General chatter - Need LOTS of opinions :)




View Full Version : Need LOTS of opinions :)


Ashley
11-20-2008, 10:27 AM
So, I recently found out that a local animal shelter actually puts animals down if they've been in the shelter along time.The HUGE animal lover that I am, wasn't very happy with this. So, I decided to find ways to help raise money to help prevent that, to buy supplies they need to help take care of the animals and hopefully help find them homes. I came up with "Candles for Charity" its an insanely stupid name for it, but thats just how I ended up naming it. I enjoy making candles, and I thought, why no make them for a good cause? All the profits from them would go straight to helping animals.

I just need alot of opinions on this before I start making millions of candles, haha.

Thanks :)


Extasee58865
11-20-2008, 10:54 AM
What kind of candles are you talking about? Stick candles, jar candles, votives? Do you make different scents? How much do you plan on selling for? I LOVE CANDLES! I'd buy some if they were the right kind for the right price, tell me more! :-) It's super nice of you to think of doing something like that.

MadelinRose
11-20-2008, 10:59 AM
The holidays are coming up, and that means holiday bazaars!!! It hopefully isn't too short notice - I'm sure there are some craft bazaars planned soon in your community. If you think it's possible to make enough candles to sell by then, what a great way to get yourself out there! Everyone loves candles during the winter, and you could make them holiday- or winter-themed too.


Ashley
11-20-2008, 11:13 AM
I really just know how to make gel candles, but I can put them in basically anything. I already made two that are in these old fashioned jars (i'll post a pic below) I can add scents to them, or colors, but I think in gel you can't have both. But I can make jar and votives. I've made margarita candles too for friends. I probably wouldn't sell them for more than 5 dollars. Depends on the size, the gel wax isn't that cheap. The scents arn't that cheap either.

Here's some pictures:

http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f203/achristine121/Picture058-1.jpg
"Old Fashioned" they have a cranberry vanilla scent. The only two I have though.

http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f203/achristine121/Picture057-1.jpg

http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f203/achristine121/Picture056-1.jpg

The last two I made for a friend.

jmb1981
11-20-2008, 11:13 AM
i think it sounds like a wonderful idea, my only thought after reading is have you spoke with the shelter? will providing them with some extra money be enough to make them keep the animals longer? and how much longer will they keep them? will they still end up putting them down? are they already overcrowded and if people keep bringing in more animals what happens? i hate the thought of animals being put down. i would just want some more answers from the shelter before proceeding. i know that the shelter where i am at is always looking for contributions, food, money, or whatever else they may need b/c i don't think a lot of people think about what it costs to have one open. i think raising money for the shelter is a great idea! i know that they would be grateful to you for helping them out. i'm just saying ask more questions. if you are wanting to do this to try to prevent animals from being put down, make sure that is what you are going to get. great idea though!

Ashley
11-20-2008, 11:19 AM
Well, I was just about to email the United States Humane Society. I used to donate to them every month. I thought it would be nicer to donate them because they help animal shelthers all over the US. Not just the one near me. I think it would be nicer to help with all of them instead of just one.

I'll talk to them and let you guys know what they say :)

nelie
11-20-2008, 11:19 AM
My advice would be to talk to the shelter and tell them your concern and interest. You might be able to work with them and maybe they could help host an event or something.

It may be their policy that no matter what they will put animals down. You may actually have better success working with local rescue organizations. Rescue organizations will often take animals out of shelters before they are put down. Also, does your shelter have a foster program? Could you be a foster parent for animal? How about being a volunteer?

There are very few county/city shelters that won't put animals down. I know my local shelter will put animals down but they do everything to adopt animals out and its just a matter of space. They have a huge foster program and they have lots of community outreach projects.

Slashnl
11-20-2008, 11:24 AM
Just a thought... what kind of liabilities are you taking on? Will you need to get insurance? What bookkeeping will you need to do to make sure that you don't get into any kind of tax trouble?

Sorry, but I work in insurance, so this is how I think. I would be concerned about product liability exposures. What if one of the candles broke and a fire started? Whether you did anything wrong at all doesn't matter sometimes when their is a lawsuit.

zeffryn
11-20-2008, 11:25 AM
While I think it is a very honorable idea, the reasons why they put the animals down in the first place is because they are overcrowded. An overcrowded shelter is not a good environment for an animal. They do not get the attention they need. Food and shelter is just the beginning of an animal's basic needs.

