General Diet Plans and Questions - Oprah struggling with weight




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TinaNina
12-12-2008, 06:58 PM
WHy is it that a woman like Oprah that can afford a trainer and a great chef still can't drop a few lbs? SHe has been struggling her entire life with her weight even though she has all the tools in the world to lose weight. Does that mean the rest of us are hopeless???


choirgirlhotel
12-12-2008, 07:01 PM
WHy is it that a woman like Oprah that can afford a trainer and a great chef still can't drop a few lbs? SHe has been struggling her entire life with her weight even though she has all the tools in the world to lose weight. Does that mean the rest of us are hopeless???

yeah, that totally puzzles me too.

No, it doesn't mean the rest of us don't have hope - it just means she doesn't want it as much as we do.

~CGH~

tater tash
12-12-2008, 07:23 PM
Just because you can afford a personal trainer, doesnt mean you have the will to use them. Celebrities seem to be more about eating out than having a chef prepare each meal for them. Oprahs weight struggle shouldnt be a big deal.. she isnt using what she has for her advantage. Some people just dont have the will it takes to stay with their trainers and utilize their chefs. Even if they did.. they can spoil it other ways with snacking and etc.

I agree that she just doesnt want is as much. Overweight or not, she can achieve what she wants.


kaplods
12-12-2008, 07:52 PM
I think we shouldn't throw around words that judge how much any of us want it. The truth is weight loss is very difficult, especially if you're trying to have any kind of life while doing so. I've struggled with my weight since kindergarten, and sometimes I wanted it so badly that if I could have gotten it by killing someone I probably would have (and some of the things I did to try to lose it, could have killed me).

All of my life, the only way I was able to lose weight successfully (until very recently), was to make weight loss my top priority and nearly my sole priority - over God, over my family, over my career, my friends, any semblence of a social life.

About a year ago I discovered that eliminating sugar and most carbs makes it possible for me to lose weight without weight loss being the only thing in my life. I can have weight loss AND a life - and it's a good thing too, because I spent so much of my life giving up things in order to lose weight, that there's precious little I'm willing to sacrifice on the alter of weight loss.

There's no surprise as to why weight loss is difficult. Our environment and our bodies are at odds. Traits and tendencies that kept our ancestors alive are killing us. For millenia we had to work very hard for our food, and food was scarce, so being hungry and having a preference for fatty and sweet foods had survival value (fat and sugars being preciously rare commodities in a natural world).

We've turned the world topsy turvy where idle time actually increases the odds of weight loss, rather than weight gain. Plenty of celebrities (especially those who are not working for a living) seem to have the time (and make use of it) to do little, but work on their physical appearance. And Oprah certainly has the money to do that too, but she has other goals and projects in life too (which is certainly not a bad thing).

She's juggling, just like the rest of us. And while she's got more resources than most of us, she's also juggling more than many of us would wish to. But regardless of what you're juggling, whenever you juggle, there's always a chance of dropping the ball. And whether you're juggling all of the components of a commercial and philanthropic empire, or an every day life with a job and family, or mental or physical health issues, it's not just possible to drop a ball, it's almost inevitable.

The real test is how long it takes you to pick up the ball and keep juggling.

rubbytummy
12-12-2008, 09:03 PM
Amen, kaplods.

It makes me sad when people are critical of women who are having a publically hard time with weight loss (and Oprah tends to be the go-to example): who are we to judge whether she lacks the desire or she's lazy or whatever? Weight loss isn't a zero-sum game -- talking about how someone else can't do it won't help any of us succeed. What will help is looking at people who are doing it on their own (there are so many incredible examples right here on 3fc!) and taking inspiration from them.

murphmitch
12-12-2008, 09:23 PM
Maybe she doesn't get all the support that we get from 3FC. She may have a lot of people/things that work against weight loss as well. Probably a lot of stress in her life as well.

Thighs Be Gone
12-12-2008, 09:27 PM
I would say it's not at the top (or even the in the tops) of her priorities.

Hey and for what it's worth--I don't think 200 pounds on a person of her height and stature is all that bad.

CountingDown
12-12-2008, 10:17 PM
I imagine that running her media empire, taping her show, being politically active, volunteering and working with charities, family and friends all take a huge amount of commitment, energy and time. I am amazed that she has done as well as she has, and that she continues to be open and honest about her struggle.

I for one can empathize. It has taken me almost my whole life to find the right combination of exercise, diet, and spiritual focus to lose the weight for good. And - I'm older than she is by quite a bit.

Until I have walked in another person's shoes, I could never presume to know what they are going through or how much time and effort they put into weight management.

I wish her well on her journey - hopefully she WILL find the right plan this time. She will be in my prayers.

K8-EEE
12-13-2008, 12:36 AM
Hey, I totally understand it. If it was just an issue of affordability only poor people would have weight problems. Everyone else would just write a check.

