Weight Loss Support - The 5 WORST Weight Loss Myths




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QuilterInVA
07-07-2009, 10:59 AM
From:
http://blogs.discovery.com/jonathan_ross/2009/06/lose-weight-or-loose-weight-the-5-worst-******************s.html


"Lose" Weight or "Loose" Weight? The 5 WORST Weight Loss Myths
June 19, 2009

You see it all the time - the stats on dieting and weight loss: Each year, 45 million people spend $30 billion on dieting and weight loss products. With all these resources being devoted to weight loss, you would think that the general level of knowledge would be getting better all the time. Nope.

People don't even know how to spell it - even though they want it so bad that they can almost taste it.

Many times per day I see people writing that they want to "loose" weight, and I've even seen people typing "Biggest Looser" when referring to the TV show. With widespread confusion over how to properly spell "lose" weight, it's only natural that many insidious weight loss myths that only serve to confuse and frustrate millions of people continue to persist - and that some people and companies continue to shamelessly profit from promoting and selling products based on these myths. 40%20Fat%20Grams%20is%20the%20new%2030

I've put together a list of the 5 Worst Weight Loss Myths and some of them are things you might even hear from reputable experts. Here's the list with details to follow:

1. A Calorie is a Calorie (aka All Calories Are Created Equal)
2. Detox Diets Can Help You Lose Weight and Be Healthy
3. There is No Such Thing as a Bad Food
4. What You Put ON You Will Get Results
5. You Should Weigh Yourself Every Day

Follow the link above for the rest...


beerab
07-07-2009, 11:15 AM
The detox one is right on IMO- I spent some time the other day convincing my friend she doesn't need to waste money on a detox juice- that her body is the best detoxer there is!

Fox
07-07-2009, 11:22 AM
oh the detox thing kills me! My mom habitually goes on a detox kick once a year and eats only plain brown rice and steamed veggies with no seasonings for 1-2 weeks. She claims it gets rid of all the "bad stuff" in her body.


L R K
07-07-2009, 11:29 AM
Thanks for sharing, very interesting.

Mrs Snark
07-07-2009, 11:44 AM
If you need daily weigh-ins for life, you're stuck in 1st grade of health school.

Feeling fit, capable, and comfortable in your own skin is the end result of a successful journey to health. A lifetime of daily weigh-ins shows an immaturity/lack of evolution of thought about health and weight that will make long-term progress difficult. Always looking over your shoulder in fear of the weight sneaking back up on you will prevent you from living.

I definitely don't agree with this.

RealCdn
07-07-2009, 11:45 AM
1 - All Calories Are Not Created Equal

Suppose you had a choice between two meals, each consisting of 500 calories. Those who believe this myth would have you believe that there is no difference in the response of the human body to 500 calories of table sugar as opposed to 500 calories of fruits, veggies, and lean proteins. You'd really have to be a simple-minded person to truly believe this. Intuitively, anyone with even a grade-school understanding of human biology knows this can't be true. But many people want a simple answer to life even when having one isn't appropriate or possible so this myth persists.


Although I like the article in general, more studies have shown that controlling calorie intake (no matter what you eat) is how you lose weight. Don't get me wrong, I eat the fruits, veggies, and lean proteins.... however... the concept that you can eat more of certain foods and lose weight is false.

I know, in this case the author is comparing 500 cals of sugar to 500 cals of real food. I've just seen way too many people pushing the concept of 'if you don't eat this very specific way' kinds of eating. I'm a firm believer that if you want to work in a little something that you miss, go for it. If you don't there's a good chance you'll find yourself gorging on it in the near future.

A lot of people (myself included) have success with higher protein, moderate fat, moderate (even low depending on who defines low) carb. However, there are plenty of cultures and individuals who maintain a healthy weight eating higher carb/fat combos and considerably lower protein. My mother eats more calories than me (primarily the extra comes from chocolate and candy) and maintains her ~120lb weight. She simply moves around enough to compensate for it.

ETA - oops, I meant to add that I have found in the past that daily weighing was a good exercise. It showed me how my body responded to alcohol (dehydrate - lower weight), weight lifting (sore muscles - higher weight), etc. I've gotten away from it lately, doing weekly weigh-ins, but I would never tell people that they shouldn't do it. Having said that there are a lot of people who can't handle the daily weight, and up/down will define how their day goes.

Rebound
07-07-2009, 11:53 AM
I disagree at least in part with three of those five points. The weighing every day one FOR SURE.

The "bad food" one and the "calories are different" points for similar reasons.

There are no bad foods. Being "bad" is a moral judgment that can't apply to food. There may be foods that are healthier than others, but if there is a food that you like and that you can work into your eating plan in moderation there is no need to pass a moral judgment on a food. If eating a small order of french fries every other week makes a person happy why shouldn't they do it?!