As Slashnl mentioned, you also need to be aware of state/federal laws regarding these kinds of charities. You, most likely, will need some sort of license and a tax code. It seems like a lot of work to start, but if neglected can end up costing you thousands in fines.

This link may give you some of the answers to the more mundane aspects of starting this endeavor.
http://www.wikihow.com/Start-a-Charity

I encourage you to find a way to raise awareness about adopting animals from the shelters, and in general making wise decisions before buying a pet in the first place so they do not end up in the shelter. Population control is also important. Most shelters offer a reduced price on spaying and neutering, especially if the animal is a stray.

TJFitnessDiva
11-20-2008, 11:45 AM
My advice would be to talk to the shelter and tell them your concern and interest. You might be able to work with them and maybe they could help host an event or something.

It may be their policy that no matter what they will put animals down. You may actually have better success working with local rescue organizations. Rescue organizations will often take animals out of shelters before they are put down. Also, does your shelter have a foster program? Could you be a foster parent for animal? How about being a volunteer?

There are very few county/city shelters that won't put animals down. I know my local shelter will put animals down but they do everything to adopt animals out and its just a matter of space. They have a huge foster program and they have lots of community outreach projects.

I agree with Nelie....talk with the shelter first. Your best bet would to move on to help the rescue organizations...these are the ones that will help remove animals from that shelter that are at an immediate risk to be put down.

I do wildlife rehab so I'll get a call from our local shelter if they happen to get a "domesticated" wild animal....I'll then go pick it up and hopefully teach it to live back in the wild. If they are too imprinted then I use these as education animals and work with the local zoo in educating the public about these animals. Not the same, I know, but without donations and grants I wouldn't be able to do this.

Ashley
11-20-2008, 11:48 AM
Thanks for the opinions guys.

alinnell
11-20-2008, 11:59 AM
Talk to the shelter and if they aren't willing to work with you, look for a local rescue organization. Rescues take animals from shelters, house, feed and train them and find them "forever" homes. They are always in need of donations.

jessisaokay
11-20-2008, 12:29 PM
my mom runs a non profit animal rescue and i know they always appreciate donations of any kind whether it's money or supplies.

JulieJ08
11-20-2008, 01:05 PM
Well, I was just about to email the United States Humane Society. I used to donate to them every month. I thought it would be nicer to donate them because they help animal shelthers all over the US. Not just the one near me. I think it would be nicer to help with all of them instead of just one.

I'll talk to them and let you guys know what they say :)

Do whatever is right for you. But I think it is just great when your efforts can be local and connected to you. It builds community.

GatorgalstuckinGA
11-20-2008, 08:53 PM
i think its a great effort you want to do..but definately talk to the shelter first. I'm a veterinarian and was once a shelter vet. What i will tell you about shelter medicine..many won't like or understand. due to the massive amount of overpopulation...kill shelters are a necessity. Until people start spaying/neutering their pets...it will always be a necessity. What happens with a no kill shelter is either one of two things..either
1. the nokill shelter gets filled up very fast and can no longer take animals in or
2. the nokill shelter takes too many pets over their required amount they can contain...that starts the spread of diseases and causes many animals to be euthanized due to chronic sickness.
While a no kill shelter is great and wonderful..until people start taking responsibilities for their pets (spay/neuter) kill shelters will always be a necessity. I hated doing what i had to do (i was actually a army veterinarian with a animal shelter on post). But i also knew i had to do it. i've been to no kill shelter and have seen some at their best and worse. If they over populate their shelter (which a lot want to do) then animals get sick and sometimes never recover..no matter how good cleaning procedure are etc. i wish you luck in what you want to do, just talk to the shelter first.

kaplods
11-20-2008, 10:00 PM
Our community is facing the dilemma on shelter euthanasia. Our humane society is not a no-kill shelter. A new no-kill shelter has opened up, and the humane society is facing a very uncertain future. What may end up happening is that most people are going to want to take their unwanted pets to the "no-kill" shelter. The no-kill shelter will not accept ill or suffering animals - those will go to the humane society. The humane society will receive less funding, simply because there are now two shelters, and also as many people will prefer to donate to no-kill shelter (not thinking about the lives of animals that are suffering mentally or physically).

Now the humane society is going to end up with a higher number (or perhaps only) the animals that are vicious or otherwise mentally or physically ill and suffering- the ones the no-kill shelter will just refuse to accept, and the humane society will have to do the "dirty work." The humane society volunteers will have only the pain of having to euthanize sick and suffering animals, with none of the joys of seeing their charges go off to good and loving homes.