How many people here have "been able to afford" Jenny Craig or Weight Watchers or joining Bally's....why don't they have 100% success based on having the money to do these things?

Bottom line Oprah is a human being and struggles with comfort/stress eating and other weight-related issues as I do.

Money and fame doesn't save you from that, or drug addiction, alcoholism, divorce, sickness.....you still struggle with everything except being broke!

luckymommy
12-13-2008, 12:45 AM
She has a food addiction and I can relate. It's pscychological and has more to do with having your mind set a certain way than the resources. Sure, the resources can help...a lot...but that's more in the short term. In the long term, it takes a huge effort to overcome a food addiction. I'm not sure if I put this right and I don't mean to be controversial, since things can come out in the wrong tone. It's just how I feel, that's all. :)

kaplods
12-13-2008, 02:52 AM
Sometimes the concept of a food addiction makes sense to me, and other times I think it's a crock. What I mean, is that food addiction makes it sound like people with weight problems have serious mental problems or at least a bit of a screw loose.

In once sense all humans are food addicted - at least food dependent. So what's wrong with us fat ones? I think for years we've been sold a bill of goods. We're told we're the crazy, malajusted ones who must have deep (or at least persistent) mental deffects or defects of character.

More and more of the USA is becoming overweight - are we getting crazier as a nation, or is it the environment rather than people who are changing?

The researchers are finding more genes linked to obesity - and I don't mean that absolves folks of personal responsibility - but it does make me thing it's not the food addicts that are the deffective ones. Rather, we may have inherited traits that would have kept our ancestors alive, and are working against us in the modern world, where food (especially high fat/sugar foods that would never occur in nature) is overly abundant, and physical exertion is less and less necessary - in fact as jobs get more sedentary, we're doing less and less. The harder you work, the less time you have to do physical work - and the more stress hormones you produce, the less sleep you get - well those might make it even worse.

I don't think we're crazy or defective, or immoral. I think we have bodies and brains that are suited for the stone age, where food is scarce and high calorie, but nutritionally empty foods are non-existant. And where sedentary means dead (either because you didn't work hard enough to obtain food, or you didn't run fast enough to avoid predators).

It takes a lot of effort to overcome the very artificial environment we've created, and I'm not sure that money is an easy answer to the problem. Part of the problem, even amongst the poorest in the US (which are wealthy by many countries' standards), is the easy access to "on demand" high calorie eating. There are many ready-to-eat options, and being wealthy, just means there are more options.

I think that as long as overweight folks are looked at as abnormal or crazy, I don't think the problem will be easily addressed. With half of the US overweight, it's time to realize we've got to start working on not just changing the people, but changing the environment also, or we could end up with a country in which being at a healthy weight is abnormal.

rockinrobin
12-13-2008, 10:12 AM
kaplods wrote:
I think that as long as overweight folks are looked at as abnormal or crazy, I don't think the problem will be easily addressed. With half of the US overweight, it's time to realize we've got to start working on not just changing the people, but changing the environment also, or we could end up with a country in which being at a healthy weight is abnormal.

Overweight folks looked at as abnormal or crazy? Nah. It's practically the norm. Anyone who's struggled (and that would be a LOT of people, L-rd knows myself included) with their weight knows just how difficult a task it is.

I don't think we can count on the government or anyone else to "fix" the problem. That is something we all have to take into our own hands.
We need to create our own "environments" and not leave it up to anyone else. Leaving it up to someone else is a scary thought. Being healthy is one of the most important things there is and quite frankly, I wouldn't dream of leaving something so important up to anyone but ME. Each and every one of us has to take responsiblity for our own health, because ulitmately WE ARE responsible for us and no one can take better care of us, then - us.

We had a whole discussion about this over at the 100lb club. Come take a look:

http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/showthread.php?t=158193

Without a doubt losing/maintaining weight has got to be one of the hardest things in the world.

But it's something that IS doable. I know for me it couldn't occur until I was ready to make it a tippy top priority and now keep it a tippy top priority. Maintaining my weight is one of the very most important things in my life and I've no doubt that I will always have to keep it extra high on my list of priorities. I need to be focused on it. I am a complusive overeater, it is my condition. Though it can never be cured, it can be controlled and managed (though difficult) and I need to be the one to control it. No one else can do it for me.

I know, as I'm sure most of us here do, just how hard it is and I sympathize with Oprah big time. But as we all know, no amount of money, having all the right tools on hand - trainers and gourmet chefs - won't keep the weight off. She may have the right tools and all, but she is the one who has to do ALL the work ALL the time.

LisaF brought up a great point in the thread that I pointed out to you. Something to the affect of - Maybe having those chefs and trainers doesn't give her ENOUGH of a responsiblity. Who knows?

