Weight and Resistance Training - when do i start resistance training?




katiejames
01-03-2009, 11:08 AM
i want to work on losing poundage before lifting weight to tone up.. but when do i start that? once i reach my goal weight? or right away?:?:


Meg
01-03-2009, 11:17 AM
Right away! Ideally you should start on the first day of your diet/lifestyle change. Check out this thread for a great discussion of the issue:

Is lifting weights the way to go when your trying to shed pounds? (http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/showthread.php?t=156307)

junebug41
01-03-2009, 12:13 PM
Why wait? Building muscle burns fat AND calories and builds endurance. :?:

Ditto to the thread Meg posted, too :)


PhotoChick
01-03-2009, 12:17 PM
Heheheheh.

Rather than go into my usual rant, I'll just say, read the thread Meg posted and START NOW. ;)

.

midwife
01-03-2009, 12:24 PM
:lol: I was going to write my "weight lifting changed my life" spiel again, but it is in the linked thread.

junebug41
01-03-2009, 12:28 PM
:lol: I was going to write my "weight lifting changed my life" spiel again, but it is in the linked thread.

Heheheheh.

Rather than go into my usual rant, I'll just say, read the thread Meg posted and START NOW. ;)

.


Fine. Be difficult. Make me dig. :p

PhotoChick
01-03-2009, 12:35 PM
Hee hee June! You really don't want me to go into my "toning" rant on such a peaceful Saturday afternoon. :)

The short version is that toning (in the way most people us it) is a myth. You lift weights to build muscle. Building muscle builds strength and increases metabolism. Muscle is denser than fat, so weight for weight, an equal amount of muscle takes up much less room. And muscle looks damn good on women. Oh, and no, women won't bulk like men ... we don't have enough testosterone in our bodies to do so. It takes serious effort and diet to bulk like female weight lifters do.

And yeah, like midwife, weight lifting changed my life!

>

Meg
01-03-2009, 01:31 PM
Add me to the "weightlifting changed my life" club too. :)

A few years ago, we had a Men's Forum here at 3FC and I saved a post that I wrote there in response to a question that I don't even remember ... but I saved it because it came straight from my heart and I didn't want to lose the words once they were down on paper. The Men's Forum is gone and so is my original post but here's my story of how a sedentary woman (we're talking couch potato) who had been overweight or obese her whole life learned to love weightlifting:

*****

When I walked into a gym for the first time in my life at age 46 and 257 pounds, I was beaten down by all my years of failing at weight loss. I never gave up trying but each failure was killing my spirit a little further. Realizing that I was beyond clueless at what to do in the gym, I was fortunate enough to meet a personal trainer who taught me everything that I know today about nutrition, cardio, and lifting weights. But the true gift that he gave me — by teaching me how to lift weights — was the knowledge that I had the strength within me to succeed at weight loss.

What’s the connection between lifting weights and losing weight (besides building muscle)? You see, I always thought that I was a wimp — that I was physically and psychologically weak and weak-willed (after all, I was fat, wasn’t I?) Weightlifting showed me that I was physically strong (when you’ve been obese for most of your life, you build some strong bones and muscles by just hauling yourself around!) As I kept working in the gym, it was so cool to have baby muscles start sprouting under all the fat — I’d lie in bed at night and feel at these strange changes in my body (and it was fun to discover bones too — ribs! collarbones! hipbones! ). And it’s a cliché, I know, but being strong is a very empowering feeling.

But far more important than the physical changes, weightlifting showed me that I was mentally tough and could persevere. That I could pick a goal and achieve it. That I could push myself far, far harder than I ever had imagined. That I was capable of so much more than I thought. That I could push through discomfort and even pain and end up floating high as a kite on the other side. It’s hard to put the feeling into words but it’s the best feeling in the world. And I’ll bet any of you who lift weights know exactly what I mean.

I guess the bottom line is that I learned that the power to change my life lies within me. I had the strength to do what it took to lose the weight all along, though I didn’t realize it. Most of weight loss is head stuff, not the nuts and bolts of what to eat etc. You have to believe that you can do it — that you're the one making the decisions and choices. Weightlifting has shown me that I don’t have to take the easy road that most of the world does — it’s so much more rewarding to be physically and mentally strong.

And that’s why I’m the goofy 49-year old mom in the gym with dumbbells in her hands and a big old smile on her face.