And the calories are different point is vastly oversimplified and non-specific. The "response of the human body" isn't what people are worried about, it's weight loss. A person couldn't live on 1200 calories of table sugar and feel very well. However, a person can't live on 1200 calories of carrots or 1200 calories of lean chicken or 1200 calories of apples, either. And saying that "Intuitively, anyone with even a grade-school understanding of human biology knows this can't be true" is a pretty ridiculous statement in a scientific-fallacy sort of way.

Moralia
07-07-2009, 12:21 PM
I definitely don't agree with this.

I ditto this! I think weighing yourself daily is fine.. especially if you're had a long, tough battle with your weight! It's a 'tool' to be used... and I see nothing wrong with daily weighing.

mandalinn82
07-07-2009, 12:21 PM
I must disagree with the "Weigh Yourself Every Day" one...clearly, the author has missed the studies from the National Weight Control Registry about people who successfully maintain weight weighing themselves regularly. It's one of the top habits successful maintainers have. So I have to say, that one doesn't seem right.

I also have to disagree with the idea that there are "bad" foods. When did we start putting moral judgments on foods??? There are foods that contribute very little nutritionally to our day. There are foods that are nutritional powerhouses. There are foods that fall somewhere in the middle. There are foods that make some people crave lots of other foods, there are foods that eliminate or reduce those cravings. Foods are ITEMS. They can have varied effects. But to call them "bad" puts a moral judgment on an inanimate object. Makes me batty. Plus, eating -one- of a "bad" food didn't ever hurt anyone (unless they choked on it). So when eaten once, a "bad" food is more a "neutral" food. I'd really like to see us abandon the whole discussion of "good" vs. "bad" foods and move away from value-laden words into words that express what the food does...ie "Good nutritional bargain" or "has a significant raising effect on blood sugar".

rockinrobin
07-07-2009, 12:24 PM
Feeling fit, capable, and comfortable in your own skin is the end result of a successful journey to health. A lifetime of daily weigh-ins shows an immaturity/lack of evolution of thought about health and weight that will make long-term progress difficult. Always looking over your shoulder in fear of the weight sneaking back up on you will prevent you from living.

I'm with Tyler. This is absolutely ridiculous.

It's all ridiculous. And horribly, horribly worded. Just awful But this line in particular has gotten to me the most: "Always looking over your shoulder in fear of the weight sneaking back up on you will prevent you from living."

I think many, many people think that they're cured, ease up and then quickly fall back into old habits and THAT'S when the weight starts to creep back on and before you know it, you've gained back all the weight plus more. Therefore I will ALWAYS be looking over my shoulder. ALWAYS.

mandalinn82
07-07-2009, 12:37 PM
I have to further expound on my "Bad" foods discussion. Now we get into the issue of...bad for WHO??

What is "bad" for a Type II Diabetic whose blood sugar is a big high might be lifesaving for a Type I Diabetic whose blood sugar is dangerously low.

What is "bad" for an adult may be good or recommended for a younger child (like whole milk)

What is "bad" for someone attempting to lose weight may be good or recommended as part of the therapy for someone with an eating disorder (Once, after I got really caught up in "good" vs "bad" foods, my therapist prescribed me a guilt-free cheeseburger and fries, to convince me that eating wasn't bad and wasn't going to hurt me. It was absolutely a "good" food for me at that time, because I needed the message that I could have one, enjoy it, and control my reaction with little impact on my weight).

jendiet
07-07-2009, 12:42 PM
I disagree with the weighing everyday simply because I DO weigh everyday but I avg my weights for the week. Which is why my ticker says 185 but the scale read 181 today. too many fluctuations. It would be BAD for someone that does not understand the biology of water weight, muscle weight and fat weight in response to diet and circumstances but just fine for an avid dieter and exerciser--especially somebody at goal and maintaining.

I also don't believe your body does NOT need help with detoxing. If that was true so many people would not have drastic improvements in diseases such as liver disease, and certain cancers. The colon is the place most often in need of detox. If we used our bodies the way they were designed--we would not need to detox. But a low fiber/ high sugar/ high protein diet causes a rancid colon. meat goes rancid in the gut because there is not enough fiber to push the excess material out. Candida growth goes unchecked because of the use of antibiotics and not replacing good intestinal flora with probiotics as well as the constant sugar feeding (yeast make YOU crave sugar) Your body builds up levels of pesticides, metals, and hormones that are contained in your food (that naturally wouldn't be there). Therefore your chemical signals can go haywire because of unnatural hormones competing for receptors of natural hormones.