Thighs Be Gone
12-13-2008, 10:41 AM
With half of the US overweight, it's time to realize we've got to start working on not just changing the people, but changing the environment also, or we could end up with a country in which being at a healthy weight is abnormal.




Yes, absolutely. The health of many are at stake here. Obesity is more than a problem, I would say it is a crisis for the toll it is taking on the country in general. The financial costs of the problem is only the tip of the iceberg.

I just watched the movie Wall-E last evening. I have to say the scooter people hit home for many people in the U.S.

rockinrobin
12-13-2008, 11:07 AM
Yes, absolutely. The health of many are at stake here. Obesity is more than a problem, I would say it is a crisis for the toll it is taking on the country in general. The financial costs of the problem is only the tip of the iceberg.
.

I definitely, DEFINITELY agree that obesity in the United States is at crisis levels. In fact I read somewhere recently that more people die in the US from being overfed then underfed. Sooo frightening. And something SHOULD be done about it. But again, we can not wait for the government to do something. We have got to take matters into our hands. There is just too much at stake if we don't.

bargoo
12-13-2008, 11:31 AM
Despite her money and fame. Oprah is human, after all. I know that many of us have been on the lose, regain, lose, regain cycle .It is a struggle to lose and maintain that loss. I can't say that I am a big fan of but Oprah but I understand completely what she is going through. Been there myself and I wish her success just as I would for anyone on these forums.

kaplods
12-13-2008, 12:40 PM
...... we can not wait for the government to do something. We have got to take matters into our hands. There is just too much at stake if we don't.

This is exactly, my point. I never once mentioned the government in my statements that environment needs to change (Besides which, in a democratic system of government, WE are ultimately the government).

WE need to change the environment, for ourselves, on an individual level, but we also need to make changes in our society (one person and one family at a time if necessary).

We can't "make" restaurants offer healthy choices that no one buys - but voting with our dollars to support restaurants that do offer healthy choices is one small step.

In fact, in a capitalist society, voting with our dollars, is probably one of the best agents of change. And in some small ways, we are seeing some positive changes (though the landslide of negative habits are increasing as well). I remember when the only apples that were available year round were Red and Yellow Delicious, and occasionally Granny Smith and MacIntosh.

Eating wholesome food is a lot more acceptable today than it was 20 years ago, where anyone who spurned packaged and boxed foods was "a health nut."

JackieRn
12-13-2008, 04:25 PM
This issue so challenging to resolve. When you look at groups most disproportionately affected by obesity and related health problems the poor and uneducated far outnumber the middle class, wealthy, and educated. Tackling the issue of obesity involves addressing the various inequities that abound in our society, especially those centered around education, the distribution of resources, and access to quality healthcare. While individuals certainly have a role to play in this I don't think the role that government can play in helping those less fortunate should be minimized.

kaplods
12-13-2008, 07:23 PM
True enough, there are many governmental programs that are currently throwing money at problems that probably would be cheaper to address at the prevention levels.

JackieRn
12-13-2008, 07:50 PM
True enough, there are many governmental programs that are currently throwing money at problems that probably would be cheaper to address at the prevention levels.

Unfortunately, I've worked on some of those well intentioned prevention programs that fail because the participants never learned to read at a level adequate enough to use the written resources we provide or don't have the transportation, childcare, etc. to attend educational sessions or financial resources to implement the changes we suggest. Ultimately, without comprehensive systematic change narrowly targeted interventions are doomed to fail.

tammay
12-13-2008, 09:02 PM
I did see the story on Yahoo! News today and it broke my heart :(. I think most of us have struggled with weight issues forever and we know that having the tools is not the issue - even without personal trainers, cooks, etc., we all know what we need to do - it's doing it for the long haul that's the problem. Food is a psychological issue, even if you're not an emotional eater. I personally think that the whole "if she has a trainer/cook/etc., why can't she lose weight?" attitude is akin to thin people looking at those who are overweight and saying, "why don't they just eat less and move more?" We all know that's not the issue - there's a whole lot more going on.

I don't judge her (or try not to) - I admire Oprah for taking a stand to say what we all know - losing weight is a tough thing to do and keeping it off long term is even tougher.

I'm anxious to see what she'll do about being healthier, whether she loses pounds or not...

Tam

kaplods
12-14-2008, 12:21 AM
I think what's getting lost in the shuffle, is that Oprah is still a success story in terms of weight loss, in that she is not waiting until she is heavier than her starting weight to get back on track. She's regained about 50 lbs, but she's still maintaining about a 40 lb loss.

I think it's unrealistic and extremely rare for a person to lose weight once and only once. More often a struggle means a life long struggle and any period of inattention, whether from stress or just shifting priorities is going to result in backsliding.

I don't think that 40 lbs from goal weight is most folks idea of an area of acceptable leeway (although I certainly would jump at those numbers if I could), but it doesn't diminish the accomplishment of catching oneself before the situation is worse than the starting point.

