100 lb. Club - Is it ever ok to emotionally eat?




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toastedsmoke
08-04-2009, 08:49 PM
Ok so I'm doing calorie counting and it's been a rough day. I'm trying not to eat when I don't feel hungry and trying to eat things that are useful to my body. Is it ever ok to emotionally eat if you watch the calories of what you're eating?

Context:
Right now I'm at 1200 calories and normally I wouldn't eat anymore today because I already sort of had dinner an hour ago (I try to stay between 1200 and 1500 calories per day). I just had a conversation with my mom in which she was kind of depressed and I encouraged her and now I'm depressed and all I want to eat is mashed boiled eggs and cheese because that's my comfort food/happy place. I KNOW I'm not hungry but I just feel I need food comfort.

On the one hand, i know it will only be about 100 calories of consumption and still within my daily limit for myself, on the other hand I feel like i should be trying to wean myself away from using food as a comfort (the biggest reason for my weight issues). What do you think?


seagirl
08-04-2009, 08:58 PM
I would write in my journal for at least 1 page. Then sit and take 10 slow deep breaths. Then lie down and take 10 more breaths. Then if I was still hungry I'd eat. :hug:

Jokan
08-04-2009, 08:58 PM
Hmm, u have two very valid points. If u are trying to work on the emotional eating I would refrain from it and do something instead to lift your spirits. Watch a silly movie, call a friend or whatever tickles u. U will feel so much better in the end!!!:)


kiramira
08-04-2009, 09:04 PM
Isn't this more about WHY you are eating rather than WHAT you are eating? I mean, it's a small step from egg and cheese to chips and dip to ice cream and cake when the egg and cheese isn't available.

The thing is -- IMHO if you want to be at a normal weight you have to live like a "normal weight" person...you have to BEHAVE like one and THINK like one, and when you get there, the thought process will BE there...

So ask yourself -- do "normal weight" people turn to food for comfort? None that I know of! So I think that maybe your reason for eating rather than WHAT you are eating might be more important to think about, right now...

Now, I'm NOT saying that one NEVER eats emotionally. I mean, life HAPPENS to all of us. But it sounds like you may want to give yourself PERMISSION to do so, and that's a bit, well, scary to me...

JMHO

Kira

toastedsmoke
08-04-2009, 09:33 PM
You're right. It's not really about the food, its about breaking the eating my feelings cycle. I know I shouldn't give myself and excuse to do something that isn't beneficial to me. I need to find new ways to deal.

I just watched an episode of 30 Rock, which made me laugh and thus feel a little better. I'll do a yoga dvd now and then curl up in bed with a suitably trashy romance novel (where everything turns out right in the end) till I fall asleep.

Thanks guys.

kiramira
08-04-2009, 09:35 PM
AWESOME!!!

Great choice...and I love 30 Rock too! Especially the episode with Steve Martin, and he begs Liz Lemon to go with him to TORONTO because it is JUST like New York but without all the STUFF!!!

:rofl:

Have a great yoga practice, and tell us tomorrow how you did...

:hug:

Kira

nineoceansaway
08-04-2009, 10:21 PM
I'd say no. If hunger isn't the problem, food isn't the answer. Sit with those feelings, allow yourself to feel without numbing yourself. It's tough but it will get easier and easier :grouphug:

txestella
08-05-2009, 12:30 AM
Great thread to open when I was just doing that internal negotiation on if I should break my daily limit by 120 calories. It would be the result of events of the past 2 days....and I was in the midst of justifying it, but this thread just set me straight!

Rosinante
08-05-2009, 02:51 AM
Great question, especially as 1200 is quite low and, health speaking, you'd plenty 'space' left to eat more.

I admire the route you took! Definitely the right answer: I think emotional eating is always to be avoided because it is so much the slippery slope, something healthy today, something less healthy tomorrow, beyond the calorie budget the next day. I know, I've done it so often. You are to be congratulated!

Bonnie+J
08-05-2009, 05:42 AM
well done on not giving into it!!! you have done so well sticking to your daily allowance, and for resisting the temptation. there are other things to make us feel good too, just sometimes we forget what and if we dont stop ourselves we go to the old reliable. but you made a healthy choice!!! well done!!!

kiramira, i love your outlook on it too. it was just the kind of talking too i needed even tho it wasnt directed at me! i need to start thinking like a skinny person! so thanks for that!

