Dieting with Obstacles - sleep apnea and weight gain?




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flatiron
12-06-2008, 03:11 AM
I was diagnosed with sleep apnea about 4 months ago. I think I have had it for years and years because i can remember many times waking up in the middle of the night panting. Also I used to fall asleep aal the time and every one used to think it was funny. I was tired ALL the time.

Since the diagnosis I got one of those CPAP contraptions and I sleep like a baby now.

I didn't know anything about sleep apnea but I have been reading. I have ALL the classic symptoms ... weight gain, memory loss, chronic insomnia, high blood pressure and anxiety attacks.

The machine is amazing, I don't know how it works but I just know it does, I can sleep 9 hours straight with that dumb mask on my face.

I am hoping that if I can bring my weight down I will no longer have sleep apnea or have high blood pressuer. I HATE the idea of HAVING to take pills every day!

I wonder if the sleep apnea is addressed then all the symtoms go away? I hope so!


glynne
12-06-2008, 09:09 AM
Hi Flatiron,

I have recently been diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea also. I will be getting my CPAP machine in a couple weeks. I am glad to hear that you sleep better with the machine. That is my hope too. I struggle with my weight ~ I know I need to exercise to help my weight loss, but I often just feel to tired to care about doing what I know I need to do.

I hope I get good results of better rest and feeling better once I start using the machine.

kaplods
12-06-2008, 12:30 PM
At my highest weight, I was diagnosed with sleep apnea, and after losing only about 35 to 40 lbs, the apnea disappeared, and I'm off the CPAP.

My first 20 lbs "fell off" without me trying. I can't say the CPAP was responsible as there were a lot of other things going on in my life at the time, including not working (not eating out of the vending machine, certainly helped).


JulieJ08
12-06-2008, 01:52 PM
I definitely think sleep is part of the equation. Obviously food and activity are bigger parts of the equation for obesity, but the contribution of great sleep (or the bad contribution of sleep deprivation) I think has been underrated. Enjoy feeling better!

kelly315
12-06-2008, 02:09 PM
From your info, it looks like you were in the upper 200s (your weight) when you were diagnosed... is that true? If so, there's a large chance that your sleep apnea may greatly (if not totally) caused by weight. A lot of people either lessen the seriousness of the apnea (have fewer events per night) or get rid of it enough to not need the mask anymore.


Did your sleep doctor look into your mouth when you were diagnosed? He should have told you about your tongue position and tonsil position, and if you were a good candidate for surgery. From what I was told, those who's sleep apnea is based more on pressure in the neck and chest than on closeness of the tonsils and the tongue are more likely to benefit from weight loss, and have a better chance of losing the apnea completely.

Either way, weight loss lessens sleep apnea in almost all people. I only have mild apnea (its more severe when I sleep on my back, but I don't), and I've noticed that I wake up with fewer events per night. I might have another sleep study done after I've reached goal.

flatiron
12-12-2008, 11:44 PM
From your info, it looks like you were in the upper 200s (your weight) when you were diagnosed... is that true? If so, there's a large chance that your sleep apnea may greatly (if not totally) caused by weight.

Did your sleep doctor look into your mouth when you were diagnosed? He should have told you about your tongue position and tonsil position, and if you were a good candidate for surgery. .

Correct I was about 275 when diagnosed but I think I have had it for many years as before being diagnosed I had all kinds of sleep problems like really bad insomnia, waking up fatigued, narcolepsy and restless leg syndrome.

Doc never looked in my mouth. Just did a sleep study and they said I had moderate apnea. They said I stopped breathing 20 times from 9pm till 3pm. That is not so bad I have a buddy who did a sleep study and he stopped breathing 800 times in one night! He had his CPAP the next day.

I don't have regular insurance, I go to a VA Hospital so the service is not great but pretty good and most def better than nothing.

I am hoping and praying that if I lose weight I will not need the CPAP machine ever again.