Weight and Resistance Training - Advice on my routine?




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2fluffy
05-01-2009, 01:36 PM
I may have posted this in the wrong forum. Still finding my way around :)

I met with a personal trainer for the first time in my life. She did a fitness test on me and put together a routine.

My stats: 5'7", 264 lbs (starting weight of 280 lbs)

Day one: 15 minutes of cardio for warm up
Circuit I: Chest press - 50 lbs resistance - 3 sets of 15
abduction/adduction - 70 lb resistance - 3 sets of 15
Biceps curl - 30 lb resistance - 3 sets of 12
Back extension - OBW - 3 sets of 15
Ab Balls - 4 sets of 20
Repeat circuit I x 3

Day 2: 60 minutes of cardio: 15-20 on elliptical
25-35 on treadmill
15 - 20 on stairclimber

Day 3: 6o minutes of cardio (same as above)

Day 4: 15 minute cardio warm up
Circuit II: Overhead press - 50 lb resistance - 3 sets of 15
Lat pull downs - 60 lb resistance - 3 sets of 15
Lat pull down (leaning back) - same as above
Triceps - 80 lb resistance - 3 sets of 15
Rotary torso - 45 lbs resistance - 4 sets of 20
Repeat x 3

Day 5: 60 minutes of cardio

Day 6: 15 minute cardio warm up
Circuit III: Seated pulley rows - 30 lb resistance - 3 sets of 15
Leg press - 150 lb resistance - 3 sets of 15
Glutts - 15 lb resistance - 3 sets of 15
Leg curls - 40 lb resistance - 3 sets of 15
Ab hoist - 40 lbs resistance - 4 sets of 20
Repeat x 3

Day 7: 60 minutes of cardio

I also eat at a 1000 cal/day deficit. I eat around 2000 cals/day in 4-5 small meals, incorporating protein, carbs and fats. I started out at around 1200 cals per day, but was told that that was entirely too low for my size and activity level. Once I increased, I have had better luck.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.


nelie
05-01-2009, 01:41 PM
Well your trainer put you on the plan and normally I'd say trust the trainer. I'm guessing though that most of these exercises are on machines?

If I was working with a trainer, I'd tell her/him that I want to focus on free weights and avoid machines.

Also 60 minutes of cardio, unless you love cardio, seems a bit of overkill. I'd look at High Intensity Interval training (aka HIIT).

Other than using machines, things slightly concerning about your plan are:
1) All reps are fixed
2) All weights are fixed
3) Certain machines I'd skip - Abductor/adductor and rotary torso

Oh and here are some threads to read over on what I based my above comments on:
http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/showthread.php?t=136376
http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/showthread.php?t=60005
http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/showthread.php?t=81247

And here is a website that goes over HIIT
http://bodyforlife.com/exercise/cardiotraining.asp

LandonsBaby
05-01-2009, 01:45 PM
Well your trainer put you on the plan and normally I'd
If I was working with a trainer, I'd tell her/him that I want to focus on free weights and avoid machines.

Also 60 minutes of cardio, unless you love cardio, seems a bit of overkill. I'd look at High Intensity Interval training (aka HIIT).

Other than using machines, things slightly concerning about your plan are:
1) All reps are fixed
2) All weights are fixed
3) Certain machines I'd skip - Abductor/adductor and rotary torso

I agree. Some of the machines are fine but you could do a lot more with free weights if you would like.


kaw
05-01-2009, 02:17 PM
I know I sound like a broken record, but Krista Scott Dixon has a great site for women lifters, beginners and otherwise: www.stumptuous.com. See, in particular, her articles about getting started and about training.

My insta-take on your routine is that it has too much cardio relative to weight training (assuming your goals are to lose fat and at least retain muscle mass). The weight training sessions contain too many isolation exercises that at best are inefficient and at worst don't work.