Madison
08-05-2009, 05:50 AM
Well done for not giving in! making the decision to start eating to soothe you does not end well (in my experience) . . . particularly if its ever been a problem in the past. Very hard to put the breaks on once you head in that direction. I think its very different as Kira said if it kinda just happens (ie. through lack of planning etc) . . . there seems to be less negative energy associated with it than if you do it for the reasons and the manner outlined above.

Such a great move that you worked through it!!! :) You are awesome.

rockinrobin
08-05-2009, 06:37 AM
The thing is -- IMHO if you want to be at a normal weight you have to live like a "normal weight" person...you have to BEHAVE like one and THINK like one, and when you get there, the thought process will BE there...

So ask yourself -- do "normal weight" people turn to food for comfort? None that I know of!



Well here's one normal weight person who does eat emotionally, and DOES turn to food for comfort every now and then. And I'm not the only one that I know that does this. A GREAT many of my "always been slim friends" do this as well. It is one of the most difficult things to conquer. Not sure why food IS such a comfort to us, seeing that in the end it causes more problems then it solves....

After losing all the pounds that I have, there are still times (no where close to how it used to be) where I turn to food, sadly. Sometimes I just need/want to chew. If that is the case, it can really be anything - a few string beans, a few stalks of celery. I know 1000% this is something that STILL needs to be worked on - I am a work in progress.

I think the fact that you paused and came here to "talk" about it prior to doing it is fantastic. And then how you wound up handling it in the end - BRILLIANT and COMMENDABLE and without a doubt the "right" thing to do. You should be amazingly proud of yourself. You are firmly on your way down the right path. And the best thing about it - remember this. Remember how you got through just this one time - and now you KNOW that you CAN get through - and then if need be (& we know there will be a need be), you can repeat the process. Because you've proved to yourself that you can do it. You have just begun forming new and healthy habits. And before you know it, these will become your "normal". Yup, you are definitely on the right path. :cheer:

Devsmama
08-05-2009, 08:13 AM
Like most of the people here said, you have to deal with those feelings. It's a good thing that you came here and then watched a really funny show to help get past wanting to eat. There are going to be times when things get to be tough and you want to eat, but having another outlet aside from that is great. I had to learn this lesson recently. I won't go into the gory details, but suffice it to say that it was traumatic and I wanted to eat a gallon of ice cream. But the more I thought about what happened, the angrier I got, the more stress I felt, I hit the gym, HARD! Food is no longer my outlet, exercise is and that is something I'm proud of and you should be too for what you used as a substitute for you emotion.

One last thing, about those calories. I eat around 1500-1700 and I just lost 6lbs this week, you think that may be too low for you?

kasmin
08-05-2009, 08:16 AM
I totally have a quandary with this too. I agree in theory that it's best to try to break the cycle and think as a "skinny mini." However, I have also found that sometimes when I don't comfort eat in controlled healthy way, I end up binging later:( So right now I am allowing myself to comfort eat in a limited healthy way (e.g. some nuts instead of potato chips, or watermelon instead of chocolate). Of course, these are still empty calories for me, since I wasn't really eating for hunger in the first place:o ##sigh## Has anyone ever been able to break this habit altogether?

rockinrobin
08-05-2009, 08:38 AM
Of course, these are still empty calories for me, since I wasn't really eating for hunger in the first place:o ##sigh## Has anyone ever been able to break this habit altogether?

I can only speak for myself.

Like I said earlier, I have not completely broken this habit. But it's no where even close to how it used to be in the past. There ARE times when I will give in and grab something - but it doesn't necessarily break my calorie budget. I'm good just munching on some veggies.

I HAVE found other things to ease stress. And wouldn't you know it, now one of the things that keeps me sane during times of stress is STAYING on plan. When everything is all out of sorts, having control over SOMETHING is a huge comfort to me. That this is the case still boggles my mind. There are many things we can't control, but our food intake IS one of them. Nothing pleases me more (& yes comforts me) then staying on plan.

When ever I get the urge to eat over stress, or even just "to eat" and I find something else to do instead, I have never, not one time regretted NOT eating. Never.

Bad habits ARE hard to break. But once good habits have been established - they're hard to break too!

Develop some strategies for yourself to cope with the inevitable times of stress. Know them in advance and fall back on them when need be. Before you know it, this is what you'll be turning to instead of food........ usually that is. ;)

Lori Bell
08-05-2009, 09:15 AM
As long as there have been humans, we have eaten for emotional reasons. We call it celebrating, or mourning etc. but it's really just a happy or sad emotion. I remember when I was just a little tot, tagging along with Grandma to take loads of food to the neighbors who had just lost their Father. I remember Grandma saying that being sad makes you hungry. Birthday cakes and dinners are served for the happy emotion.