A simple colon cleanse can remove years of built up gunk that is causing poor absorption of nutrients and a fast can give your body the break it needs to clean up cellular debris that is clogging other pathways. If you look at a person eating healthy and clean food compared to someone on a diet of coke, fast food, and cigarettes--there is a MAJOR difference in skin tone, wrinkles, eye brightness, etc. To name a few things.

Rebound
07-07-2009, 12:53 PM
You want a "simple colon cleanse?" Eat some Fiber One a drink a glass of water.

Jacquie668
07-07-2009, 01:04 PM
I may be the only one and while I agree that our bodies do detox naturally and personally I feel that any time someone does start adopting a healthy lifestyle, they do go through a "detox" phase where they get all that sugar, caffeine, and whatever out of their body.

I remember when I did the master cleanse, that sucked and I quickly realized how bad it is for me. Now that part, I DO agree with. However, when I went out and purchased my juicer and produce and then juiced for 30 days I didn't starve, I went through a **** of a "detox" and came out of it lighter and without a handful of old habits like sugar addiction, caffeine, dairy (that was a big one for me, dairy hurts my body, lactose intolerant among other things). Did I gain all my weight back? No, I gained back 8 pounds because when you go from drinking juice to eating solid food your body makes an adjustment and you're carrying around solid foods.

I didn't and WON'T do enemas, but the juicer I bought left plenty of pulp left behind so I didn't have any problems in that department. I lost 30 pounds of weight, I came out of it and I struggled, but I continued to loose until now where I'm stuck, but I'm stuck for emotional reasons really.

A juice feast/fast is considered a detox/weight loss/cleansing diet, but if you're doing it right you're still getting your calories and you're not hungry, you're still getting your nutrients even if you use supplements yadda yadda. Some people would think that is crazy, but I don't eat meat, I don't eat dairy, and I want to merge comfortably into a raw food lifestyle. For me drinking my salads isn't that much of a leap. For other people it certainly would be.

I don't agree that all "detox diets" are a sham as I find that too generalizing for me personally. I do think that things like the Master Cleanse are a scam and should be avoided because you are only drinking spicy sugar water for 10-? days.

I do think you can take a day or two, meditate, drink smoothies or juice or tea and cleanse yourself inside and out. That to me isn't a sham, but it probably would be more of an emotional detox than anything hehe. ;)

jendiet
07-07-2009, 01:13 PM
I am talking about a little more depth than what you get with fiber one. It takes a little more than that to get rid of years of junk. I like pp idea of the juice fast. Yes the juices have fiber that help your body get rid of gunk. So that is a good cleanse. Although I don't agree with things like the Hollywood Diet or such--they can have some benefits.

sacha
07-07-2009, 02:00 PM
Sorry, but once you really get into exercising, the scale means nothing. I am much stronger and leaner now 10lbs heavier.

Check this out... this woman weights 10lbs more than before. People are too fixated on numbers.

http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=117376171

jendiet
07-07-2009, 02:08 PM
i agree to a point with you. sacha...the scale doesn't mean alot to a person that has a 20% BMI at 160 lbs.

muscle is more dense than fat...so if you put on more muscle--you can weigh the same or more than a person who is obese. The same weight fat takes up more space as the same weight of muscle.

JulieJ08
07-07-2009, 02:12 PM
LOL, all good points, but I'm still laughing that it's only natural that poor spelling leads to persistent weight loss myths and shameless business practices.

Many times per day I see people writing that they want to "loose" weight, and I've even seen people typing "Biggest Looser" when referring to the TV show. With widespread confusion over how to properly spell "lose" weight, it's only natural that many insidious weight loss myths that only serve to confuse and frustrate millions of people continue to persist - and that some people and companies continue to shamelessly profit from promoting and selling products based on these myths.
Jonathan Ross
National Body Challenge Fitness Expert

sacha
07-07-2009, 02:13 PM
I agree with you as well. It just hurts me to see so many women upset over their scale # for the day and get upset over it. It's important to moniter progress, but the focus on numbers takes away from a healthy outlook.

I wake up at 121lbs, I take a pee and I'm at 119-121lbs, I go out for sushi and a few drinks I'm at 126lbs, then I get up in the morning and back down to 121lbs. It happens. I don't stress about it - but I've been at my maintenance for 4 years now. Many women here get so upset, some cry, and some even give up their journey. I really wish they would chuck out that scale and realize that they are sabatoging themselves.

If people can do it, then great, more power to them. I'm not so sure many people can really do that.

JulieJ08
07-07-2009, 02:15 PM
If people can do it, then great, more power to them. I'm not so sure many people can really do that.