*****

Every word of it is still true today -- except I'm 54 now! :fr:

katiejames
01-03-2009, 03:36 PM
i understand that most of you who have been on this site for awhile see many of the same questions but it is much appreciated that i am not responded to rudely or in a coy manner. i just started this site a week ago and already i have a bunch of you bashing this question.. the link you sent me was from november so how was i to know that it was there.. please try to be nicer to new members instead of assuming that new members have no brains at all.. thank you

Meg
01-03-2009, 03:40 PM
Katie, sweetie, no one's bashing you for asking your question! :hug: It's a good question and I thought you might find it worthwhile to check out a recent thread for some discussion and opinions. Really, it's standard to refer members to other threads on topic and not an insult at all. :)

katiejames
01-03-2009, 03:46 PM
i am a super easy going person and i understand that the same question gets asked over and over again. i am here for support and advice and it is ok to refer me to another link. i guess i am just a lil sensitive thats all... its just the responses made me feel as if i was asking a dumb question and i should have looked for this question.

Meg
01-03-2009, 03:49 PM
I'm so sorry if we gave you that impression! Trust me, no one expects you to dredge up old threads -- I just happened to remember that one since it's so near and dear to my heart. :D Please stick around and I think you'll find this to be one of the most supportive groups at 3FC. :hug:

junebug41
01-03-2009, 03:52 PM
i am a super easy going person and i understand that the same question gets asked over and over again. i am here for support and advice and it is ok to refer me to another link. i guess i am just a lil sensitive thats all... its just the responses made me feel as if i was asking a dumb question and i should have looked for this question.

It wasn't my intention to "bash" you and don't think I was.. I was legitimately curious about why you wanted to wait to start lifting.

ETA: Meg is right- referring people to existing conversations can help explain or illustrate something better than a single post. Common practice :) I'm sorry if I came off as coy!

katiejames
01-03-2009, 03:54 PM
i didnt know when to start that is why i asked.. i was always under the impression that muscle weighs more than fat and all that good mumbo jumbo and also that i will get all ripped like a man if i start... i also dont know which weights i am supposed to start with. what about crunches? do those work too? idk that part i am grey about...

WaterRat
01-03-2009, 04:09 PM
Okay, one of the reasons we often refer folks is that there is good information there, and maybe when you ask everyone who had good advice then isn't available right now, etc. On that note, I'll refer you to the stickied threads at the top of this forum for hints on getting started with weight lifting.

As for crunches, they can be one part of a routine. Crunches alone won't do much. You'll build some abdominal muscle, but that's all. Weight loss requires cardio to speed it along, and weight lifting to help build muscle which is more metabolically active than fat (that is, it burns calories). But, exercise is not enough. Most of your weight loss will require a good food plan. THose things together will add up to weight loss. :) Stick around, read some old threads, and you'll find lots of help here. The fact that it's a holiday weekend is also a reason there's not all of us around.

midwife
01-03-2009, 04:14 PM
Sorry, we were being a little silly. I didn't mean to make you feel bad. The thread Meg pulled up is actually a really good one. As for where to start, there is a good book called New Rules of Weightlifting for Women and the author talks about weightlifting principles & nutrition and there is a pretty good plan to start. I would recommend a few sessions with a personal trainer if you can swing it. Stumptuous.com is a good site to get some ideas. Also feel free to join in on our monthly chat thread. I read about new exercises on there all the time.

katiejames
01-03-2009, 04:20 PM
i did read the thread and it helped answer my questions.... and i just may have to snag the book you are talking about too!

jamsk8r
01-03-2009, 04:21 PM
Start now. You can't get ripped like a man unless you take steroids and spend a few bazillion hours in the gym. If you belong to a gym, they probably have an orientation of some sort to get you started in the weight room, so that's a good place to start, or you can hire a personal trainer who can show you what to do and get you started. There are also books like Body for Life or New Rules of Lifting for Women, that you can borrow from your local library, that give a great beginner intro to lifting. :)

nil
01-04-2009, 10:29 PM
I agree with jamsk8r, you would have an amazingly hard time getting "ripped like a man" even if you wanted to. Going to a gym where they have trainers to help you develop a workout might be a good idea, or hiring someone just to get you started.

Figuring out which exercises to do and how to do them is the hardest part, but once you have that you can just do the same thing every week. I like exrx.net, they have some instructions for developing a weight training workout (exrx.net/WeightTraining/Instructions.html) but it might be a bit on the technical side and a book or trainer would be easier. exrx is a good reference in any case.

Of course, you should do cardio at the same time for greater weight loss.

AppleOnYa76
01-05-2009, 01:43 AM
I used the Body for Life book (the first one, not the one for women) and weight lifting (and eating) plan when I lost weight after my first pregnancy... It was so awesome to have that resource because it really helped me see past the myths of weightlifting for women. I lifted hard with the goal of building serious muscles, and I can honestly say that I never was near the risk of being to bulky. I looked really, really fit and sleek.