Every "naturally skinny" person I know eats a slice of Birthday cake or partakes in the snacks at a baby shower or hit the dessert table after a funeral. The big difference between "them" and "us" is they stop eating and move on when the emotions calm, where we agonize over it, analyze it, and repeat the patten....to keep the emotions coming, to keep the food coming.

I personally think EVERYBODY does a little emotional eating, but just like any other addictive substance, some people know when to say when, and some people don't. If you are one that can't stop with one, then you are better off with none.

rockinrobin
08-05-2009, 09:39 AM
As long as there have been humans, we have eaten for emotional reasons. We call it celebrating, or mourning etc. but it's really just a happy or sad emotion. I remember when I was just a little tot, tagging along with Grandma to take loads of food to the neighbors who had just lost their Father. I remember Grandma saying that being sad makes you hungry. Birthday cakes and dinners are served for the happy emotion.

Every "naturally skinny" person I know eats a slice of Birthday cake or partakes in the snacks at a baby shower or hit the dessert table after a funeral. The big difference between "them" and "us" is they stop eating and move on when the emotions calm, where we agonize over it, analyze it, and repeat the patten....to keep the emotions coming, to keep the food coming.

I personally think EVERYBODY does a little emotional eating, but just like any other addictive substance, some people know when to say when, and some people don't. If you are one that can't stop with one, then you are better off with none.

Yes. I agree. Thing is -there's emotional eating and then there's emotional overeating. Which is a problem many of us here suffer from. OVEReating, which is a form of self-abuse, is where the problem lies and why it is so vital to develop some coping skills.

scarletmeshell
08-05-2009, 10:11 AM
Congrats on staying strong. Good for you!

thinpossible
08-05-2009, 10:35 AM
I personally think EVERYBODY does a little emotional eating, but just like any other addictive substance, some people know when to say when, and some people don't. I heartily agree. Everyone does it. I think the difference is that fat people think the food will make them feel better where as normal eaters (presumably normal weight people) don't eat as much because they don't have such high expectations of food. They know a hershey's kiss will make them feel better for 2 minutes, whereas the overweight person keeps thinking it will be a bigger fix, so they eat more to try to attain that.

That's my theory anyway.

I think emotional eating, if you're overweight and have an unhealthy dependence on food, can end up making you feel worse very easily because you have guilt that accompanies it. If you can avoid it you should, but an occasional indulgence isn't going to hurt you.

sharongracepjs
08-05-2009, 10:52 AM
If hunger isn't the problem, food isn't the answer.


SO TRUE. Thanks for such plain talk.

I agree with y'all that it's "normal" to eat in response to emotion, and that "normal" weight people have learned to resist or limit that response.

When you turn food into substance abuse, though, emotional eating quickly becomes part of its own problem. Even though I think it's not a sin to eat for comfort, those of us who have abused this privilege, using food to hide from emotions and ended up trapped in our own self-disgust, we then are no longer "allowed" to feed emotions, until we relearn a healthy relationship with food and our own feelings.

Think about it like you would any other addict - is an alcoholic allowed to have just one drink after a bad day? No.

JulieJ08
08-05-2009, 10:58 AM
You know, I've noticed several commercials recently for diet foods. A woman takes a bite and apparently goes into pure rapture. No wonder we expect too much from food. We're constantly told to use food to get satisfaction in life, instead of, you know, getting it from life. I am sure I have seen thousands of such commercials without giving it any thought, but yesterday it just made me laugh out loud. The woman in the commercial looked so utterly ridiculous being in rapture over her bite of diet food. These are commercials that claim to be about health.