I'm not sure whether you mean most people can't chuck out the scale, or most people can't take daily weighing without getting upset?

jendiet
07-07-2009, 02:20 PM
I think for some people daily weighing is a tool for successful maintenance. I know if I HAD a scale when I began to let myself go out of grief of a dissolved relationship--it would have been a reality check. And i would have corrected more sooner.

Yes, you definitely have to understand the physiology of why certain foods cause the scale to go up, how using the bathroom makes it go down. How after exercise it will go up--not down due to influx of water to muscle tissue--i don't think that would be a problem for someone who has taken the initiative to get to their goal weight and wishes to maintain with the aid of th e scale. It is a good idea to set a range of 5 lbs. If you see yourself getting past 5 lbs from goal--it's time to adjust something.

sacha
07-07-2009, 02:26 PM
I think for some people daily weighing is a tool for successful maintenance. I know if I HAD a scale when I began to let myself go out of grief of a dissolved relationship--it would have been a reality check. And i would have corrected more sooner.

Yes, you definitely have to understand the physiology of why certain foods cause the scale to go up, how using the bathroom makes it go down. How after exercise it will go up--not down due to influx of water to muscle tissue--i don't think that would be a problem for someone who has taken the initiative to get to their goal weight and wishes to maintain with the aid of th e scale. It is a good idea to set a range of 5 lbs. If you see yourself getting past 5 lbs from goal--it's time to adjust something.

True, I think you really have a good attitude for this, I'm sure you will find luck with your goals!

Julie~ I'd say see the scale without getting upset. Even I have trouble seeing the weight gain which is from building muscle. Sounds crazy. I suppose it is the programming ingrained in our brains that gaining is "bad".

thisisnotatest
07-07-2009, 05:12 PM
Myth # 6-there is one way to lose weight.

This whole article was obnoxious and uninformed.
I can site examples to support and denounce each of his 'myths'
Basically, who cares what this misc dude says. When are we going to stop looking for answers outside of what our own body is telling us.
We have access to our bodies 24/7-listen to it, not the latest joe shmoe touting "blah blah blah is the way to successful weightloss and everything else is wrong".

kiramira
07-07-2009, 05:21 PM
The author has a Bachelor of Science degree in ASTRONOMY!!!
:rofl:
Maybe his logic is valid on Mars...or Jupiter...HEY, you weigh LESS on Mercury, so if we all weigh in THERE we'll all be at our "ideal weights"...

Kira

ps - it's pronouced spa-CHEH-man, not spaceman...(30 Rock)

amynbebes
07-07-2009, 07:10 PM
I know that regarding the scale for me that I'm an out of sight out of mind (or rather ignore the truth) type of person. To keep on top of my weight I have to weigh rather regularly.

glitterducky
07-07-2009, 08:13 PM
Personally I don't believe in good or bad foods. Foods don't have behavior or moral values, it has no concepts of ethics or beliefs. It's just that. It's food. It's made to be eaten, digested and broken down, and then either stored as fat or pooped out. So to say that a food is bad or good is silly.

I think you can truely eat anything you want, even fast food, but with all things, moderation must be keyed. Sure, you can go to Taco Bell for lunch, eat your heart out. But understand what the high contents of calories, fats and sugars are doing on a biological level to your body. You didn't use the energy from that extra taco? Guess what, it's going to be stored as fat. You went out and ran 6 miles after eating it? Good, it's probably all gone now. But there are no moral objections tied to food. You feel guilty after eating that Taco Bell lunch because you know it's taken away from your hard work, you know you're going to have to spend five extra minutes walking. The food is not giving you a guilt trip, you are.

Ija
07-07-2009, 08:38 PM
Sorry, but once you really get into exercising, the scale means nothing. I am much stronger and leaner now 10lbs heavier.

Check this out... this woman weights 10lbs more than before. People are too fixated on numbers.

http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php?t=117376171

Thanks for posting that sacha, I totally agree. Personally, I find that the closer I get to my goal body, the less the scale actually matters. While it may have been a useful tool when I had a lot to lose, the numbers don't mean very much anymore. They don't tell me about my fitness or body composition.

You can be 125 pounds and be fat, or 125 pounds and be lean, but the scale won't know the difference.

LandonsBaby
07-08-2009, 12:09 AM
I also don't believe your body does NOT need help with detoxing. If that was true so many people would not have drastic improvements in diseases such as liver disease, and certain cancers. The colon is the place most often in need of detox. If we used our bodies the way they were designed--we would not need to detox. But a low fiber/ high sugar/ high protein diet causes a rancid colon. meat goes rancid in the gut because there is not enough fiber to push the excess material out. Candida growth goes unchecked because of the use of antibiotics and not replacing good intestinal flora with probiotics as well as the constant sugar feeding (yeast make YOU crave sugar) Your body builds up levels of pesticides, metals, and hormones that are contained in your food (that naturally wouldn't be there). Therefore your chemical signals can go haywire because of unnatural hormones competing for receptors of natural hormones.