I think it really shows us what kind of vigilance is required to reach and maintain goal weight. I may have to step on a scale once a day for the rest of my life, and I'm ok with that. I no longer let the number tell me who I AM, or how "good" I am, it just tells me what I weigh. It's like brushing my teeth. Or a better analogy is like shaving my under arms. Every morning, I look under my arms and decide whether or not I need to shave. I'm not good or bad depending on whether or not I let the hair continue growing for another day, but for hygienic and asthetic reasons I don't let the hair growth get too out of hand (and even if I do, I don't use it as a reason to put off shaving even further, and definitely not a reason to quit shaving altogether).

I really think we will have more success with weight loss when we stop assigning so much "meaning" to eating and to being overweight. Just take care of yourself. It's a simple concept, and yet so hard to manage. I mean no one forgets to brush their teeth and then decides they're such a failure for having done so that they're never going to brush their teeth again, and they might as well eat nothing but gum drops and let their teeth rot out, while they're at it. Or hey, maybe it's better to pull all their teeth so they never have to brush them ever again.

I guess it would still be "news" if we learned that Oprah never brushed her teeth - but it just doesn't have the same wallop as weight gain.

JackieRn
12-14-2008, 08:24 AM
From the standpoint of weight lost, she is 40 lbs less than her highest weight and by the way we judge success she does qualify. The problem is the number she released her weight is what we focus on but why?. The real significant measure of success in weight loss is the quantifiable changes to blood pressure, blood glucose, cholesterol level etc. these numbers are evidence that the risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, decrease in quality of life and ultimately premature death have been reduced. Not once when I watched this story on TV did I hear anyone mention the effect of the weight on her overall health there was just discussion of her weight struggle through the years accompanied by a display of images of her at various weights. I commend Oprah for stating that she now cares less about getting thin and more about getting healthy but the article from what I've read only mentions her weight and we are left to deduce from BMI that I think was calculated by the media that more than likely as with other people who fall into the obese category her health indicators are not within normal limits.

Unfortunately it seems we've been conditioned to focus more on the aesthetic consequences of weight than the actual implications for our health. If we focus too much on weight then we are more likely to automatically prejudge someone who appears overweight but maybe very physically fit and have health indicators superior to a "fat" thin person. I just think that while its good the numbers on the scale are moving it is important for us to remember the significance of the other numbers associated with this movement.

cjd
12-18-2008, 02:26 PM
It's been awhile since I've posted but I check in from time to time. This subject caught my eye. The fact that Oprah still has to deal with her weight just shows that this is a difficult problem that has to be tackled every day and we can never ever really relax and assume that the problem is fixed. Even with her personal chef and exercise coaches, it is difficult, so although not impossible is perhaps even more difficult for those of us without her checkbook.
The stresses of her job and in her life make losing just as difficult as the stresses in our lives affects the way our bodies processes food. Aging and other factors make us lose weight more slowly than when we were young. For me, aging (I'll be 63 next month), lack of activity because of a sedentary job, health issues including diabetes (not on meds yet, thank goodness) and some breathing issues, a severely broken ankle that hasn't been the same and makes walking difficult, have made me yoyo back and forth losing the same pounds over and over again. 12 years ago, I lost 65 pounds and kept it off for 2 years and then put it all back plus more after my mother died. Now I play with the same 20-30 pounds over and over again. Right now, I know I must lose those 65 pounds agian but I am having difficulty finding the willpower to do it. I think it would be terrible to be Oprah and have your weight gains pictured in gossip mags. It's hard enough for me when I meet someone who knew me when I was a thin dancing teenager in high school and as a young woman in college. I want to disappear rather than face them so I think it must be even more difficult for her to be on television.

beerab
12-19-2008, 07:22 PM
I read the article in her magazine- and I think part of it was because she ended up having a thyroid problem for a while- she didn't know for the longest time and kept gaining weight till she was finally treated- I'm not sure if she's okay now- but man I can totally relate to her struggles- I'm working hard on the fast smash and have lost 8 lbs, but I swear if I slip up and have one treat that's it I gain like a pound that day- it's so frustrating- I feel like I can never enjoy eating out again or having a treat for the rest of my life :(

kari1980
12-25-2008, 03:13 AM
I also read the article in Oprah and yeah, I can see how her thyroid would cause problems. She's such a social woman and with socializing usually comes food like going to dinner parties, etc. Ugh, the temptations, esp this holiday for me!


http://www.imageuploader1.info/image/BG/Bw.gif

Angel26519
12-25-2008, 08:49 PM
I an not Oprah but let me tell you my story....