Trazey34
08-05-2009, 11:49 AM
I have to agree with Robin - a lot, I'd say all of the women for sure, who are normal sized people and always have been, DO eat emotionally. The difference is, they eat for 1 or 2 days when they break up with a boyfriend, and then give their heads a shake and move on. It's not like 'us' where we'd celebrate good days with food, bad days , bored days, mondays, holidays, etc. you get the point LOL. Like so many things with "us" compared to "them skinnies" is they do naughty things once in a blue moon, and awesome choices and exercise most of the time. I've just had it backwards :)

mandalinn82
08-05-2009, 12:08 PM
I also know a LOT of normal-sized people who eat emotionally. In fact, I'd venture to say that MOST people eat emotionally (as was said previously, a celebration BBQ is eating for the emotion of "happy". Most emotional events (weddings, funerals, holidays, birthdays) and traditions are focused around food, and most people do eat at those events)

I believe that, in our culture, it would be very hard to have a "food is fuel only" mindset, and completely detach it from emotion. Are you never going to have another fancy dinner to celebrate an anniversary (even if you cook it or order something and it's a healthy meal, it's still eating different/special food for non-hunger reasons...because it's "special" emotionally, which is still emotional eating)?

The important thing is to figure out what your limits and boundaries are for the emotional eating that, frankly, I think is sort of inevitable sometimes. If I was in your situation (calories low for the day, choosing a healthy food) I probably would have made the opposite decision as you, because those are my limits for emotional eating...within my calories and food choices I would eat normally. Other people might have different limits on what is OK with them. But if you put those limits in place and enforce them, you're not going to have the slippery slope to other, bigger overeating that the others mentioned, so long as you continue to enforce the limits.

kiramira
08-05-2009, 12:30 PM
I think we're confusing the issue about emotional eating, here.

YES, normal sized people eat in celebration of events. YES, normal sized poeple at solemn event. YES normal sized people have cake occasionally.

But the situation outlined by our OP was different -- she had a discussion with a loved one who was depressed and SHE felt depressed and was going to turn to food for comfort. This, IMHO, is emotional eating.

Not alot of "normal-sized" people that I know turn that often to food that is bad to comfort themselves. They deal with this differently. Most recognize the emotion, feel it, talk about it and move on. None that I know of say "well, I'm bored/lonely/sad, so I'm gonna eat something". This IS how many of us who have weight issues deal with emotion. Hence the term, emotional eating. And if you want to break your emotional eating cycle, it may be helpfuto recognize that if you THINK like a normal-sized person and DEAL with the emotion without eating, eventually the behaviour will feel natural.

So that was my POINT. Life happens. We ALL, regardless of size, make poor food choices occasionally. We ALL may have cake or ice cream in social celebratory or memorial events. But NOT all of us turn to food when we are sad, lonely, or depressed. THIS was, IMHO, the OP's question...

JMHO

Kira

mandalinn82
08-05-2009, 01:28 PM
Not alot of "normal-sized" people that I know turn that often to food that is bad to comfort themselves. They deal with this differently. Most recognize the emotion, feel it, talk about it and move on. None that I know of say "well, I'm bored/lonely/sad, so I'm gonna eat something".

I know many people of normal weight that do this. Good or bad, it's sort of a cultural norm at this point, that most people DO participate in, IMHO. I've known a LOT of normal weight folks who get upset and eat something. They just don't eat as MUCH of that something as I might.

rockinrobin
08-05-2009, 01:54 PM
Not alot of "normal-sized" people that I know turn that often to food that is bad to comfort themselves. They deal with this differently. Most recognize the emotion, feel it, talk about it and move on. None that I know of say "well, I'm bored/lonely/sad, so I'm gonna eat something". This IS how many of us who have weight issues deal with emotion. Hence the term, emotional eating. And if you want to break your emotional eating cycle, it may be helpfuto recognize that if you THINK like a normal-sized person and DEAL with the emotion without eating, eventually the behaviour will feel natural.


I'm in total agreement with Amanda. Doesn't matter WHICH emotion it happens to be - sad/lonely/frustrated/angry/depressed/hurt - doesn't matter what SIZE the person - food is thought of as a comfort - and people - of all sizes turn to it.

But of course, the difference is how MUCH they turn to it - how often and in what amounts.

Something just popped into my head - I remember my "normal weight" daughter, when she was all of 16, went through a break-up and what did my 14 year old daughter do? She went out and bought her a pint of chocolate Haagen Daz ice cream. She said something like, "I think this is mandatory......"

They learn at a very young age, don't they?

kiramira
08-05-2009, 03:08 PM
I guess I should get out there more! Perhaps what I've observed is the behaviours of those people who are normal weight and never had a weight issue. As opposed to people like me, who are approaching or at a normal weight who have struggled with weight for precisely this reason.

I just personally think that

1. emotional eating -- eating to alleviate hurt, stress, depression, anger -- is not OK. It happens, but to answer the OPs question, IMHO, it is not OK. And I won't be giving myself permission to emotionally eat in the way that I've described any time soon.