A simple colon cleanse can remove years of built up gunk that is causing poor absorption of nutrients and a fast can give your body the break it needs to clean up cellular debris that is clogging other pathways. If you look at a person eating healthy and clean food compared to someone on a diet of coke, fast food, and cigarettes--there is a MAJOR difference in skin tone, wrinkles, eye brightness, etc. To name a few things.

I agree with this. Detoxing can be good for the liver as well as the rest of the body. It doesn't have to be a "sham". You don't need anything special at all to detox.

kaplods
07-08-2009, 01:10 AM
I agree with the main points of the article, but I think that some of the logic and examples were poor.

1 - All Calories Are Not Created Equal

Are we talking for health, or for weight loss? The article makes it clear that the author is talking about health. If only weight loss matters to you, you can try and may even lose weight on an all snicker bar diet. I can bet you're not going to feel great for long on such a diet.

Even in terms of weight loss, I can think of at least one undisputed example in which a calorie is not a calorie. Dietary fiber has calories (because anything that can burn does). Like other carbohydrates, it has 4 calories per gram, but humans can't digest it, so you can eat all the hay your stomach can hold, and you're still going to starve to death.

Lower GI/GL eating does keep my hunger under control better than calorie counting of high GI foods, and processed carbs tend to trigger some health problems for me. It's another way in which calories aren't the whole picture for some people, either weight or health wise.

2 - Detox Diets are a Sham - Period

There's no way to convince anyone who has spent money on these programs that they were a waste of money, especially since they often notice feeling much better after or during these detoxes (though there's a physiological reason for this, aside from the psychological benefit of placebo - and that's the endorphins that are released by the mild trauma detoxes and colonics trigger).

I agree that some cleanses might have some benefit if a person is eating an unhealthy diet (see myth #1 and #3). However, if you take the advice in #1 and #3 to heart, and are eating foods that are moving you closer to health, not away from it, then you have no need of "cleansing."

3 - Are You Kidding? There Are Lots of Bad Foods!

I think this is a matter of interpretation. I agree that linking food to morality is generally misguided and counterproductive, but I agree with the author's point that "anything you eat is either moving you closer to health or farther away from it."

4 - It's What You Put IN You That Matters; Not What You Put ON You

There's no empirical support for any topical weight loss product, but like #2, people who've spent money on these products, aren't likely to admit to others or themselves that they were ripped off. Some products do seem to have a minor effect on the appearance of the skin (such as some of the cellulite creams), but the effect is very small and is not acheiving any weight loss, just a minor cosmetic change that will disappear when the product is no longer being used.

5 - At Some Point, Weight Must Become Almost Meaningless

I agree with this, but I feel the author gives one good example (the formerly 300 lb woman who could not appreciate her success because her weight loss was stalling at 160 lbs), and also one bad example, "If you need daily weigh-ins for life, you're stuck in 1st grade of health school."

Maybe it's just a matter of phrasing. I do not know that I will "need" daily weigh-ins at my goal weight, but I probalby will continue to use daily weigh-ins as a tool.

As for weight becoming almost meaningless, I tend to agree, because I believe it's the only reason I'm succeeding now. All other weight loss attempts I made, were strictly "by the scale." Weight loss was the only important goal, I could not have cared less about my health. "The means justify the ends," I thought. This time around, the weight loss is not the goal, it's not even the reward, it's more a lucky byproduct.

I don't think that "health" should ever be separated from weight loss. Weight loss by any means, isn't always healthy, and weight lost by unhealthy habits has a tendency to return.


Most of the points made are good (though not perfect), but the author doesn't use the best examples.

Tealeaf
07-08-2009, 06:13 AM
I'm pretty certain that if I didn't constantly monitor my weight, I would be end up at my old weight for sure. Yeah, it's just a number. But if the number is ever increasing (as it has been for me for the past few months) it's a clue that it's time to do something different. I agree that it's certainly possible to get over obessed with the number on the scale, but I feel that simply ignoring it and "living life" is no recipe for long term success.

I also have issues with the author's "food is either good or bad!" assertation. There are shades of grey. Eating fried chicken once every three months isn't going to irrepairly harm anyone's health. A healthy general lifestyle will simply not be undone by eating one slice of pie. Eating several could be a problem of course, but if you keep tabs on your general weight you can better judge if it is becoming a problem or not.

rockinrobin
07-08-2009, 06:37 AM
I think frequent weighing is a necessity IF one wants to keep the weight off permanently. 2 -3 lbs can quickly and easily turn into 5 - 6 lbs, which can turn into 9 - 10 lbs, which can turn into 15 and so on and so on. The scale is a tool that is available to us. A quick and convenient way to assess - what we weigh. No reason to fear it or shy away from it. It's available - it provides certain information, certain VITAL information concerning our health. Why not use it?