For example, instead of the abductor/adductor exercise, have your trainer show you how to do squats, even if at first they're assisted or body weight only. This will work more muscle groups (legs, butt, abs, back, and, yes, abductor/adductors), build functional strength that will help you in real life, prevent injuries caused by muscle imbalances, and give you a better metabolic boost than the ab/ad machine can.

Kudos for getting started!

Be strong,
Kim

2fluffy
05-01-2009, 02:36 PM
Well your trainer put you on the plan and normally I'd say trust the trainer. I'm guessing though that most of these exercises are on machines?

If I was working with a trainer, I'd tell her/him that I want to focus on free weights and avoid machines.

Also 60 minutes of cardio, unless you love cardio, seems a bit of overkill. I'd look at High Intensity Interval training (aka HIIT).

Other than using machines, things slightly concerning about your plan are:
1) All reps are fixed
2) All weights are fixed
3) Certain machines I'd skip - Abductor/adductor and rotary torso



Thanks for the response. :) I plan to end up with free weights eventually. I am absolutely the most uncoordinated person you will ever meet. I thought I would start with the machines until I could get to the point that I could find out enough about the free weights to move to those.

I've read a bit about HIIT and I know it's definitely the way to go. I've tried it and I guess I don't have the endurance or strength yet. My knees are really bad, prolly from carrying around all this weight all of my life and I'm hoping that as I improve, I can move to this.

As far as the reps and resistance, I've been increasing that as I can.

I will definitely check out those links. I appreciate it so much. I'll do some research and take up those suggestions. Thanks again :)

I agree. Some of the machines are fine but you could do a lot more with free weights if you would like.

Thanks for your response. I'll definitely try to move more toward the free weights. I just have to figure out how to do it first

I know I sound like a broken record, but Krista Scott Dixon has a great site for women lifters, beginners and otherwise. See, in particular, her articles about getting started and about training.

My insta-take on your routine is that it has too much cardio relative to weight training (assuming your goals are to lose fat and at least retain muscle mass). The weight training sessions contain too many isolation exercises that at best are inefficient and at worst don't work.

For example, instead of the abductor/adductor exercise, have your trainer show you how to do squats, even if at first they're assisted or body weight only. This will work more muscle groups (legs, butt, abs, back, and, yes, abductor/adductors), build functional strength that will help you in real life, prevent injuries caused by muscle imbalances, and give you a better metabolic boost than the ab/ad machine can.

Kudos for getting started!

Be strong,
Kim

I know I'm doing too much cardio. Just like I was eating too little in the beginning. I'm just trying so hard to do this and I have the attitude (even though I know it's wrong) that a little change is good and will give good results so maxing out must be great and give even better results. It's so hard to move myself away from this, even though I know it's right. I finally started eating more (about 2000 cals/day) and am actually doing much better. I was only eating 1200 cals/day when I first started. I just have to make myself do the right thing. That type A personality in me gets me every time!

I had heard that the abduct/adduct machine and rotary torso weren't great so I wanted to get other opinions. I guess that the reasons I do the machines is that I can actually see my progress. Doing squats and lunges are just so hard for me and I guess I'll feel like I'm taking a step backward because I can't do it well.

I'll definitely take your advice into consideration and will most likely start to make some changes into better exercises by incorporating them into my routine until I can wean myself away from the machines.

Thanks for the link too :)

2fluffy
05-01-2009, 03:09 PM
I physically cannot run on the treadmill for more than 30-45 seconds. What do you think about this... If instead of increasing speed on the treadmill, I concentrate more on the incline to increase the intensity? Would that work at all until I get to where I can increase the speed? Or should I just concentrate on getting faster and more fit until I can start to run?