2. This is similar to rewarding ones self with food -- we had a great discussion on another thread about "if I lose weight, should I have chocolate cake"...IMHO, the answer is NO. This is another form of destructive behaviour which makes food the centre of the emotion experienced, as opposed to experiencing the emotion itself. And if it isn't OK to reward yourself with food, it is equally NOT OK to comfort yourself with food. IMHO.

3. I know that when I observe emotional eating in my teen niece, I generally try to talk to her about it. Not in a judgemental way, but in the way that "do you really think that piece of cake will HONESTLY make you feel better"? because if this habit is noticed early and addressed, it may bode well for my DN and the way she handles emotion and food in the future. No need to learn bad habits from my poor example!!!

4. I just want to be a "normal weight person". And to do that, I need to emulate the behaviours of those normal-weighted people around me. My DH is my primary example. If I can figure out how HE deals with food and I emulate those behaviours, I think I can adjust my "brain" to match my desired lifestyle and weight. And I have noticed that no matter how crappy the day, no matter how irritated he gets, no matter what happens, the way he deals with this is to talk about it and then does something he enjoys. I like this way of thinking -- better IMHO than giving myself permission to dive into a bag of Doritos, no? Perhaps the concept of making emotional eating OK (as opposed to something that may happen and we deal with it then) is a hang over from my personal baggage of behaviours that were less than productive for me.

Again, this is just me. We all have our own paths to follow. Mine hopefully will take me in the direction of removing food as a source of comfort/entertainment/reward and towards a healthier relationship with food in general...

And if you want to BE it, you gotta LIVE it, no?

:hug:

Kira

toastedsmoke
08-05-2009, 03:30 PM
Thanks to everyone for the advice and support. This is such an interesting conversation because I think I (and evidently others) battle with it everyday. Ok so yesterday I did do the yoga and got into bed early with my trashy romance novel.

However, I swear I heard the eggs in my fridge calling my name (like i know it sounds like crazy-talk but it was like they were promising me comfort and happiness) and so I thought that was pretty sick (bcos it is and it smacks of addiction and I don't want that to be me) so I got out of bed, got dressed and left my apartment to go work out in my buildings fitness room. When I got back, I had an orange (which while not on plan, was not the worst thing in the world- even though it tasted nothing like eggs and cheese), I felt a little full and I had the taste in my mouth so I was able to settle in bed without the obsession with the eggs.

Today, I had eggs and cheese for breakfast and I feel a lot better about not giving in yesterday because I'm my own harshest critic and it's really important for me to stay on plan because I give myself a hard time when I don't which makes my emotional eating urges worse. Like I've eaten cake and pizza since I restarted my journey, but they were on plan and I budgeted them into my daily calorie allowance, I didn't eat them because I felt bad. I think that's the biggest thing I personally need to break.

Some of you spoke of thin friends who eat like a pint of ice-cream when they're sad. Well I'm the type who'll eat the pint, feel sick to my stomach, eat a second pint and then have some pizza on top of that, maybe so that I feel so physically uncomfortable that the emotional issues are pushed to the back burners. And that's what I need to avoid getting back into. I know I was definitely on the low side calorie-wise and if it had been a matter of hunger or peckish-ness, then it would have been fine. I just sometimes need help, reminding myself that its a slippery slope.

You guys are all really helpful because it sounds like a stupid thing to post: "should i eat something or not" as if I'm a child. But sometimes someone just needs to support the inner voice that tells you to stop.

kiramira
08-05-2009, 03:34 PM
:hug:

Good for YOU for recognizing your behaviours and trying to change them. Sure isn't easy...I so know where you are. My new mantra, for what it is worth is: "Is this what a normal-weighted person would do?"
And I find that if I have the ask myself the question, deep down, I already know the answer...

Hang in there...I'm glad things worked out for you last night...

:hug:

Kira

Misora
08-05-2009, 03:36 PM
If hunger isn't the problem, food isn't the answer.

