100 lb. Club - Carbs--Does not eating them in evening really help?




MugCanDoIt
06-11-2009, 10:32 AM
Im trying to think of things I can do to speed up my weight loss.

Im exercising, doing around 1600 calories, around 30% fat, and limit my carbs to around 35 or 40 per meal.:yes:

I heard a few on here say they dont eat much carbs in the evening......Im wondering, has it really made a difference? :?: What is your experience?


KnitALisa
06-11-2009, 11:08 AM
I can't eat too many carbs, period. I'm a vegetarian, like you (but I do eat fish), so my meals are PACKED with veggies. But I have no self control when it comes to foods like pasta, bread, etc. When I do have them, I have the whole grain variety.

I wonder if it's not eating many carbs in the evening or not eating in the evening that helps?

beerab
06-11-2009, 11:36 AM
Honestly I don't think limiting a certain food at night helps. No matter what time of day your body processes food the same. But that being said I would go nuts and have a few hundred grams worth of carbs. You can change it up to see- but I had a friend change up his dinners to where he limited carbs and he ended up feeling starved and would go eat something else later.

It might work for you it might not- I know for me I limit carbs overall and my dinners aren't usually full of carbs, mostly lots of protein and veggies.


Trazey34
06-11-2009, 11:47 AM
I'm one of the unlucky ones who can't eat at night LOL Or I guess "Lucky" in that at least i KNOW it??? I eat a nice dinner, have a cup of tea and a little "something" and then the kitchen is CLOSED.

Everyone has weird triggers, like cereal or bread or sweets, stuff like that doesn't bother me at all, it's the little snackies after dinner. I tried to have a small piece of cheese or piece of fruit, but that always led to ...maybe one more little piece? what could it matter??? hahahah So if I avoid it altogether, I don't have a problem! maybe later I can add something back in, but in a strange way I find it very LIBERATING! I used to spend so much time thinking of what to EAT at night, making sure i had enough junk in the house to have 3 or 4 things LOL crazy business!!!!

MugCanDoIt
06-11-2009, 11:50 AM
I used to spend so much time thinking of what to EAT at night, making sure i had enough junk in the house to have 3 or 4 things LOL crazy business!!!!


I know...I used to do this too....not anymore!!:carrot:

DCHound
06-11-2009, 12:04 PM
I can't do carbs regardless of the time of day, but that's just me.

Tummy Girl
06-11-2009, 12:11 PM
I have to be mindful of the carbs always, they are my trigger, my binge food of choice and my water retention nightmare. Other than calories it's the only thing I have to track or I get loonie.

I've found that for me, if I need a night time snack I go for protien, like a hard boiled egg or something. But I'm insulin resistent and I can burn through a carb like it's going outta style, if I had a piece of toast my stomach would be growling, outloud, in literally half an hour, bad business.

kaplods
06-11-2009, 12:12 PM
I also have to drastically limit high carb foods (and also insulin resistant). In fact, if I really want to eat something high carb, I've had some luck (though it's sort of like playing russian roulette) with only eating them right before bed. The trick is in eating it so late that I'm asleep before the insulin spike triggers more hunger. I've got to be dead-tired for it to "work" otherwise I stay awake for hours thinking about food (and sometimes not just thinking, but raiding the fridge as well).

MugCanDoIt
06-11-2009, 01:01 PM
Well a lot of the time I have calories left to consume after I eat supper. So I'll go and eat a bowl of cereal or like two pb sandwiches on 6 NET Carb bread. So I was wondering if maybe that is causing my weight loss to slow some?

CJZee
06-11-2009, 01:06 PM
I remember that Kym Johnson, a "Dancing with the Stars" professional said she NEVER ate any carbs at night ... after 5 p.m. I think. (Except the occasional glass of wine if she was at a party.)

Alana in Canada
06-11-2009, 01:12 PM
I know that before my lifestyle change, I ate a bowl of cereal almost every night before bed.

