Weight Loss News and Current Events - Time Article - Why Exercise Won't Make You Thin




Glory87
08-08-2009, 01:27 AM
http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1914857-1,00.html

Thought it was interesting. I have always believed that my weight loss was nearly 95%+ diet related.

I am not sure I believe that exercise can prohibit weight loss efforts by causing excessive hunger, though.


kiramira
08-09-2009, 05:49 PM
Not sure about the extra hunger factor. I just know that I have to exercise a HECK of a long time to work off 2 Oreo cookies. I have always felt that to lose weight, it is about the diet. For cardiovascular health, it is all about the exercise. For weight maintenance, it is about the TWO to get to that nirvana state of optimal health...

Kira

TamiL
08-09-2009, 09:39 PM
All of my weight loss is diet related since I don't exercise other than just normal daily activities. I believe there is alot of truth to this story.


DivineFidelity
08-10-2009, 12:46 AM
I actually hadn't exercised at all for the first three weeks of my diet, and I lost almost 15 lbs. This week I've exercised for an hour 4 days in a row, and I haven't lost a single pound. It definitely makes me think..lol

Skinnycow
08-10-2009, 01:41 AM
I've lost 40 lbs in a little more than 4 months without exercising. (I did walk for 30 min on the treadmill once in June)

Idealmuse
08-10-2009, 02:07 AM
Sigh. This article annoys me because I feel it gives the OK stamp on not exercising.

Yes it's diet mostly, but you can lose a lot more weight with exercise. I'd lose about 1 per week if I didn't work out at this point in my journey and I'd have to lower my calories. I rather work out eat slightly more and feel that my lifestyle was more reasonably sustainable.

Exercise makes me LESS hungry (with the exception of swimming) not more and boosts my mood (so I'm less enclined to emotionally eat). I'm leaner, more compact and wear a smaller size then I would if I didn't exercise. It's not all about the number.

Yes, people need to learn how to balance the deficit. No you can't eat an extra muffin because you worked out. The general public doesn't understand that.

mandalinn82
08-10-2009, 02:15 AM
I definitely feel like weight loss is 85% diet, at least.

BUT...exercise has lots of other health benefits, and a lot of those benefits have helped me lose weight.

For example, when I exercise, I tend to make better food choices as the day goes on. That helps me stick to my plan. Exercise also helps me respect and honor my body, which makes me want to give it better fuel. It helps me sleep, too, and lack of sleep is also associated with trouble losing weight. It helps me moderate depression and anxiety I've dealt with since my teen years, which also makes it easier to focus myself on healthy behaviors.

The extra calories burned is just gravy, for me (and, of course, as a calorie counter, I'm very aware of my calories in, and don't let exercise effect my intake anyway. I haven't noticed extra hunger, but if I have some, it doesn't make me eat more in any case).

What frustrates me is that they said "Exercise won't make you thin", rather than the more accurate "Exercise ALONE won't make you thin". I still believe it's an important part of weight loss and a more important part of maintenance for most people, but you can't rely on it by itself to cause weight loss.

stellarosa27
08-10-2009, 01:18 PM
Weight loss for me has always been diet related. I've been active all my life - and overweight all my life. I liked the article because it seems that the general public believes "Exercise = Weight Loss" which is really not true. That's why our society tends to think "fat = lazy" and that is NOT ACCURATE. The majority of my girl friends are normal weight, and I exercise/am more active than every one of them. They just know how to eat properly.

As for the increased hunger issue - it honestly depends on how much I exercise. I try to time exercise right before I eat (breakfast or dinner) so I'm eating already. I'm on WW so I can see, okay, just earned this many Activity Points so I can eat this many points + activity points if I want, but lots of times I don't need the APs - its just all about eating the right foods, etc. I read once that in most cases, your body doesn't need "extra" food after exercise - its just that exercise is a stress, so your body's natural response to stress is to want food, hence the extra hunger pangs. But once your body gets used to the exercise, it doesn't feel "stressed" any more, so no more hunger pangs.

I agree that for HEALTHY weight loss and maintenance you should use a combination of diet and exercise, but there are many cases where it has been done without exercise.

doIlookfat?
08-10-2009, 09:23 PM
For me, I've noticed that when I am on summer break (I'm a kindergarten teacher) I tend to not be as hungry throughout the day, but when I get back to school and get REAL BUSY, I am starving my 10am! I strongly believe the more active you are, the more you burn and the more your body wants to refuel itself.

I'm a person who would rather lose weight naturally by using the stairs instead of elevator, park away from the store instead of close, and basically not do things the "lazy", convenient way. I hate gyms and forced exercise. I know a lot of people who are slim and never purposely work out. They do it by having active lifestyles. I tend to watch them for encouragement and support. But that's just me.