I am a real estate agent.... and as you know this has been a challenging time. I am one of the "lucky ones" in that I have had a successful career in these trying time. By "lucky" I have increased my work load from 55 hours to 80-90 hours a week. Yes, I am lucky to still be here and successful. I work hard for my "lucky".

So- I work way too much and have a butt load of stress trying to help people sell their homes before they lose it to foreclosure, to tell these people that they owe more on their homes than they are worth, that the home they bought 2 years ago is with $50,000 less..... and so on...

And then there is the guilt..... I still have my home... am I doing everything I can to help these people or is there something more? So I get up at 3am and head to the computer do work ..... and so on....

So I dont work out anymore (who has time), I eat dinner at 11:00pm... forget to eat lunch until 4:00 and my blood sugar is crashing.

I eat for stress, I eat for comfort, I eat for guilt, and oh yeah I eat because I am hungry....

And, then along the way my thyroid has gotten screwed up.... because there isnt enough with everything else....

And with all of this I have gained approximately 38 pounds in the last year. I am not proud of myself. I know better. I beat myself up for it because I have the gym equipment in my house and every dang exercise video ever made and yet I am still not doing what I am supposed to do....

So if I have this issue in my own little world, I can only imagine how rough it is for Oprah.... and I think she is brave to speak about an issue that is so painful, so personal, and can bash your self esteem to ****. It makes me realize I am not the only one and for that I appreciate her and all of you on this site.

Amarantha2
12-26-2008, 02:13 AM
I'm not a big Oprah fan, in fact, I just don't like her much, but I totally empathize with what massive inner turmoil I believe she faces regarding the losing and gaining over and over of the weight, the way she comes out with these "I've found the answer" pronouncements, shows off a fab figure and then two years later, still a very public person, she'll be back up again and she finds some new "I've found the answer" thing an it all starts again. I believe she is totally sincere in this and that she's under tremendous pressure to perform weight loss tricks for her giant audience of followers and because she's human and seems to love food and use it to soothe herself, she can't hold off the obesity for long as it wants to come back.

I feel sorry for her because I think that in her deepest heart of hearts she does not believe that she can permanently lose weight, no matter what she says in public.

Of course, she can, but I doubt if she ever will and that's sad.

kaplods
12-26-2008, 03:42 AM
I'm not sure that it really is all that sad, or that she necessarily doesn't believe in her ability to lose the weight and keep it off, rather I think that it may be much simpler than that. Weight loss is difficult for almost everyone who attempts it, and if you lose focus, even briefly, you can backslide (but this is true of many tasks in life).

No one can "do it all," and no matter who you are, when you juggle a lot of tasks, you're bound to drop some balls. Prioritizing and making sure the important stuff is getting the most attention is a struggle for us all, and giving our weight "just the right" amount of attention and value can be very difficult.

I think too often, we've been taught to think of weight struggles to signify some internal mental or emotional struggle that isn't necessarily there. If someone were having difficulty learning their job skills, or to play a musical instrument, or say to save money for a special purchase, we wouldn't necessarily attribute the difficulty to the types of emotional or psychological failing that we do when talking about obesity. Nor would we necessarily call continued struggling as failure.

Losing weight is one of the most common New Year's resolution, along with saving more/spending less money, cleaning/organization.

Yet, if a person has a life-long struggle with finances, house cleaning, or organization, along with occasional set backs and backsliding in their goals, we don't look at it in the same way as a life-long struggle with weight or weight slips and backslides.

Hypothyroidism is certainly an understandable factor in gaining weight, and although 40 lbs sounds like a tremendous amount, I've known quite a few thin folks who gained that much weight before being able to get their weight back under control.

My brother for example has always been extremely fit, and coming back from Iraq, he started putting on weight very quickly. His doctors blamed his retirement, his post-traumatic stress, his physical injuries.... and it turned out to be a hypothyroid condition (which they only discovered because my brother was too stubborn to accept their explanations and badgered them into testing for other explanations).

Jen415
12-29-2008, 10:17 AM
She admitted that most of her weight gain is attributed to "taking herself off her priority list." That is something we ALL have done.

To me, this just shows she is human, like me...and like you.

Honestly, do any of us EVER "beat" this weight thing??

beerab
12-29-2008, 03:06 PM
wow angel, that's crazy- I had to learn myself to treat myself as number one- not to give in and eat out because my hubby doesn't want to eat his veggies, and so on. I stopped worrying about everyone else and worried about me- I now eat for me- if my hubby wants a warm and nutritious dinner great- if not he can figure it out for himself! lol.

rockinrobin
12-29-2008, 03:31 PM
She admitted that most of her weight gain is attributed to "taking herself off her priority list." That is something we ALL have done.

To me, this just shows she is human, like me...and like you.

Honestly, do any of us EVER "beat" this weight thing??

Nope. I will never, ever be "cured". There will never be a time when I can let up. When I can let my guard down. Never. Ever. This will be a life long issue for me. Can't fix it. But can manage it.