Or what other areas would be good for this method? What about the elliptical? Any suggestions?

nelie
05-01-2009, 05:01 PM
HIIT doesn't mean running. HIIT means varying YOUR intensity. For some people, walking at various speeds/includes can be HIIT. You can also try using the elliptical and bicycle as well for HIIT. I've actually only done HIIT on an elliptical. Personally, you'd have to drag me on a treadmill (although I do walking/running outdoors)

I also have bad knees so I understand. I started with machines and honestly I wish someone had told me from the start to do free weights. You don't have to be incredibly coordinated but it involves multiple muscle groups and you have better control at the angle to decrease your risk of injury. In my opinion, even if you start with NO weights, it is better than starting on a machine. Meaning, learn the form, build up with the weights as you are able. Do squats, do lunges. I know they are hard for you but it gets better over time. Don't expect to be an expert/master at weights from day 1.

2fluffy
05-01-2009, 05:54 PM
Thanks for the information on HIIT. I researched it a little more and I think I'll do it on the elliptical. That doesn't hurt my knees at all. Can I do that alternating with a circuit training program?

The only concern that I had about starting to use free weights is that my weight loss could stall or I could end up losing some muscle in the interim. Any thoughts on this? I plan to use free weights now, espcially after all I've read. I just hate getting discouraged (and I know that stalls in weight loss and occasional gains go along with it). I just cannot give up this time.

nelie
05-01-2009, 06:35 PM
As long as you are following a consistent weight training plan, with weights as heavy as they can be in order to maintain good form along with eating enough calories, you should be able to minimize muscle loss.

Tomato
05-01-2009, 07:26 PM
Hi 2fluffy,

Have ever done any resistance training prior to this? Some of the numbers (in terms of resistance) seem awfully high to me. I am definitely no expert but for example the triceps exercise - EIGHTY pounds??? You didn't say what kind of exercise it is. But if you do 3 set of 15 at eighty pounds, I will wash your feet and drink the water every night. :-)

Jacque9999
05-01-2009, 08:25 PM
Day one: 15 minutes of cardio for warm up
Circuit I: Chest press - 50 lbs resistance - 3 sets of 15
abduction/adduction - 70 lb resistance - 3 sets of 15
Biceps curl - 30 lb resistance - 3 sets of 12
Back extension - OBW - 3 sets of 15
Ab Balls - 4 sets of 20
Repeat circuit I x 3


Day 4: 15 minute cardio warm up
Circuit II: Overhead press - 50 lb resistance - 3 sets of 15
Lat pull downs - 60 lb resistance - 3 sets of 15
Lat pull down (leaning back) - same as above
Triceps - 80 lb resistance - 3 sets of 15
Rotary torso - 45 lbs resistance - 4 sets of 20
Repeat x 3

Day 6: 15 minute cardio warm up
Circuit III: Seated pulley rows - 30 lb resistance - 3 sets of 15
Leg press - 150 lb resistance - 3 sets of 15
Glutts - 15 lb resistance - 3 sets of 15
Leg curls - 40 lb resistance - 3 sets of 15
Ab hoist - 40 lbs resistance - 4 sets of 20
Repeat x 3




Did I read that correctly? You're doing 3 sets of each and then repeating it 3x? How long are you at the gym. Maybe I'm missing something but that seems like a lot to me....:?:

2fluffy
05-01-2009, 08:42 PM
Hi 2fluffy,

Have ever done any resistance training prior to this? Some of the numbers (in terms of resistance) seem awfully high to me. I am definitely no expert but for example the triceps exercise - EIGHTY pounds??? You didn't say what kind of exercise it is. But if you do 3 set of 15 at eighty pounds, I will wash your feet and drink the water every night. :-)

I've never done resistance training before. I went for a fitness test with a personal trainer. She put me through some stuff to find out my max for each machine then gave me a list of what to do each time. I started at 3 sets of 15 with a 70 lb resistance on the triceps machine, but have built up to 80 lbs over 4 weeks. I use a triceps extension machine. Tried to post a pic, but it wouldn't let me yet. I basically sit at the machine, put my arms over this pad, pull up on the handle and extend downward.