I have a new daily mantra at the top of my journal for today. It's been stressful at work but I need to save my afternoon snack for when I'm truly hungry not just mad. (Okay I put cure instead of answer but same thing)

david
08-05-2009, 03:42 PM
the beauty of this website is that were talking to people who understand...just as i cant understand an addiction to alcohol or smoking, there are people who thing were just lazy...thats why its so important to stay in touch on bad days as well as good days...sometimes , not always, we can talk each other off of the ledge...have a great day everyone

toastedsmoke
08-05-2009, 03:46 PM
the beauty of this website is that were talking to people who understand...just as i cant understand an addiction to alcohol or smoking, there are people who thing were just lazy...thats why its so important to stay in touch on bad days as well as good days...sometimes , not always, we can talk each other off of the ledge...have a great day everyone

Exactly!!!!!! :)

mandalinn82
08-05-2009, 04:44 PM
"What do normal-weight people do" is a great mantra if it works for you!

I guess i just haven't spend a lot of time thinking about what normal weight people do, because biochemically, I won't ever be one. Post weight-loss, you will always be able to distinguish me from someone who was never obese with a simple blood test...we are biochemically different in our hunger hormones like insulin and leptin (sad but true). I'm never going to be the same as a person who was never fat...I'll always be what researchers lovingly refer to as "weight reduced obese" or just "reduced obese". So i tend to worry more about what other maintainers do, and even beyond that, what I know works for ME, rather than what people who've never been obese do.

But YMMV. For me, some emotional eating is invariably going to be a part of my life, so I make a point to develop strategies to keep that eating in line with my calorie plan, and to keep it with healthy foods, and that has worked for me just as well as trying to prevent myself altogether from doing something that is common among both overweight and normal weight people.

kiramira
08-05-2009, 05:10 PM
While the jury is still out with respect to definitive "proof" of the above, I firmly believe that the MIND is the most powerful organ in the body. If you can conquer your mindset, your old ways of thinking, and if you challenge yourself to believe and act in new ways REGARDLESS of what you believe your limitations are, you'd be AMAZED at what you can achieve.

And whether or not there is proof of THAT is to me immaterial -- I think we all choose our realities in many senses, and I prefer to believe that I can LIVE the dream rather than feel "doomed" (so to speak) to a life of obesity.

If I wanna BE it, I gotta LIVE it, and if I wanna LIVE it, I gotta BELIEVE it, and if I wanna BELIEVE it, I gotta THINK it. It all starts (and ends) with the mind...if I truly think that biology is forever and unchangeably against me, then what's the point? I choose to believe otherwise.

Kira

mandalinn82
08-05-2009, 05:30 PM
If I wanna BE it, I gotta LIVE it, and if I wanna LIVE it, I gotta BELIEVE it, and if I wanna BELIEVE it, I gotta THINK it. It all starts (and ends) with the mind...if I truly think that biology is forever and unchangeably against me, then what's the point? I choose to believe otherwise.


Right on! I believe that too - no one said that weight loss was impossible! Just said that, biochemically, reduced-obese people maintain weight on fewer calories than never-obese people of the same weight. Doesn't mean it's impossible - just means that we'll never be just the same as people who were never obese.

But that's no reason or justification not to lose weight, because we CAN do that and we HAVE and ARE, right?

rockinrobin
08-05-2009, 05:43 PM
.if I truly think that biology is forever and unchangeably against me, then what's the point? I choose to believe otherwise.

Kira

Oh I believe it all right. I'm not and will never ever be like a person who's always been a "normal" weight. And therefore I can never, ever think like one. One off meal, one and I tack on numerous pounds. My body is waiting for me to get fat again - but it can wait all it wants. So though I may not be able to change the facts, that I am a "reduced obese", there most certainly IS a point. I just have to think harder and work HARDER then biology and those who have always been a "normal" weight.

Mantras are great and I use them all the time. I find self talk vital to keeping the weight off (helped as I was getting it off too). And we all have different ones. I have many in fact for use at different times and they change from time to time. We've all got to use ones that ring true to each of us.

toastedsmoke
08-05-2009, 05:48 PM
we are biochemically different in our hunger hormones like insulin and leptin (sad but true). I'm never going to be the same as a person who was never fat...I'll always be what researchers lovingly refer to as "weight reduced obese" or just "reduced obese".

Sorry I know I'm going a little off-point but I've tried to google to find out what the deal is with obesity and insulin and leptin. Well obviously i know obesity is linked to type-2 diabetes and that is insulin-resistance but what's the deal with leptin? Do all obese people have issues with this twosome? I had my annual physical with blood work done 2 months ago and nobody mentioned wonky insulin or leptin levels, I was told the usual "you're fine, but you won't be fine forever if you don't lose weight." Should I be concerned? Is the reduced-obese thing true even when you've maintained a healthy BMI for a while? Again sorry this is off-topic but this is the first I'm hearing of all this.

mandalinn82
08-05-2009, 05:54 PM
Insulin is related to diabetes, but not everyone with a slightly elevated insulin level has diabetes.