Muscle does not weigh more than fat (because as you will see said here over and over, a pound is a pound is a pound), but a pound of muscles is much smaller visually and takes up less space than a pound of fat. So when people say that muscles weighs more than fat, they mean a chunch of muscle tissue weighs more than the same area of a chunch fat tissue. That is why someone can be 5'5", 150 pounds, and wearing a size 5 and someone else can be the same height, 130 pounds, and barely squeezing into a size 5... The first person has more muscle tissue, which (pound for pound) takes up less space on their body than fat.

Anyways... Sorry to ramble! I am new here as well, but not new to weight-lifting. I am planning to buy the New Rules book because I have heard great things about it.

Schumeany
01-05-2009, 03:11 AM
So prior to having three little munchkins who always seem to NEED something ;), I was this same size for a number of years...and I maintained it with a mix of calorie counting, cardio and strength training at the gym -- a mix of machines, free weights and some "body weight" type exercises like crunches. I spent a good hour at the gym doing the strength training every other day, but I NEVER bulked up. I was just trim and fit looking.

This time during my weight loss, while I wanted to go to the gym, I couldn't figure out how to swing it with my schedule, but I knew that I wanted strength training to be part of my routine. What I did was go buy some resistance bands at a fitness store -- the kind with handles and a door attachment. At first I was skeptical that big rubber bands would do the trick, but I searched the web for some exercise routines using the bands and I read the suggested exercises that came with them...and I started using them as soon as I started my weight loss journey back last summer -- as well as some other "body weight" exercises like leg lifts, lunges, crunches, bicycle crunches and wall push-ups (Now regular push-ups as I am in better shape than I was...). I have to say that the resistance bands work INCREDIBLY well. I would put my body now, at 37 and eight years after my first child was born, up against my former body, in my late twenties, any day (Oh, except my poor boobs...nursing and weight gain has taken a toll there...but resistance training can't do much to fix that problem so I am VERY grateful to Victoria's Secret. :D).

This afternoon my sweet husband was kind of leering at me as I got out of the shower following my cardio...and he asked me to flex my back muscles...so I did. He said, and I quote, "Wow, you are so hot." Eloquent, isn't he? :) But I am kind of proud of my muscle "tone"--which is really just a way of saying my "girl muscles" cause we don't grow the man version without some seriously insane working out, and I can assure you that I am ABSOLUTELY not "ripped like a man". My arms have "definition" and so do my legs and my abdomen, but it is not bulky. On most women, muscle translates as "lean and sexy"...um, if I do say so myself. ;)

Anyway, this rambling post was my round about way of saying...start now. It doesn't have to be a gym. My strength training isn't in a gym -- but I have also done that too and it works great as well.

Oh, a short illustration...my sister and I are the exact same height and I out-weigh her by around 8 pounds. However, we WEAR the same size and our measurements are identical to within 1/2 an inch, and I get to eat more than she does because my lean muscle mass burns more calories. The difference is that while she is a biker and a runner, she doesn't strength train.

If you do it, you will most likely lose weight more steadily as you ramp up your metabolism, and you will start to "look different" at a higher weight. Besides, it makes you feel great -- strong and full of energy.

AppleOnYa76
01-05-2009, 03:33 AM
That was a great post Schumeany... You reminded me of the importance of maintaining (or building) a healthy metabolism. The health and wellness center near my work has this fancy machine that calculated my exact metabolic rate after I breathed into a long tube attached to the machine. After 10 minutes, I knew exactly (not estimated) how much my body burns at rest. I was surprised to learn that my RMR (resting metabolic rate) was 2 deviations below the norm (though still within in the range of normal). I am excited to go back this summer and see if I have increased it by working out and weight training.

For anyone who is doubting weight training, my suggestion is to find a place that has a RMR machine so that you know where you stand in regards to metabolism. Seeing my rate below the norm reminded me that weight training is something I will have to do in order to see optimal results with weight loss and body shape. I do not just want to get smaller and stay the same shape... I want improve my metabolism and build beautiful muscles.

nil
01-05-2009, 03:38 AM
Muscle "weighs more" than fat because it has a higher density, for a given volume, say 1 cubic cm, the cubic cm of muscle weighs about 1.1g while the fat weighs 0.9g. For 20lbs, the difference in volume is slightly less than 2 quarts (rough estimate).

sacha
01-05-2009, 09:32 AM
Start now with whatever you can. Years ago, I couldn't do a 5lb shoulder press without major soreness. Now I am doing 50lbs+ (yeeeears later, of course). It CAN be done!