Someone told me that the machines help you out some so I probably wouldn't be doing that with free weights. I had no idea how much to lift. I'm just kinda following what she said to do. :shrug:

Did I read that correctly? You're doing 3 sets of each and then repeating it 3x? How long are you at the gym. Maybe I'm missing something but that seems like a lot to me....:?:


I'm usually at the gym around an hour. I spend 15 minutes on each circuit, then repeat it 2 more times. I started out with doing the circuit twice and have worked up to 3 times. The trainer said it was circuit training, but I haven't worked up to doing the cardio between circuits. I just keep my heart rate up as best I can.


I'm pretty motivated and believe in working really hard. I'm drenched in sweat and pumped up and exhausted at the same time after leaving the gym. I honestly came here for help and I really wouldn't benefit at all if I exaggerated about the amount of work I'm doing. That would only hurt me. I'll just do some research on my own. Thanks to everyone that helped me.

Jacque9999
05-01-2009, 08:57 PM
I'm usually at the gym around an hour. I spend 15 minutes on each circuit, then repeat it 2 more times. I started out with doing the circuit twice and have worked up to 3 times. The trainer said it was circuit training, but I haven't worked up to doing the cardio between circuits. I just keep my heart rate up as best I can.

Oh I see, so you are doing all the reps very quickly then, right? I just couldn't imagine doing that many reps/sets at a slower pace which is what I do. Actually I did a full body circuit workout (set up by my trainer) today which took me an hour and a half..I know, I know...it was too long...we will adjust it, but here's how it went:


10 min warm up
alternated between upper and lower body exercises doing 3 set of 15 reps
in between each set, I did cardio for 4 minutes.
I was moving the entire time....I didn't rest much between sets.


The more I read on these boards the more I realize that EVERYONE is different and EVERY trainer is different. I guess what it comes down to is that if it's working for you....do it....it might not work for someone else, but all that matters is that it works for YOU!!!

You were doing circuit training even without the cardio....you were moving and switching things, so IMHO, that is circuit training....Keep it up!!!

Tomato
05-01-2009, 09:44 PM
Hi 2fluffy,

I am terribly sorry if I offended you, please accept my apologies. It is not that I did not believe, I was completely stumped at the # of lbs. The thing is you did not originally say what kind of an exercise it was, and for some reason, what popped into my mind was triceps pull down. Here is a clicky (http://www2.gsu.edu/~wwwfit/tricep1.gif) for a picture.

I have to try the triceps extension machine, if my gym has it. It will be interesting to compare.
Again, I apologize if I offended you - that would be the last thing I'd want to do!

2fluffy
05-01-2009, 10:00 PM
Hi Tomato...

I sent you a PM. I'm sorry if I misunderstood what you were saying. TOM must be sneaking up on me ... lol

LandonsBaby
05-01-2009, 11:06 PM
I believe a tricep extension and a tricep pull down is the same machine, is it not? 80lbs is quite a lot and I think what tomato was saying is that YOU ARE DOING AWESOME. I think I can do 30lbs on the tricep pulley extension thing. I think? You should so totally do free weights. You'll rock.

2fluffy
05-01-2009, 11:24 PM
I don't know for sure if it's the same or not. Someoene told me that the machines helped you out a lot so you can do higher resistance.

I feel really bad about the misunderstanding. I told her that I left another forum because when I asked for advice I got some positive stuff, but then a lot of stuff about me being fat and whatnot...some really bad language attached to it. This one guy even replied to my post with a pic of a whale being harpooned. I guess it made me too sensitive.

I'm really not a bad person, promise! :sorry:

PS...thanks :)

Tomato
05-01-2009, 11:46 PM
LangdonsBaby,
I don't think they are the same.
2fluffly said:

I basically sit at the machine, put my arms over this pad, pull up on the handle and extend downward.