Ija
07-08-2009, 07:55 AM
For me, the goal is maintaining a lean, fit body, not a specific weight. One can very easily gain fat while maintaining her weight. One can also become more lean while maintaining, and even gaining more weight. I'm not saying that the scale has no place for anyone, but it's important to remember that just because it shows a number you like doesn't necessarily mean you're "maintaining."

rockinrobin
07-08-2009, 08:44 AM
For me, the goal is maintaining a lean, fit body, not a specific weight. One can very easily gain fat while maintaining her weight. One can also become more lean while maintaining, and even gaining more weight. I'm not saying that the scale has no place for anyone, but it's important to remember that just because it shows a number you like doesn't necessarily mean you're "maintaining."

Not so sure I agree with this. I think it wouldn't be THAT easy to gain fat while maintaining the same weight.

I do think that staying within a certain weight (range) is a fairly good indicator of maintaining. Not the only thing to consider of course, but it is an easy, quick and valuable tool to be used along side with other things.

I'm not sure why the scale gets such a bad rap. It is what it is. Nothing more. Nothing less. :dunno:

Ija
07-08-2009, 09:33 AM
Not so sure I agree with this. I think it wouldn't be THAT easy to gain fat while maintaining the same weight.

I do think that staying within a certain weight (range) is a fairly good indicator of maintaining. Not the only thing to consider of course, but it is an easy, quick and valuable tool to be used along side with other things.

I'm not sure why the scale gets such a bad rap. It is what it is. Nothing more. Nothing less. :dunno:

Actually, people gain fat while keeping their weight consistent all the time. I think many dieters underestimate both the degree and the impact of loss of lean mass. I know I did for a long time. I've since recovered, hence the devaluation of the scale ;)

rockinrobin
07-08-2009, 09:47 AM
Actually, people gain fat while keeping their weight consistent all the time. I think many dieters underestimate both the degree and the impact of loss of lean mass. I know I did for a long time. I've since recovered, hence the devaluation of the scale ;)

Hmm. Maybe "dieters " underestimate it, but lifestyle changers, maybe, just maybe, not as much. ;)

Mrs Snark
07-08-2009, 09:55 AM
I just don't see the scale becoming less useful as a tool to track what I'm doing. I'm happy to add weight if it is lean muscle mass, I'll certainly accept a higher number on the scale for that.

Ija
07-08-2009, 09:57 AM
Whether you're on a temporary diet or you've changed your lifestyle, if you're not taking important steps to preserve your lean mass, your body composition will shift in an undesirable direction.

Rebound
07-08-2009, 10:41 AM
I just don't see the scale becoming less useful as a tool to track what I'm doing. I'm happy to add weight if it is lean muscle mass, I'll certainly accept a higher number on the scale for that.

Exactly.

I think for any reasonably bright and sane person, I should be able to figure out what is going on if I am getting heavier or staying the same weight and yet my measurements are going down (or staying the same), my clothes are getting looser (or staying the same), and this is happening at the same time that I'm working out more or am lifting weights.

Honestly, to suggest that we are stupid enough to NOT grasp this concept is a little insulting. Everyone's seen the pound of fat versus a pound of muscle. If my measurements are going down and my weight isn't changing I KNOW what is happening.

And if someone can't grasp that concept and is so fixated on a number and getting smaller isn't enough for them, I promise you that the scale is the least of her problems and she was going to fail eventually anyway...

Not to be harsh, but saying that weighing everyday is childish and somehow makes us less successful is insane and kind of annoying. Weighing daily or weekly AND paying attention to measurements and/or waistbands is a proven way to maintain!

sacha
07-08-2009, 10:50 AM
Honestly, to suggest that we are stupid enough to NOT grasp this concept is a little insulting. Everyone's seen the pound of fat versus a pound of muscle. If my measurements are going down and my weight isn't changing I KNOW what is happening.

And if someone can't grasp that concept and is so fixated on a number and getting smaller isn't enough for them, I promise you that the scale is the least of her problems and she was going to fail eventually anyway...

Not to be harsh, but saying that weighing everyday is childish and somehow makes us less successful is insane and kind of annoying. Weighing daily or weekly AND paying attention to measurements and/or waistbands is a proven way to maintain!

I'm sorry you feel that way, I don't think anyone wanted to suggest that those who weighed daily were stupid, childish, or less successful. I suppose it is a suggestion for those who are too fixated on numbers. I understand that a lot of girls here can weight themselves daily and be okay with it, but I see twice or triple as many posts from women who are at a breaking point because they have gained 1lb or have only lost 1lb. It's sad. I suppose this only applies to those women (and men).