If the humane society closes, what will the no-kill shelter do with suffering animals? Let them live out their lives in pain and misery? Find some shelter that will do the "dirty work," or just refuse admission to those cases? Will people take the extra step to find a shelter who will put their suffering pet to sleep, or will they abandon them on the highway or in the country?

I volunteered at humane societies in IL and WI, and both considered euthanasia a last resort - but it was often the most merciful choice. The two humane societies I volunteered for were lucky and only had to euthanize physically or mentally ill animals. Dogs that were vicious and unsafe around humans and other dogs were sometimes euthanized if training didn't work, because life in a small cage was seen as a fate worse than death (and I agree). Some dogs were euthanized because they went "stir crazy" from being kept in a cage for long periods of time. They tore at themselves and injured themselves because a ten foot by six foot run, even with two daily walks and play time wasn't enough for their mental stability. The dog I saw this happen to had been in the shelter over a year, and not one family had asked to see him. The only attention he ever got was from the shelter staff on his daily walks.

There are things worse than death, for both animals and humans. Before deciding that there is something wrong with your shelter, learn more about your shelters policies before you judge them - the whens and whys euthanasia is considered.

TinkFreak117
11-21-2008, 12:23 AM
wow... while reading your thread it made me tear up.. about a month ago my mom took our cat named mio (which means MY in italian bc its my cat) to the spca because it was peeing on the furniture and it wouldn't stop =\ it upsets me knowing hes there and not with us and NOW reading that he could possibly be put down if he doesn't find a home =\ I would DEFINITELY support your candle idea... please go through with it... I'm sure there are many people who feel the way you do or have a similar situation as I do and would buy them. GOOD LUCK =)

flaminjo
11-21-2008, 12:57 AM
well, i think the name is not at all stupid. and above all the cause for which you are starting this more important. i support you and if you want any help from me in the cause i am ready to do the work for your cause, coz before marriage i was a member of People for Ethical Treatment of Animals, but since last 4 years i have been busy with my married life, kid

Ashley
11-21-2008, 09:43 AM
I'm not "judging" my shelter. I understand that if the animal is sick or injured and there is nothing they can do then the animal needs put down. I did say, I wasn't happy if they were there for awhile and couldn't get a home and there was nothing wrong with them AND they get put down for that. That to me isn't fair. I've volunteered too, so I already know what my shelter is like. I just wanted to find ways to help animals get homes to avoid being put down.

Ufi
11-21-2008, 12:34 PM
The shelter here has had huge success with a fostering program. Basically, animals go home with volunteers, some of them ones that help train animals that need help. Some animals are in the shelter for people to see, but otherwise ones are rotated through homes so they aren't just locked up. The animals are happier when they are exposed to people who might adopt them, so people are more likely to adopt them. Also, there's a friends of the shelter that raises money for the shelter, so if you have one of those there, they could handle selling the candles for you. The one here sells all sorts of things.

kaplods
11-21-2008, 01:10 PM
My point wasn't at all that you were judging your shelter, but that no-kill shelters get alot of great press, and humane societies get a bum rap. If the wrong kind of help is given, it can cause a lot more pain to the community and to the animals that it helps. I just illustrated with the case in our community, because a lot of wonderful people with their heart in the right place, thinking that meant building a no-kill shelter, to replace the "evil humane society," probably made the situation in our community worse, not better.

Since a no-kill shelter's reputation hinges on no killing, they do not put sick animals down - they make somebody else do it. Being a humane society volunteer is sad enough without being forced to only do the dirty work someone else isn't willing to do. I'm just saying that in your volunteer efforts, be aware of this and don't make your solution add to, rather than solve the problem.

A fostering program would be excellent. It addresses the problem without condemning or replacing the humane society. I wish our no-kill folks would have thought of that, instead of being adversarial with the humane society. The humane society tried to work with the group, to provide a solution they both could work within, so that the community didn't end up with two large shelters with only the financial ability to support one. The no-kill folks refused because they do not want euthanasia under any circumstances to be associated with "their" facility. Instead of making the situation better for the animals, people let their egos get in the way, and animals and people are going to suffer for it.

I'm just asking you to learn from the mistakes made in our community. Choose your brand of help, carefully, and if at all possible work with rather than at cross-purposes with your humane society.