I googled up triceps extension machine and this is what I got: Clicky (http://www.fullfitness.net/routines/machine_triceps_extension.html)
This corresponds to 2fluffy's description.

While triceps pulldown looks like this (http://www2.gsu.edu/~wwwfit/tricep1.gif). Like I said, I have to test how much I can do on the extension machine, to see if it will correspond to the amount of resistance on the pulldown gizmo or if it's different.

I think what tomato was saying is that YOU ARE DOING AWESOME.
Yes, that was exactly what I meant!

2fluffy, thanks for your PM. I am so glad you're ok and that we understand each other! :hug:

2fluffy
05-02-2009, 12:04 AM
Yes...that's the exact machine I'm using. It's really not that difficult to do either. and thanks to you both. :hug:

Here's the new workout I came up with and please feel free to offer suggestions on how to improve them. I'm currently watching videos on form and I have no idea about the resistance. I'll have to figure all that out in the gym I guess.

Day 1:
5-10 minutes of moderate warm up
Barbell curls - 2 sets of 12 reps
Lat pull downs - 2 sets of 12 reps
Ab Balls - 4 sets of 20
Dumbbell Curls (without alternating arms) - 2 sets of 12
One arm rows (each arm) - 2 sets of 12
Concentration curls (each arm) - 2 sets of 12
Repeat x 1
Cool down

Day 2:
HIIT on elliptical
2 minutes of warm up at level 3
30 seconds at level 7 as fast as possible
1 minute at level 5 - moderate pace
Repeat for total of 10-15 minutes (depending on what I can do)
5 minute cooldown

Day 3:
Bench press - 2 sets of 12 reps
Overhead extensions - 2 sets of 12 reps
Front raises - 2 sets of 12 reps
Triceps pushdown - 2 sets of 12 reps
Incline dumbbell flyes - 2 sets of 12 reps
Triceps kickback - 2 sets of 12 reps
Ab Hoist - 4 sets of 20 reps
Repeat x 1
Cool down

Day 4:
HIIT on elliptical as described above

Day 5:
Squats - 1 set of 15
Hamstring curls - 2 sets of 12
Ab balls - 4 sets of 20
Lunges - 2 set of 15 per leg
Leg press - 2 sets of 12
Ab hoist - 4 sets of 20
Repeat x 1
Cool down

Day 6:
HIIT on elliptical

Day 7:
Rest :)

I tried to take everyone's advice. I'm expecting the free weights to be more difficult. I'll increase as I gain strength.

sportmom
05-02-2009, 12:06 AM
OH MY GOODNESS Fluff, that is completely wrong. Even in the testier threads on this forum, I can guarantee that would never happen. And if it did, our moderators would soon come along and clean that up.

I'm in my first year of serious wl, I "played around" with free weights before but wasn't consistent. I remember when the pro's here would talk about switching up the exercises every time they worked out and I was so overwhelmed thinking they had all this stuff in their heads, and I was walking around with a sheet of paper and completely challenged even so. It does get better. You learn your way and gain confidence. You hang out here and learn ALOT, you visit the threads at the top and stumptous too. Just don't stop. I'm glad you're reconsidering the long cardio bc I used to do 45 minutes of that every day too and I really think that way why I could never stick to the program for long - it became overwhelming to think I had to do that forever more.

If you're near a library, check out the Body for Life book - either the original by Bill Phillips or the more recent Champions for Life book (or both). Most of the ladies here follow that basic format for lifting and the eating plan is really good too. It's a real lifestyle transformation and is easy to follow once you read thru it. Don't be shy and jump in on our monthly May thread to give us your daily updates. We share all kinds of stuff - food questions, weight changes, life stuff -- it's fun.

LOL - ETA: My first comment seems really funny under your post - we were posting at the same time. When I said wrong, I was referring to your experience on another forum, not the new routine you just posted!!!! :D

2fluffy
05-02-2009, 12:15 AM
lol...I figured it out as I read more. Thanks for the advice. I think I'll go tomorrow night (there usually isn't anyone in the gym on weekend nights) and try to figure my way around the free weights section. My trainer kept trying to get me to let her show me some things but I was really afraid of it. I'm hoping I'll get it eventually.