Windchime
08-10-2009, 11:23 PM
The article seemed to be saying this: "If you exercise and then reward yourself with a huge Starbuck's muffin and a quart of Gatorade, you won't lose weight." My answer to this is: Well, DUH! If people are really doing this--eating above and beyond what they have burned in exercising, then of course they won't lose weight. It's basic math, and it's kind of suprising to me that anyone would be suprised by this as the author seems to be.

I know that, for me, some kind of exercise has usually been necessary for me to lose at anything other than a glacial pace. Not only does it help me lose weight, but as Mandalinn states, it helps me to sleep, reduce stress and anxiety, and feel less depressed in general.

So, no thanks--I like sitting on the couch and knitting, but I'll save that for winter. And I would write more, but I gotta go--it's time for my 3.5 mile brisk walk.

ennay
08-11-2009, 03:56 PM
I kind of "resent" the articles implication that exercise=hunger=blueberrymuffin

That old adage that if you "just didnt eat junk food" you wouldnt be fat again.

I dont eat more after working out because I "think I deserve fatty foods" I am HUNGRY. And I can supress that, it takes about 3 weeks of torture and my workouts go to heck. And when I am training...ugh. I could skip the carbs in the dinner but then good luck with speedwork the next day.

But then I got fat on having an extra helping of roasted veggies and an extra bit of oatmeal etc. etc. I've never been a junk food junkie. I was fat in 6th grade and had junk food maybe 1-2 times a year growing up. I just plain have an enormous appetite. I remember being really shocked once when I added up the calories in my healthy all natural clean eating breakfast. It was just plain too MUCH.

Exercise is vital to my mental state, but it doesnt do much for my weight loss.

caryesings
08-11-2009, 04:27 PM
Sigh. This article annoys me because I feel it gives the OK stamp on not exercising.

Yes it's diet mostly, but you can lose a lot more weight with exercise. I'd lose about 1 per week if I didn't work out at this point in my journey and I'd have to lower my calories. I rather work out eat slightly more and feel that my lifestyle was more reasonably sustainable.

Exercise makes me LESS hungry (with the exception of swimming) not more and boosts my mood (so I'm less enclined to emotionally eat). I'm leaner, more compact and wear a smaller size then I would if I didn't exercise. It's not all about the number.

Yes, people need to learn how to balance the deficit. No you can't eat an extra muffin because you worked out. The general public doesn't understand that.


My body works like yours. I use that less hungry period after exercise to do my grocery shopping so not tempted to buy things I shouldn't. Except for the day I made the mistake of grocery shopping after swimming laps for 65 minutes! The sort of good news is the bad choices never made it to my kitchen. The bad news is because I ate them in the car...

But my real life calorie needs are so low (I'm a programmer working from my home, I don't even get activity of getting ready for work) that to cut them for a decent calorie deficit without exercise I'd be starving and wouldn't last.

Idealmuse
08-12-2009, 09:47 PM
My body works like yours. I use that less hungry period after exercise to do my grocery shopping so not tempted to buy things I shouldn't. Except for the day I made the mistake of grocery shopping after swimming laps for 65 minutes! The sort of good news is the bad choices never made it to my kitchen. The bad news is because I ate them in the car...

But my real life calorie needs are so low (I'm a programmer working from my home, I don't even get activity of getting ready for work) that to cut them for a decent calorie deficit without exercise I'd be starving and wouldn't last.

Yeah, same here I work from home (artist). My bodybugg says I get something like 1700 for a non-activity day. If I get 1700 at just over 200lbs how much would I get at 150? And how could I possibly cut back much on food at that point? I'd be STARVING. As it is now I shoot for 1500 but I'm not strict about it and I have the leeway for extra calories if I need them. I burn 2500-3000 most days because of my training/exercise. That creates a MUCH better deficit. :)

Misora
08-13-2009, 08:04 PM
Excercise is to dieting as emergency fund is to budgeting. I'm having to learn this one myself. When I started out I watched calories and worked out but I was always over my calories for the days I worked out alot or spent the whole day starving (it doesn't help that my work out days started 4 hours earlier than my non working out days). Since then I almost entirely stopped working out and while I'm staying on track better with dieting my weight loss has really slowed?

Why? Because calories you should eat is based on activity. I'm a pretty analitical person so my weight loss plan is to eat no less than my BMR and no more than the number of calories that the Harris Benedict Formula says you will maintain on. At sedentary (even with a little excercise) the multiplier is 1.2. A .2 difference!! In my case that's a difference of 380 calories between maximum healthy loss and gain. That's a couple of tablespoons of regular dressing instead of light! Lightly excercise 3 times a week and it goes up to .375 or 780 calories a day. Moderate excecise pushes it over 1000. So yes I'm hungier when I excercise but if I'm rarely 1000 calories a day hungrier.

Without excercising it's like scraping by budgetwise paycheck to paycheck. One flat tire or blown gasket can put you behind your budget for a month. With excercise it's like having a part time job. Yes you lose a little free time and maybe your new job has it's own expenses (work uniforms, extra gas or just eating out more often) but it gives you a cushion when times are tough.

