10:29 PM
I never said it was the only way! I said that it was as valid a path as the one recommended earlier of gradual gradual change...but can you honestly say that your definition of yourself and how you view food and exercise HASN'T radically changed??? If it hasn't, I fear maintenance will be a struggle. If it has, then why not recognize that this needs to happen right from the get go?

What I'm sensing is exactly what I put in my earlier quote...people look to their self-definitions and create scenarios that confirm their deeply-held beliefs. If you believe that you are only capable of tiny baby steps, that's exactly what you'll do. And you'll achieve tiny baby steps. And justify why this was done. All I'm suggesting is that perhaps, if one challenges these deep-rooted definitions, one can break through to become more than they ever thought possible. Perhaps one DOESN'T need baby steps. Maybe one can ACTUALLY break through these boundaries...

But, ya, you're probably right. After all, those who argue for their limitations generally get to keep them...


Kira

ajowens
08-12-2009, 10:32 PM
What have you tried??

mandalinn82
08-12-2009, 10:35 PM
Oh no, it definitely has! Absolutely! But not all at once, at all.

First I was a person who didn't drink sugared soda.
Then I was a person who didn't drink sugared soda, and avoided fast food.
Then I was a person who ate at home most days and counted calories.

Fast forward to NOW, when I'm a local-foodist who cans her own food, makes her own cheese, and pretty much only eats fruit from the farmers market. But that's stuff I'm STILL adding and refining. I did not go from where I was to where I am all at once, by any means, and I STILL believe in moderation in all things. I eat cupcakes, sometimes, and I don't consider it to be "off plan". I eat heavier meals some days. It's all moderate.

I am sure you didn't mean to imply that big changes all at once were the only way. But your posts did imply that, to me.

There are stories here of people who have lost huge amounts of weight BECAUSE they made the drastic changes NECESSARY. It was hard, it was uncomfortable, it was challenging, but when you hit a brick wall you can either STOP and stay comfortable, or you can MOVE RIGHT ON THROUGH IT and get results. Those who believe in moderation and gradual changes tend see the brick wall IMHO, and then ponder it and try to gradually either scale it or move around it which in my experience just means wasted time and effort with little or no results.


to be successful, you need a plan that works within your lifestyle, that you can work and sustaine effectively, and you need to fundamentally shift a number of things in your life. The advice to make a small change, observe, tweak and so on MAY work for some but not many. And I acknowledge that this isn't a race -- I never said it was! But 100% dedication and consistency to your plan is necessary. And it doesn't mean that you won't grow and adjust your plan accordingly. HOWEVER, in order to be effective, there HAS to be some sort of radical change in thought process or else you will stay mired in moderation.

Because to start small and make changes gradually is IMHO often an excuse NOT to change -- to make things easy and comfortable, to stay in a comfort zone that just isn't, well, healthy or productive, and to SAY that they have chosen to deal with a weight issue without REALLY dealing with it.

kiramira
08-12-2009, 10:40 PM
Ya, well, you're probably right...

Kira

mandalinn82
08-12-2009, 10:40 PM
OP, you've gotten a lot of great answers, but we're veering off topic. I'm going to go ahead and close this thread now.