The cardio felt great afterward, but someone told me that too much cardio can actually cause weight loss stalls. Not sure if that's true or not, but this HIIT thing seems to be a great idea. Plus I like the idea of getting out of the gym and getting home to my family earlier.

nelie
05-02-2009, 10:41 AM
Fluffy - it is awesome that you are working to find a plan for yourself.

Just to verify, the front raises are where your arms are always kept straight and raised in front of of you?

On your day 1, it appears you are doing 3 bicep curl variations? I'd probably cut that down to 2.

It also looks like you are going to ease in to squats, I'd probably say try to do 2 sets. Also, I'd look at deadlifts versus doing hamstring curls. I say this as my hamstrings are sore today from deadlifts :)

I'd also recommend watching some videos on squats and lunges to just get an idea. Although many of the squat/lunges videos show a lot of depth, remember only go as deep as you feel comfortable. I also forgot one thing you can do is do squats against a ball against a wall. It is a bit more gentle on the knees. I do both those and regular squats.

Here is a video demo on squats that seems pretty good
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDdSZmWNYQI

This is without weight but as you improve, you can add dumbbells on the side or a barbell on the shoulder.

sacha
05-02-2009, 10:42 AM
Seems fine to start but you seem like a strong girl (yay!) and I'd recommend slowly moving towards full-body movements (ie. pushups, burpees, snatches, etc) eventually. I'm not sure what is the purpose of having multiple tricep workouts but little lower body (hardly any squats?). I'm biased though, I don't believe in exercises that work little body parts :( For example, proper chin ups and pull ups will provide a decent ab workout.

nelie
05-02-2009, 10:45 AM
Sacha - good point, I forgot to mention pushups.

Pushups can be intimidating but they don't need to be. Pushups on a bench (or wall or countertop) can be a good transitional learning place for pushups. At home, I do pushups on my steps as I can only do a few pushups on the floor.

sacha
05-02-2009, 10:51 AM
LOL, we posted at the same time and pretty much said the same thing. I didn't even realize that.

Yes, pushups can start on the wall, to the countertop, to on your knees, then to the floor (and then if you are so inclined - one arm, military style, etc). Heck I started on the wall years ago and now I can pump out 30-40 on the floor. Work your way up! :)

Whatever OP chooses to do, I think it is important to progress into full-body movements, perhaps in a year or so. I'm anti-machine and anti-isolation exercises in general though so I'll hold my tongue any further!!!

Jacque9999
05-02-2009, 12:27 PM
Yes, pushups can start on the wall, to the countertop, to on your knees, then to the floor (and then if you are so inclined - one arm, military style, etc). Heck I started on the wall years ago and now I can pump out 30-40 on the floor. Work your way up! :)

I never liked pushups, plus I have weak wrists, however we do them in pilates...at least I know when we get to that exercise, the class is almost over!!!!:p

So these are great ideas to do when I feel like I should do pushups but don't want to do floor ones....thanks for the ideas.

2fluffy
05-02-2009, 09:05 PM
Fluffy - it is awesome that you are working to find a plan for yourself.

Just to verify, the front raises are where your arms are always kept straight and raised in front of of you?

On your day 1, it appears you are doing 3 bicep curl variations? I'd probably cut that down to 2.

It also looks like you are going to ease in to squats, I'd probably say try to do 2 sets. Also, I'd look at deadlifts versus doing hamstring curls. I say this as my hamstrings are sore today from deadlifts :)

I'd also recommend watching some videos on squats and lunges to just get an idea. Although many of the squat/lunges videos show a lot of depth, remember only go as deep as you feel comfortable. I also forgot one thing you can do is do squats against a ball against a wall. It is a bit more gentle on the knees. I do both those and regular squats.