No, I usually have room left in my plan for a little snack. The other night I had a slice of rye bread, cheese with onion and tomato.

Last night I had 1/2 cup of low fat yogurt and a serving of fruit.

I follow my portion control plan throughout the day--just so I'll know what I may eat for my evening snack.

Devsmama
06-11-2009, 01:56 PM
I eat my carbs early in the day, breakfast and lunch and for dinner there are very few if any carbs or else I would go on a Krispy Kreme binge.

kswood87
06-11-2009, 04:12 PM
I also try and limit my carbs to lunch and dinner and I can't say for sure that it has made a difference but it does give me peace of mind.

thistoo
06-11-2009, 04:13 PM
Carbs are not my friend at any time of day, and for best results I limit them to 15 g or less after breakfast, but if I eat them at night I will GAIN weight, even on a 1200-1400 calorie per day range. Most people do not have that kind of sensitivity, I realize, but it does exist.

TraceyElaine
06-11-2009, 04:33 PM
I know...I used to do this too....not anymore!!:carrot:


LOL me to. I'd buy groceries, go about my day and when night time hit I'd make another trip for like $50 worth of junk. And from all the food groups. Salty, spicey, sweet, frozen, baked haha. It was pretty bad.

mandalinn82
06-11-2009, 04:37 PM
I'm an avid listener to Jillian Michaels, and she discourages carbs within 2-3 hours of bed. Her explanation (and I've not done any research on this to back it up, so I'll just be explaining her opinion) is that HGH (human growth hormone), which is released while we sleep and is a hormone that encourages muscle growth and fat loss, is released at a slower rate when the level of insulin in the blood is higher. So if you eat carbs right before bed, your insulin goes up right before bed, and while you're sleeping, the release of HGH is inhibited.

I do know that HGH release overnight is one of the things that influences fat loss (it doesn't release as well under stress, either, which is why stress can be a factor in weight loss), but haven't thoroughly researched the insulin-HGH link.

Alana in Canada
06-11-2009, 04:52 PM
I do know that HGH release overnight is one of the things that influences fat loss
Aaaah--so that's why sleep is important to weight loss. I'd read that it was, but had forgotten why. Good to know.

Couch
06-11-2009, 09:57 PM
I stopped after hearing Jillian Michaels talk about it in her podcasts too. I was actually surprised at how easy it was, and it resulted in a ~200cal reduction in my evening meal, which has made it much easier to stay within my calorie allowance for the day.

TraceyElaine
06-12-2009, 07:32 AM
is that HGH (human growth hormone), which is released while we sleep and is a hormone that encourages muscle growth and fat loss, is released at a slower rate when the level of insulin in the blood is higher. So if you eat carbs right before bed, your insulin goes up right before bed, and while you're sleeping, the release of HGH is inhibited.

HGH link.

That's a useful tidbit right there. I had heard something like that before but had forgotten it. I knew eating at night was frowned upon but didn't know why. I like to know the reasoning behind things. Night time eating was a huge problem for me.

synger
06-12-2009, 09:06 AM
There's another whole school of thought (championed by the books Potatoes not Prozac, and The Feel-Good Diet), that suggests that if you are eating a mostly lower-carb, higher-protein diet it will raise your tryptophan (which you get from protein). Then, if you have a small complex-carbohydrate snack right before bed, without protein, it will fuel the process that increases seratonin from the tryptophan. (If you eat protein with the carb, it inhibits the making of seratonin).

Seratonin is your "feel-good" hormone, and many people, especially dieters, are low on it.

So you may actually WANT to include a small carb snack into your night-time plan... depends on what your goals are and what works for you. So I sometimes eat a few Triscuits or Ak-Mak crackers before bed.