It's a roller coaster, that's for sure.

Beautiful Ace
12-29-2008, 03:41 PM
Just because she has money, and is famous, doesn't mean she's not a real person. I think it's kind of rude to just assume that anybody with money could do what those without money can't. Money doesn't give you willpower ffs.

grneyedmustang
12-29-2008, 03:47 PM
She admitted that most of her weight gain is attributed to "taking herself off her priority list." That is something we ALL have done.

To me, this just shows she is human, like me...and like you.

Honestly, do any of us EVER "beat" this weight thing??


My two cents - in a nutshell - no.

I realized that for the rest of my life, if I want to continue and/or maintain my weight loss, I have to exercise. I cannot go back to a diet of pizza, fries, burgers, hot wings, and cheesecake. Sure, I've had my periods of "why can't I be naturally skinny? Why is it other people can eat what they want and not gain?" I now realize that if I don't want to gain weight, then I have to keep working out, keep watching my carb intake, keep watching how much alcohol I drink. Much like recovering alcoholics have to monitor and limit their alcohol intake for the REST OF THEIR LIFE.

This isn't the first time in my life that I've lost a significant amount of weight. When I "lose focus" and stop watching what I'm eating and/or stop working out, then I gain weight quickly.

I've realized and accepted this is a battle I will have to fight for the duration of my life. At this point, I think I've made peace with it.

JuliaW
12-30-2008, 12:53 PM
Oprah is human, as we all are. Someone should invite her to visit this site and get support here. You folks provide excellent support. I've been lurking for a while and this is my first post.

kaplods
12-30-2008, 01:24 PM
I think it's easy to think of weight loss much like a race or at least a journey with a particular destination and a fairly straight path to get there, but if you tried to create a map from the path most of us take, it is far from a linear journey for most of us. Instead, our paths often meander, take detours, backtrack, sidetrack, and end up going in circles (sometimes even when we're not lost).

I think we've got to stop judging folks (whether celebrity or peasantry) for "messy" travel. Of course, it would be ideal (and hail to those who can manage it) to traverse an unobstructed course as straight as "the crow flies," and to never lose ground once the goal is achieved, but I think those folks are by far the exception, rather than the rule.

I think for most folks, weight loss is not so much a simple journey, as a battle or even war, and we're not all facing the same enemy. And not only do each of us have different strengths and weaknesses, but we have a different number of enemies with different degrees of strengths. To make things even more complicated, often our enemies change during our lifetime, as well. When our enemies gain strength (say in the case of a developing thyroid condition) or we lose strength (maybe due to some additional stress in our lives), it's possible to lose ground.

Losing a particular battle, or even a series of battles, doesn't have to mean losing the war.

ennay
01-02-2009, 06:58 PM
I heard her say once that what she wanted was to get to a point where weight and food was no longer an issue. I know that is my biggest "wish".

It is a hard thing to realized that it can never be. That to some extent it will ALWAYS be an issue. That it ALWAYS has to be a priority.

LivingInEgypt
01-03-2009, 08:01 AM
I'm a newbie and this is my first post - so hope I don't put my foot in it in any way.
I echo many of the prior posts which say that Oprah is, after all, human. Yes she DOES have an advantage from her wealth iro a personal trainer, being able to afford a cook etc - but her wealth can also be a disadvantage, as after all she can afford the best desserts / cheeses (or whatever her particular downfall is) that this world can offer - and boy oh boy lets face it there are so very many temptations out there when it comes to unhealthy food. No doubt she too works long hard hours, and after a hard day eating maybe healthily, how easy it is to just chill out in front of the TV with a box of chocs?? In a cruel kind of way (and actually I don't mean to be cruel) I'm kinda glad; after all if she had stayed permanently slim then it would be all to easy for me and others to just say 'well of course [I]she[I] can afford to stay get/stay slim with all her money, but I'll never be able to as I have a struggle making ends meet'. At least it shows us all that weight loss and keeping it off are a struggle for people 'like us' no matter what walk of life we are from and how much money we have. I hope she does well losing her weight again, and hope too - and maybe some of you won't agree with this - that maybe she doesn't aim to lose SO much weight this time around - maybe sometimes we need to be content with yes losing weight, being active and eating healthily, but also if we are 10 or even 20 pounds overweight but can maintain that kinda weight, then its much much better than the yo-yoing all over the place, surely ?
All the best to all.