Rebound
07-08-2009, 10:56 AM
I'm sorry you feel that way, I don't think anyone wanted to suggest that those who weighed daily were stupid, childish, or less successful.

The article said that, not people on this board. The article said "If you need daily weigh-ins for life, you're stuck in 1st grade of health school." It was that to which I was referring.

And I wasn't trying to demean those people who are fixated on numbers, only suggest that until they get past that point, they are going to have problems with the lifestyle change they are attempting. It's not the act of weighing that is the problem (as suggested in the article), it is the attitude of the weigher. And the lifestyle change is never going to work until someone realizes that a scale is a tool, not the Holy Grail, and learns to listen to the other signs of their bodies (i.e. measurements and waistbands).

It's early for me still and I'm a little stressed by a week-long MIL visit. Perhaps I was a bit brusque. If so, I apologize!

sacha
07-08-2009, 10:59 AM
The article said that, not people on this board. The article said "If you need daily weigh-ins for life, you're stuck in 1st grade of health school." It was that to which I was referring.

And I wasn't trying to demean those people who are fixated on numbers, only suggest that until they get past that point, they are going to have problems with the lifestyle change they are attempting. It's not the act of weighing that is the problem (as suggested in the article), it is the attitude of the weigher. And the lifestyle change is never going to work until someone realizes that a scale is a tool, not the Holy Grail, and learns to listen to the other signs of their bodies (i.e. measurements and waistbands).

It's early for me still and I'm a little stressed by a week-long MIL visit. Perhaps I was a bit brusque. If so, I apologize!

Ugh, MIL! Don't worry :) The article just proves that everyone seems to have the magic solution. Nobody has the magic solution except their own willpower and determination!

Shannon in ATL
07-08-2009, 11:01 AM
Actually, people gain fat while keeping their weight consistent all the time. I think many dieters underestimate both the degree and the impact of loss of lean mass. I know I did for a long time. I've since recovered, hence the devaluation of the scale ;)

Drina - I'm not trying to be argumentative with this question at all, I promise, I'm just trying to wrap my head around what you are saying. I know that a person can be 'skinny fat' and can be leaner and tight at a higher weight, what I can't figure out is how you can lose lean mass and gain fat while maintaining the same weight? If you lose the lean mass and add equivalent volume of fat wouldn't you weigh more?

Shannon in ATL
07-08-2009, 11:09 AM
I've been maintaining for about ten months and I started weighing every day back in February. I have a spreadsheet that I enter the numbers into and then generate a cute little graph with my trend compared to high and low redlines. I have an obsessive, somewhat addictive, personality, and the daily weighing, while appearing obsessive from the outside actually helps me control that crazy. When I was weighing weekly during weight loss I thought about the scale all the time. When I first started maintaining I thought that would settle down, but it didn't. I thought about the scale even more often, then, worried about what the higher calorie intake would do to my weight. Tracking the number every day and being able to quickly glance at my average lets me better understand blips without panic. Plus, I have found it fascinating to look at the impact different things have on my system - exercise, a milkshake, a low or high calorie day, a five mile run, etc. It has given me a much greater understanding of how my body works. I know that I weigh a little higher now than I did because of the strength training I've done, and I can track that increase over time, as well.

And, I do tend to pay more attention to my clothes fit than to the scale. I just really like numbers and excel graphs. :)

rockinrobin
07-08-2009, 11:09 AM
I just don't see the scale becoming less useful as a tool to track what I'm doing. I'm happy to add weight if it is lean muscle mass, I'll certainly accept a higher number on the scale for that.

Thanks Tyler. That's exactly the point I was trying to get across, but couldn't find the right words.

Ija
07-08-2009, 11:19 AM
Shannon, if you equate volume, you would actually weigh less while getting fatter. For example, say you gain 500 cc of fat and lose 500 cc of muscle. Since muscle tissue is more dense, 500 cc of muscle (which you've lost) weighs more than the same volume of fat (which you've gained), so you'll weigh less even though you've gained fat. On the other hand, if you equate mass, you would weigh the same but be a little larger. That would be like losing a pound of muscle and gaining a pound of fat. The number on the scale stays the same, but you're a little bit flabbier than you were before.

kaplods
07-08-2009, 12:09 PM
I think the author made a couple big mistakes in the fifth point.

Firstly, I think that "at some point, weight must becomes almost meaningless" is an overstatement. I thing a better point would be that "at some point, it becomes less about the "number" on the scale, and more about other health indicators. Which still is not to say that the scale becomes completely useless as a tool (which the the author does not claim).