JulieJ08
06-12-2009, 12:47 PM
There's another whole school of thought (championed by the books Potatoes not Prozac, and The Feel-Good Diet), that suggests that if you are eating a mostly lower-carb, higher-protein diet it will raise your tryptophan (which you get from protein). Then, if you have a small complex-carbohydrate snack right before bed, without protein, it will fuel the process that increases seratonin from the tryptophan. (If you eat protein with the carb, it inhibits the making of seratonin).

Seratonin is your "feel-good" hormone, and many people, especially dieters, are low on it.

I read something about that last weekend, but not enough to figure out what I thought of it. Can't remember what book it was.

AtlGirl
06-12-2009, 01:34 PM
Ive been limiting carbs in the evening as well. Not so much for added weight loss but primarily to keep the cravings at bay. If I have pasta for dinner then I'm libel to drive down to McDonalds at midnight for a milkshake. Carbs are a powerful late night craving trigger for me.

This information is very helpful. My biggest issue is planning sides for dinner without carbs. Do you just do double veggies in place of a baked potato or brown rice?

JulieJ08
06-12-2009, 01:55 PM
This information is very helpful. My biggest issue is planning sides for dinner without carbs. Do you just do double veggies in place of a baked potato or brown rice?

Yup! :)

synger
06-12-2009, 02:25 PM
My biggest issue is planning sides for dinner without carbs. Do you just do double veggies in place of a baked potato or brown rice?

I have found that I can't have grain or potato... but I can tolerate peans and beans as a side dish. They have more carbs than most veggies, but they also have tremendous fiber. So instead of veg and potato, I'll have veg and green peas, or veg and lentil salad, or veg and black beans.

susiemartin
06-12-2009, 05:04 PM
MugCanDoIt-
Funny you should bring carb timing up.

I just came back from the hair salon & was reading an article about Roger Troy Wilson's book - LET'S DO LUNCH - which is the premise of his book.

Supposedly there are some scientific reasons why people who eat the majority of their carbs & biggest meal at lunch lose much more weight than people who eat carbs at night or have a large dinner.

Turns out the body processes carbs differently at different times of the day. Has to do with circadian rhythm. Might want to Google it if you are interested.

MugCanDoIt
06-12-2009, 05:30 PM
MugCanDoIt-
Funny you should bring carb timing up.

I just came back from the hair salon & was reading an article about Roger Troy Wilson's book - LET'S DO LUNCH - which is the premise of his book.

Supposedly there are some scientific reasons why people who eat the majority of their carbs & biggest meal at lunch lose much more weight than people who eat carbs at night or have a large dinner.

Turns out the body processes carbs differently at different times of the day. Has to do with circadian rhythm. Might want to Google it if you are interested.

Hmmm...Ijust might do that, thanks! I think Im gonna stay away from my low carb bread after supper now. I'll just stick to my 3 carb yogurt cups. Gotta do something to speed this process up....Im working my butt off and its going too slowly! :devil:

Stella
06-12-2009, 06:05 PM
I have now imposed a "carb curfew" and it works for me!

I have done so, so many different things to try to lose weight but I never stuck with anything because the cravings just got the better of me! Now I am controlling my blood sugar (which includes carb curfew at night) and I do not crave. I`m finally losing weight!!

The no carb at dinner time helps me in two ways: firstly, all that`s said above about insulin and HGH. But also (and a biggie for me) - it means that I don`t take that first bite of the things which will cause me to binge on them. These are always carby things. I now just don`t have them at night. (During the day I tolerate them better although I try not to have them too often)

It really works for me and I am extatic about having lost 12 lb already!

Stella

looloo86
06-20-2009, 02:25 AM
i haven't tried it but i beleive in calorie counting more .Also i sleep @ 6 a:m so i actually burn it all up before bedtime.i usually dont eat 3 to 5 hours before bedtime.

Stella
06-20-2009, 06:17 AM
i haven't tried it but i beleive in calorie counting more .Also i sleep @ 6 a:m so i actually burn it all up before bedtime.i usually dont eat 3 to 5 hours before bedtime.

