30-Somethings - Anyone in the 30's section tried the Eat Clean Diet?




Wifey
08-10-2009, 01:10 PM
I was reading a few articles online about Tosca Reno's book "The Eat Clean Diet."

Just wondering if anyone here has had any experience with it? Or any opinions?

I'm trying to stick to the Canada Food Guide, which is what my dietician suggested...but it's not working so well...as you can tell by my ticker...:o

Any thoughts? :^:


Rebound
08-10-2009, 01:33 PM
I haven't :) What's the main concept? I have trouble with any diet that restricts a food group. That's why calorie counting and WW are the only things that I'm willing to commit to for the rest of my life -- but I'm always looking for new ideas that I can use WITH my current plans...

Wifey
08-10-2009, 01:53 PM
I just grabbed this quick description online:

"Eating clean basically means that foods are selected from those in their natural state; unprocessed and whole. For example tomatoes are a clean food whereas ketchup is not. Homemade tomato sauce may be considered a clean food if it is prepared from scratch with all ‘clean’ ingredients.

This is not necessarily a low calorie approach to dieting with a greater emphasis being placed on the quality of the foods selected, although Tosca does provide some suggestions to help with calorie control.

Reno stresses the importance of eating a healthy breakfast every day and never skipping meals. She also encourages dieters to prepare for meals that must be eaten away from home by packing nutritious foods that travel well and by planning in advance.

She recommends six small meals every day that are to be composed entirely of clean foods. Each meal should contain around 300-400 calories and must contain protein as well as complex carbohydrates.

Cheat meals are allowed only once a week. This means that this is a very strict plan that will require a great deal of discipline in addition to implementing a dramatic overhaul of diet and lifestyle for most people.

Recommended Foods

A wide range of fresh fruits and vegetables form the foundation of the diet.
Complex carbohydrates include legumes as well as whole grains such as brown rice and oats.
Lean proteins such as chicken breast, turkey and fish.
Sources of healthy fats include olive oil, avocado and raw nuts.

Foods to avoid include all processed foods, refined grains, sugar, foods containing saturated and trans fats and alcohol."

I think I may go pick up her book. I really do like the idea of eating raw veggies and sorta cleansing my body of all the processed crap we tend to ingest...it just sorta peaked my interest a bit...hmmmm...


mortonpixie
08-10-2009, 02:38 PM
Personally, I think this sounds like the same thing that every healthy eating program advocates, re-hashed and put in a different colored box. If you are calorie counting or doing WW, you will get to eat more if you eat as this program outlines. Processed and refined foods will always be higher in calories / points and lower in nutrition.

I say save your money on the book and just start looking into cutting out the processed and refined foods from your diet.

Lillyblossoms
08-10-2009, 06:09 PM
I think that might be a good book, I haven't read it personally. But that is the same premise as the diet that I have been using for a while now. My program was body makeovers, and their program works the same way. I eat 6-7 small meals a day, and it is a small amount of Turkey Fish or Chicken, with a veggie, and or a fruit / carb, like an apple or half of a yam. It really works for me, and you are right, it makes you feel like you are detoxing, because all the processed foods are removed from your diet.
I don't know what the book will tell you about portion size, but one thing I found out, is even though the portions are small, in the begining it really feels like a lot of food. But that got better in a few weeks. And the only thing that gets really restrictive is when you are going out for the weekend, or a party. Sometimes I get bored of the salads with some grilled, no salt, chicken or fish, but I am at the point where if I eat something that is too bad for me I get kind of sick. And of course I am used to a few drinks when out. So, sometimes I'm good, and sometimes I not. And to be honest, sometimes I don't order the salad... But I had been stuck in the 190s for a while, but once all the processed foods got out, it balanced my blood sugar. I really felt a healthy detox effect, which really helps the weight to keep coming off, and depending on how "good" I am during the week, I will lose 1 to 3 pounds a week. But if you are thinking about getting healthier, I would say do it. Because I feel so much better since cleaning up my diet. My program was a little expensive ($500). They customized it for me and kept in contact with me. Because my house is littered with books either fully read or not at all, so I needed them to help keep me honest. But those are the words they liked to use too, "eating clean" so, I would try it!!!

p.s. This was my first post, I hope it wasn't too long :)

Harps
08-11-2009, 04:32 PM
Personally, I think this sounds like the same thing that every healthy eating program advocates, re-hashed and put in a different colored box. If you are calorie counting or doing WW, you will get to eat more if you eat as this program outlines. Processed and refined foods will always be higher in calories / points and lower in nutrition.

I say save your money on the book and just start looking into cutting out the processed and refined foods from your diet.

Thats what I was thinking. When it all comes down to it, healthy eating as a lifestyle is always going to be pretty similar to what was just outlined. I take my eating cues from Michael Thurmond - 6 week body makeover (and my god does it work when you are really on plan!!) and it almost EXACTLY the same.

I think nutrition is nutrition, its all the same, and its a science. It has a formula. It just all depends on whether or not we want to stick to formula and most of us (including me!!!) don't always want to!