This is without weight but as you improve, you can add dumbbells on the side or a barbell on the shoulder.

The front arm raises are those where you keep your arms straight out in front, with a dumbbell.

I looked online at articles from various personal trainers and this is one I found with free weights. I can take off some of the biceps work. I can also add some more squats in. I didn't realize I could do them with an exercise ball. I think that I could do it better that way in the beginning. The video I watched was this woman with a barbell over the back of her shoulders with weights on it. I didn't think I would be able to do many of these in the beginning....lol

Also, thanks for the advice on deadlifts. I'll look into some more routines. that one certainly isn't set in stone. I'm going tonight to do my first HIIT routine and thought I would familiarize myself with the free weight section of the gym.

Seems fine to start but you seem like a strong girl (yay!) and I'd recommend slowly moving towards full-body movements (ie. pushups, burpees, snatches, etc) eventually. I'm not sure what is the purpose of having multiple tricep workouts but little lower body (hardly any squats?). I'm biased though, I don't believe in exercises that work little body parts :( For example, proper chin ups and pull ups will provide a decent ab workout.

I found a routine with those exact exercises (though I'm not sure what some of them are...lol) And I'd really like to get into that as I build strength.

The routine I found is one from an online circuit training routine with free weights. It had even more triceps workouts, but I omitted those as I felt that it was too much in that area. My arms are HUGE...way too much excess fat. And I know you can't spot reduce, but I guess I was trying to...lol

Sacha - good point, I forgot to mention pushups.

Pushups can be intimidating but they don't need to be. Pushups on a bench (or wall or countertop) can be a good transitional learning place for pushups. At home, I do pushups on my steps as I can only do a few pushups on the floor.

Pushups are scary for sure. I can start with them against a wall and work my way up. I'm willing to try anything. I'm also terrified of chin-ups. I have very little upper body strength and a lot of body to lift up. But if that's a weakness, it's probably what I need to work on the most.

I'm going to do more research. Basic plan is to do this:

Day 1: work biceps, lats, and abs
Day 2: HIIT
Day 3: chest, triceps, shoulders, abs
Day 4: HIIT
Day 5: quads, lower back, hamstrings, abs, calves
Day 6: HIIT
Day 7: rest

Does that sound ok?

nelie
05-02-2009, 09:53 PM
Oh I wouldn't worry about chinups yet. It requires weight loss and upper body strength. I think lat pull downs (and assisted pullups) are good options until you get to that point. It is one of the exceptions where I would say machine is good. Also, if you have a choice of a machine with cable (where you can move the bar freely) versus a machine that is static, go for cable.

The good shoulder raise is the one with your arms straight. The one where you bend your arms and bring your arms up along your body are bad (in terms of injury risk) which is why I wanted to verify which one you were doing. The one you picked is good in other words :)

2fluffy
05-02-2009, 10:20 PM
k good. Thanks for your input. :) I'm probably going to do some more research until I get a good routine. I guess I could just stick to the machines until I figure it out. That would be better than nothing at all, right? I'll post something when I get it figured out to the best of my ability....lol

WaterRat
05-05-2009, 11:29 PM
Pushups are scary for sure. I can start with them against a wall and work my way up.

Um, that would be work your way down! :rofl:

Welcome! It sounds like you're getting great advice here, and doing well with your workouts too.

2fluffy
05-07-2009, 12:37 AM
...lol ... too funny!

Thanks so much.

I still haven't found a good circuit training routine for free weights. I've decided that I'm going to stick with the machines until I find one. In the mean time, I'm going to start doing a basic routine with free weights one day a week until I get more comfortable. I'm worried about trying to get through my circuits quickly and hurting myself. I'm going to just try adjusting and moving into the free weight transition slowly.

SBD Sass
05-07-2009, 12:52 AM
didn't mean to post in this one...sorry