S

JackieRn
01-03-2009, 10:21 AM
Given that there are plenty of examples in real life, on this site and others as well as on TV and in magazines of regular people losing weight successfully and improving their health, its unfortunate that people might reason that someone with the advantage of wealth is ONLY successful at weight loss as a result of their resources and there for they have an excuse as to why they can't make any changes. I think given her influence by losing the weight Oprah inspires a lot of people some of whom aren't well off. I for one hope for the sake of her health she is able to make the necessary changes and make them permanently.

kahlua
01-13-2009, 03:23 PM
So many good points....I confess to being quick to judge..who wouldn't like a cook to make healthy meals..and a trainer to shag out butts off the couch? Obviously the truth with her is the same truth we all carry...it ain't easy. If it were easy, everyone would be happy with their current body. She has hit her 50's...and I truely believe that our bodies change every 10 years..what was safe to eat/drink in our 30's may wreck havoc 10-20 years from now. She has hit another milestone..but it sure beats the alternative. Bottom line, it's up to all of us...even her..to get our butts moving..and eating better. There is no magic pill..if there were, you know she would have it!;)
K

kaplods
01-13-2009, 03:36 PM
In the scheme of things 200 lbs at age 50 is still pretty remarkable, especially after struggling with higher weights when you were younger. To be fifty and not at your highest weight ever, that's pretty good really.

I'm not saying she should stay at 200 lbs, but is this really backsliding or just struggling with the changes that naturally come with age (like the hypothyroid).

It's all a matter of perspective, because what I wouldn't give to reach 200 lbs. If I could "only" struggle with 50 lbs instead of 200 or more, that would be heavenly.

It's so tiresome to see an "all or nothing" judgement when it comes to weight - not only for celebrities, but in our daily lives as well. It can make anyone feel that if they've put on five pounds "what's the use, I might as well keep eating."

I don't know why a more realistic attitude toward weight loss and weight maintenance isn't more common.

kahlua
01-13-2009, 04:19 PM
Kaplods,
You are so right. I appreciate your perspective re: "you'd be thrilled to weigh 200 lbs." As you mentioned, Oprah has certainly been bigger than she is today at 200 lbs. I think we are our worst critics. I'm not sure if there are any men that lurke or even partcipate in this 3FC but I wonder if men are as tough on themselves as we woman are tough on ourselves. As you mentioned, someone gains 5 lbs...someone else notices the 5 lbs..makes a snarky comment..feelings get hurt..what the ****..may as well keep eating...etc..etc. I think we need to be more gentle with ourselves..and maybe a little less judgemental in general with regards to weight gain. A big or small casket is still a casket...who cares how much it weighs..we aren't carrying it! :D. Let's try to enjoy what we have and if we fall off the weight wagon, so be it..if ya want to get back on the wagon, get back on it and forget about falling off...go forward! :dancer:
K

170starting
01-15-2009, 11:23 AM
I feel bad for Oprah... She does in fact have a thyroid problem and like the rest of us, she loves food. I cant imagine how hard it is to be in the public eye, feeling that everyone is commenting on how much weight you have gained... I feel that way, and I am just a hometown girl. :( I hope she succeeds in achieving her goal again. :)

Thighs Be Gone
01-15-2009, 11:30 AM
I agree with the other posters that this is definitely a lifelong journey with lifelong choices to be made. Really, it is a journey. Sometimes, we get rerouted and have layovers in unexpected cities. The important thing is finding a way to continue the right direction.

brookypooh
01-15-2009, 11:49 PM
Food as an addiction I believe with my whole heart is true or I would not be sitting here craving chocolate so bad right now and because I am a smoker to I know what a craving feels like when you are addicted to something. Why wouldn't they make foods that would addict us then we buy more right?

Please lets not forget the being "big" used to be a beautiful thing. Now being almost bones is what the media considers beautiful. I would love to say that if I had operas money I would do this or do that but I can hardly get off my big butt and do my turbo jam even though its not going to kill me and I really should do it and I have unlimited access to it.

Yes people who don't exercise and over eat when they know its bad for them lack will power and I say that with a lot of certainty because I do my self with those things and with smoking. I think will power can come and go right now I have it for eating right but not for exercise. and I feel like the addiction to something greatly takes away from you will power. What a vicious cycle.

Not being able to really be in her world means we have no idea why she eats when she eats or what she eats or what made her not want to get on the treadmill and what did kwim?

But **** why not go get lipo because that is the easiest way I can think of to lose weight fast but she hasn't (as far as I know) and I really respect her for not doing that and struggling like the rest of us!

ohfaithful
06-17-2009, 04:29 AM
Hi, food is definitely an addiction but sometimes there are other factors that contribute to weight gain.... I think she was donig well until her thyroid and ovarian hormonal imbalances kicked in and now she is struggling. Those two things alone can make it extremely difficul to lose weight and keep it off. She obviously exercises every day and trys to eat whole foods but the downside is that after a certain age some foods work against you whether they are whole are not. I am dealing with this very thing, although exercise is almost nonexistent but I eat the right foods and the weight still does not come off. I am on hormone replacement as she is and I have low thyroid function as she does...it is tough and makes you want to scream.