I think the author makes an error in assuming that a person who weighs daily cannot be at a state where the weight (specific number) is not the only or primary focus. I would argue that it's a sixth myth (and one the author falls for) that weighing daily is "obsessive" and cannot be healthy.

Weighing daily has become like brushing my teeth. Just as brushing my teeth daily is not obsessive, neither is stepping on the scale - but the key is in how much emphasis and significance I place on the morning weigh in. If seeing a small gain on the scale "ruins my day," then I think that isn't a very mature attitude towards the scale. Especially if I know that the weight gain is due to, say for example, TOM - is it very mature to get depressed over a normal weight fluctuation?

I agree that letting weight control be your entire existence, is counter-productive. And it IS a common approach to weight loss, which is why I think it's often temporary. If weight loss or control becomes your entire existence, there's a good chance that you're going to wake up one day and want more to life, and abandon the "project."

That, I believe, was my biggest mistake every single time I tried to lose weight in the past. 35 years of making weight loss my life, until I couldn't stand it any more and wanted some life in my life, and would abandon the attempt. Incorporating weight loss/maintence into my life has become much more successful. That I think is the real point of Myth 5 - that it can't become only about the number on the scale. It has to be about a lot of other things, and in the scheme of things the number isn't the most important.

We all know people who are happy with a number, and very unhappy with any other number. If you're ecstatic with 130, and deeply depressed at 131, you're going to have a lot of unneccesary stress and drama in your life.

Jacquie668
07-08-2009, 12:19 PM
My problem with this philosophy of "the scale stays the same even if you blah blah" is that we do look at our bodies, how our clothes fit, what kind of exercise we are doing, etc. I mean to say the scale is misleading, well yeah it is, but it is a tool with a use that IS essential, but that depends on where you are in your journey. I mean I'm 280 pounds right now, knowing how much I weigh is important. Getting the fat off is equally, if not more, important. Yeah I want to tone and you know build up that lean muscle mass, but to me right now getting the fat off is key so right now I put more emphasis on cardio and am working in toning/weight whatever.

If I'm 140 pounds and I know that I want to tone more and build up my muscles then I'm using the scale differently as I did before. I'm assuming based on what I know about my body and what i know about lean muscle mass that the number blinking on the scale isn't the absolute key. It is a guide for me. If I find my clothes getting tighter and looking at my body I know it isn't muscle mass, well then the scale can confirm my suspicions.

I think someone who is loosing weight versus a person who is maintaining weight loss uses that scale differently. It is a tool and nothing more and nothing less, I think another member said that even.

I mean...I guess my point is that if you're fixating on a number and/or a pant size, then that is a different issue. For me my clothing size is important to me, but I really and honestly care about how my clothes fit so I have no problem getting a size bigger to get my huge hips to be comfortable. I just think there is more going on with people than just standing on a scale and focusing on a number and when we do obsess, and I do at times, then that is when you have to turn away from it and focus on you as a person. However, saying that, I'm still going to use a tool that I find useful in order to gauge where I'm at on my journey. Furthering that, I'll have a scale when I do reach my goal weight as I can weigh myself weekly to see where I'm at. I mean so what if I gain a pound or two? It will happen, my body will fluctuate, but if I'm nearing that 10 pound weight gain and I know that isn't muscle mass because I've been eating fatty foods or something, well that is a red alert and then I can evaluate what is going on and what I need to do to maintain. That is what I think anyhow...

rachinma
07-08-2009, 12:22 PM
If the number on the scale goes up or down, that is an indicator of something. It's up to me to figure out what that is.

Jacqui_D
07-08-2009, 01:12 PM
I have never detoxed and have no plans to detox; however, I immediately picked up on the apparent contradiction in the article that said your body does not need help detoxing but then said if you eat healthily and don't jog near traffic, your body will detox just fine. Okay, and what if you haven't always eaten healthily and/or you do jog near traffic?

I disagree that it's a bad idea to weigh every day. I think for anyone who has struggled with their weight and who is trying to maintain, it could be a useful tool in making sure their weight doesn't creep back up on them.

As for all calories being equal, I agree that they are not. Anyone with insulin problems (diabetes, hypoglycemia, insulin resistance) has trouble with carbs, so in their case especially, it is not just a matter of calories in, calories out.

Tealeaf
07-08-2009, 03:35 PM
I think that if someone is working out hard enough to put on lean muscle mass, they know it. I do my usual cardio and have restarted some lifting, but I have no delusions that my steady gain as of late is due anything other than fat. And I don't think that I'm in the minority when it comes to people who are trying to maintain a weight loss. I think that in the long run, for the vast majority of people out there, the numbers on the scale are about fat loss/gain.