Well, yes - no regime in the entire world will work if you eat too many calories...

But I feel that less carbs keep hunger at bay so it helps me not to eat too many calories...

Beverlyjoy
06-20-2009, 08:06 AM
A while ago I asked this question of my friend who is a registered dietician & nutritionist and she said that a calorie is a calorie. She told me that calories in plus movement equals a weight loss, gain, or maintainence. She said when you eat what doesn't matter for weight loss - however, if eating a certain food is a trigger food than it can lead to extra eating. Only you can figure it out for yourself.

She also said that certain people do better with more protein in the morning or evening. She said it doesn't matter for weight loss as much as blood sugar and energy.

Stella
06-20-2009, 04:08 PM
A while ago I asked this question of my friend who is a registered dietician & nutritionist and she said that a calorie is a calorie. She told me that calories in plus movement equals a weight loss, gain, or maintainence. She said when you eat what doesn't matter for weight loss - however, if eating a certain food is a trigger food than it can lead to extra eating. Only you can figure it out for yourself.


I would be in agreement but for me it is that carbs lead me to overeating, particularly the sugary carbs.

Also, a meal of just fish and veg makes me equally as full as a mal of fish, veg and potatoes, which means that I am eating less calories through dropping the carbs.

Stella

kaplods
06-20-2009, 04:41 PM
There is growing research that a calorie isn't always a calorie.

Calories count, but there are an amazing number of factors that can make calories behave differently in the body. The food you eat can affect metabolism directly, or indirectly (as in the case of poor nutrition causing fatigue).

A calorie is a unit of heat, in essence the amount of stored energy in an organic substance. "Burnability," if you will - but our bodies are not furnaces, there's no evidence that the body burns all foods completely or equally well, and in fact a good deal of evidence to the contrary (to be blunt and a bit gross, corn is a perfect example - it comes out the other end with calories still left in it - which is why birds and other animals can gain quite a bit of nutrition from picking through other animals poo - or eating the poo itself).

Cellulose is another example ("fiber"). It has calories (because anything that can be burned has calories), but cellulose is a carbohydrate that humans cannot digest (in fact only termites are born with the ability to digest cellulose, all other critters who eat large amounts of plant material get the ability to digest it by eating their parents poo as babies).

There's also evidence that quality of fule can affect the efficiency of the furnace. Some of these effects are obvious - if you're eating food with little nutritional value, you may experience fatigue, which can not only decrease your energy output because of a resulting lack of energy and strength - but also may reduce the energy burned in nonvoluntary processes also.

Yes, calories in/calories out is the equation - but we don't have control over all of the calorie out portion. It's a black box - and not a consistent or objective one. The calories in can effect the functioning of the calories out.

Ultimately, calories matter, as does where those calories are coming from if you want your furnace(metabolism) to operate at peak efficency.

In keeping food diaries, I find that I do lose more weight on 1800 calories of lower carb foods than 1800 calories on a higher carb diet. Water retention may be one explanation. Energy increases on a lower carb diet may be another.

A bigger effect for me, is the effect of high carb foods on hunger. High carb foods, especially high GI foods, increase hunger to insane proportions. The research so far, seems to support that this effect is most dramatic in people who are obese and/or insulin resistant (it's seen in people who are of average weight if they are insulin resistant or diabetic).

The chemical reaction is farely well understood. Carbohydrates that are easily broken down trigger insulin release. Insulin is a growth hormone and increases the ability/tendency to gain weight, at the very least by triggering appetite. Because the body of insulin resistant folks doesn't use insulin efficiently, it triggers larger spikes of insulin (and hunger) than it would "normal" people.

Since obesity is one of the factors that contributes to insulin resistance, as I lose weight I should become less insulin resistant. It's just another way that becoming obese, makes becoming unobese more difficult. Just as the larger one gets, the more difficult exercise is. Not an "excuse," just a reality that one has to acknowledge and work around.