Misora
08-13-2009, 08:10 PM
Oh yeah and the biggest advantage for me working out is that I tend to do it during times I might otherwise be tempted to snack. :P My bike trail mostly snack free and the mexican restaurant at the end of it has some healthy options if I skip the chips.

Beck
08-13-2009, 08:18 PM
Interesting. I always lose more when I'm exercising, maybe not because of the exercise, but because I realize how much I need to work to burn off a certain amount of calories compared to how little time and effort it takes to eat them. When I don't exercise I tend to overeat, when I exercise I eat healthier.

TheRose76
08-13-2009, 08:37 PM
Its like a car that looks good with a lousy motor, Excercise is going to help that heart and let you enjoy activities and longevity than anything else. What good is looking good if you can't enjoy the activities you are longing to enjoy.

sumu1
08-23-2009, 07:29 PM
Well, at the moment I'm not doing a heck of alot of "formal" exercise. I work in retail, so at work I'm pretty active 40 -50 hours a week. I mow my lawn (a hand mower not a power mower) twice a week. I get out and walk when I can plus my housework. Granted I'm probably not going to get 6 pack abs by any means:-) but I've lost almost 9 lbs in the last 3 weeks just by primarily eating better. I still believe exercise is important but I can see that diet is 70-80% of the battle.

blueberry3
08-25-2009, 04:12 PM
Fitness magazine wrote a response to this article called "10 Reasons Why Exercise Makes You Thin (Or Why TIME Magazine Got It Wrong)" -- which brings up some interesting points.

http://features.fitnessmagazine.com/10ReasonsWhyExerciseMakesYouThin.html

What do you guys think of that response?

maryshady
09-02-2009, 09:17 AM
I didn't read all the posts so I don't know if I am repeating what someone else said but yes i agree that weight loss is 80% diet and 20% exercise. That being said you can lose weight without exercising but you will lose fat and lean muscle. Exercise helps you retain muscle while losing weight.

In my own experience I once did a program Body for Life that included 3 days of 20 min aerobic exercise and 3 days of 45 min weight lifting. I lost about 11 lbs. in 12 weeks but tons of inches. My body definition changed dramatically even though I had only lost 11 lbs. I lost 2 dress sizes too.

HTH

cheerios
09-02-2009, 10:29 AM
very interesting

Ivy1534
09-02-2009, 03:39 PM
okay, I am new here, so if I am out of line, please let me know.

I am one of those people that others kept saying, "if you would just exercise more, you would not be fat." or "just go on a walk." For me, though, it is not that easy.

Let me explain: I had a lot of heath problems as a child and because of those health problems, I have heart issues. These heart issues cause me not to be able to do ANY exercise for more than, say a walk to the mailbox without getting winded or my heart flying out of my chest.

So for me, the weight loss HAS to be 100% diet. Which sucks, because, as someone put it, what is the point of being thin if you cannot enjoy the things you want to do (or something like that).

I agree with the article in saying that it is mostly diet, HOWEVER, this could be because muscle weighs more than fat. You could be loosing fat but gaining muscle. This muscle then takes more calories to keep up (in relation to fat) so, you get hungry. Just a thought?

Try eating a lot of protein before working out and it should help with that hunger. Or so I am told, I don't know from personal experience (obviously).

kaplods
09-10-2009, 11:36 AM
I think the article was intentionally sensational (because that's what "sells" articles these days). It primarily focused on common misconceptions regarding exercise, such as that weight loss can be achieved by exercise alone. If it's possible, very few people have achieved it, because increasing exercise also often means increased hunger, and if a person isn't aware of that they can become sumo-wrester style fat-but-(maybe relatively)fit.

I've seen it more in overweight men than overweight women, but the attitude that "I'll just work it off," is fairly common. Often, though, the calorie level the person plans on working off would require they climb a mountain or two every day.

Shannon in ATL
09-10-2009, 11:51 AM
I noticed this weekend that CNN had picked up the Time article and had it as a main story on their homepage.

Diva
09-10-2009, 12:50 PM
Fitness magazine wrote a response to this article called "10 Reasons Why Exercise Makes You Thin (Or Why TIME Magazine Got It Wrong)" -- which brings up some interesting points.

http://features.fitnessmagazine.com/10ReasonsWhyExerciseMakesYouThin.html

What do you guys think of that response?

I think Time Mag was irresponsible with that article and agree with Mandalinn. Her title is much more suitable.

I really like Fitness magazines rebuttal.

All I know is exercise makes me feel better. I am less apt to emotionally eat and I don't want to X out the hour of exercise I did on any given day for one little cup-cake or muffin. Exercise makes me feel better mentally, thus handling stress better and it helps me make better, healthier decisions. I don't always "feel" like it, but once I drag my butt to the GYM or do something here at home, I always feel happy that I did do it. :)