Meg wrote an awesome summary of this difference between post-obese and normal-weight folks here in the Maintainers forum.

http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/living-maintenance/51478-some-answers-about-genes-environment-obesity-maintenance.html

The reduced obese thing IS going to be true even if you've been at a healthy weight for a while...but it's not insurmountable. You just have to work (and with 25 lbs lost, you're DEFINITELY working ...:bravo:

JulieJ08
08-05-2009, 05:58 PM
I think it's unlikely you had a leptin level done. It's not a diagnostic criteria for anything, nor a determinant of therapy.

toastedsmoke
08-05-2009, 06:05 PM
Thanks that's exactly what I was looking for. Very informative! And thanks for the encouragement also! :P There's so much inspiration on here! You're where I want to be by summer next year!

rockinrobin
08-05-2009, 06:09 PM
I think it's unlikely you had a leptin level done. It's not a diagnostic criteria for anything, nor a determinant of therapy.

And it most likely wouldn't have changed that drastically at this point.

Toasted, I don't want that article to scare you. I read it quite some time ago and my mouth kinda hung open. It WAS a little scary. But knowing what we're up against is useful. Knowledge is power.

Come hang check out the Maintainer's Forum and you'll see a bunch of us "beating the odds". It's never too early to think about maintaining.

Losing weight and keeping it off - long term - is doable and it really helps, not hinders to know what I'm up against.

That's why for me, it's crucial to "think outside the box". And why 3FC is sooo important.

And why developing skills like you're doing right now (& did last night) is vital.

I look forward to seeing you over at the Maintainer's Forum! :carrot:

toastedsmoke
08-05-2009, 06:10 PM
ok good to know. My inner semi-hypochondriac had rared its ugly head. The leptin info is really interesting though. Something to keep in mind definitely.

Devsmama
08-06-2009, 09:26 AM
While the jury is still out with respect to definitive "proof" of the above, I firmly believe that the MIND is the most powerful organ in the body. If you can conquer your mindset, your old ways of thinking, and if you challenge yourself to believe and act in new ways REGARDLESS of what you believe your limitations are, you'd be AMAZED at what you can achieve.

And whether or not there is proof of THAT is to me immaterial -- I think we all choose our realities in many senses, and I prefer to believe that I can LIVE the dream rather than feel "doomed" (so to speak) to a life of obesity.

If I wanna BE it, I gotta LIVE it, and if I wanna LIVE it, I gotta BELIEVE it, and if I wanna BELIEVE it, I gotta THINK it. It all starts (and ends) with the mind...if I truly think that biology is forever and unchangeably against me, then what's the point? I choose to believe otherwise.

Kira

Well said and I agree completely.

LisaF
08-06-2009, 10:27 AM
I haven't chimed in on this thread before because I was really interested in what everyone else had to say. I have to admit that when I saw the subject line my first instinct was to say, "**** no!" But that's me, and I have a bad history with emotional eating. So I thought about it for a few days, and here's what I've come up with:

It depends on the person. No, really.

If the question was, "Is it ever okay to drink because you're upset?" my answer would be "sure!" And I know that there are others who would say, "**** no!" But it's fine for me, because I don't have a drinking problem, I don't drink very often, and so it's perfectly reasonable to me to have a drink or two to unwind at the end of a difficult day. It's not a habit of mine - I do it maybe a couple of times a year - and it doesn't present a problem for me emotionally, physically, calorie-wise, or in any other way.

So, on the subject of emotional eating: Will it cause you problems if you do it? (Problems of any kind - emotional, physical, caloric, etc.) Will it leave you feeling better or worse afterwards? Is it something that you feel the need to do all the time? Are you afraid it will become a negative pattern for you? Once you answer those questions, you can answer the question of, "Is it ever okay?"

I'm really glad you brought this up, because it gave me a chance to think this through and also to remind myself that just because something is wrong for me doesn't me it's wrong for everyone.

Lisa

Onederchic
08-11-2009, 08:04 PM
the beauty of this website is that were talking to people who understand...just as i cant understand an addiction to alcohol or smoking, there are people who thing were just lazy...thats why its so important to stay in touch on bad days as well as good days...sometimes , not always, we can talk each other off of the ledge...have a great day everyone


I agree!!