I did a 10 week couch to 5k program where I watched my food intake and exercised every day, ultimately ending up doing more than 3 miles at a time and only lost two pounds during that 10 week program. It took me 6 months to lose 20 pounds.

I used to lose well on low carb but now can't seem to lose a pound so I've upped my carbs...it is a constant challenge and one has to be on top of things and constantly tweaking...I thoroughly understand how mind boggling it can be and how many time I just want to give up...

Tracy
06-18-2009, 12:39 PM
I also have a thyroid problem. I had to have it out,because of nodgules {sp}
that kept growing. I really wanted to blame that on my weight gain and problems w/losing. But, my Dr. said it only could be contributed to about 15 lbs,. Darn it!:tantrum:Especially if someone is on the right meds for it.It shouldn't be too much of a problem.

MiZTaCCen
01-09-2010, 03:00 PM
WHy is it that a woman like Oprah that can afford a trainer and a great chef still can't drop a few lbs? SHe has been struggling her entire life with her weight even though she has all the tools in the world to lose weight. Does that mean the rest of us are hopeless???

I know this is far fetch, but maybe she just wants to seem real? You know like us normal people who CAN'T afford trainers, who DON'T have Chefs. Maybe she just wants to be different and prove to the world of normal people that you don't have to have ALL this stuff to loose weight.

Also I don't think it makes us hopeless, you need to want something to get it. Once you have the mentality that you want it you'll start to do it. Everyone's weight is different didn't oprah try some silly diet? When you want to loose weight you have to remember even AFTER you lost it all you still have to maintain a healthy diet. Maybe she didn't maybe she fell off the ban wagon after being on a silly less then 1000 cals a day diet. It happens.

kaplods
01-09-2010, 03:34 PM
Rereading this thread has gotten my thinking. Why would we expect celebrities to have any better life-skills and life-success than anyone else?

It's obvious (from the tabloids, and legitimate news as well) that celebrities are not exempt from (and may even be more prone to) life's turmoils and tragedies such as legal problems, financial problems and bankruptcy, mental illness, substance abuse, domestic violence, divorce, marital infidelity, racism...

The myth of celebrity making life better, is probably more myth than fact. The only thing more money and attention seems to bring anyone is access to more stuff (not just good stuff, but bad stuff too), more enemies and more fair-weather friends.

I've never understood the cult of celebrity, especially when it comes to weight loss. Why on earth, would we expect an actress or tv journalist, a fashion model or a celebutante to have a corner on health and weight loss knowledge - and why would I expect their experiences to relate to mine?

Of course they have access to better healthcare, but there are also a lot of quacks out there, ready to tell a celebrity whatever they want to hear in order to get their money. I think because for many celebrities, their appearance IS their livlihood, it only makes them more desperate for extreme and unhealthy methods to lose weight. They're not looking down the road to their long-term health, they're trying to lose weight for their next movie role, or red-carpet event. To misapply the quote by Heidi Klum, "One minute you're in, and the next minute you're out."

I think many celebs are worrying far more about "staying in," than what they're doing to their bodies in the long run. In many ways, they're the last people we should be looking to for role models of living a balanced, healthy life.

jigglefree
01-09-2010, 06:09 PM
IMHO life is what we make it based on what we want out of it. Living healthy is an individual decision. So let us all make a decision to be an example or encouragement for someone else.

I find it more hopeful when someone on 3FC post their journey and weight loss results, their struggle and maintenance time. I get excited...real excited and hope reigns eternal.

Naama
01-10-2010, 10:46 AM
To Kaplods, re: why do we expect from celebrities..

I think that in the current cultural ambiance, to BE a celebrity is the essence of being successful (I don't think it's true - but it is culturally true). So, everything they do may be seen as steps towards ultimate success - including how they eat, how they exercise, etc. It's weird really, and so not logical, but they are the paradigms, you know? In place of the heros, the gods... we now have Britney Spears... <deep sigh>

bargoo
01-10-2010, 11:09 AM
Hey, I totally understand it. If it was just an issue of affordability only poor people would have weight problems. Everyone else would just write a check.

How many people here have "been able to afford" Jenny Craig or Weight Watchers or joining Bally's....why don't they have 100% success based on having the money to do these things?

Bottom line Oprah is a human being and struggles with comfort/stress eating and other weight-related issues as I do.

Money and fame doesn't save you from that, or drug addiction, alcoholism, divorce, sickness.....you still struggle with everything except being broke!

I agree 100%. Food addiction is an equal opportunity problem, being famous and wealthy has nothing to do with it.

JulieJ08
01-10-2010, 11:34 AM
I find it more hopeful when someone on 3FC post their journey and weight loss results, their struggle and maintenance time. I get excited...real excited and hope reigns eternal.

Oh wow, SO very true. We chicks are powerful, every one of us.