General chatter - I don't want to pay full price for glasses!




walking2lose
11-17-2008, 07:05 PM
Hi folks,

I have an eye doctor appointment Wednesday, and I know I will need a new prescription. I don't want to pay $375.00 again for glasses!

You see, I've only had glasses now for about a year and a half. Everything was getting slightly blurry, so when I went in to get tested, I was told I needed TRI focals! Yes, pretty challenging for my first pair of specs ever. Anyway, I got the precision lenses as they're called, adjusted to them, and all was well until the last month or so when I realized my eyes have gotten worse.

Since I am a novice at this glasses thing, what are my options? Can I just go in to the eye doc, get the script, and tell her I prefer to save $ and have it filled at say, WalMart? I'm not sure how it works. What I do know is that I almost fell over last time when told my bill was 375.00!!! I have insurance, so that totally surprised me.

Also, when do you know if it's time to switch to contacts?

Any ideas/advice/suggestions are welcomed in advance! Thanks!


nelie
11-17-2008, 07:14 PM
You can buy your glasses anywhere you want. So yes you can tell the doc that you just want the prescription.

You can buy your glasses at Walmart, Costco, etc wherever it is cheapest for you. You can even order them online.

mandalinn82
11-17-2008, 07:19 PM
I buy all of my glasses online. Enter your prescription, pick a frame (most have money back guarantees if you don't like the frame you pick, and they let you print out samples so you can see approx sizing, etc), and send to you. I like www.39dollarglasses.com and have never had anything but good experiences. And yes, the 39 dollars is frames and lenses...but not taxes and shipping.


PhotoChick
11-17-2008, 07:39 PM
Contact lenses is a pretty personal decision for everyone. You should talk to your eye doctor about it. And keep in mind that contacts are often more expensive than glasses - by the time you buy the contacts, the solution, and the followup visits.

But for contacts or glasses, you should ask for a copy of your prescription anyway - no matter where you buy them. Taht way if anything happens to your glasses or contacts, you can have the script filled anywhere. I always take a copy with me when I travel, just in case.

.

GatorgalstuckinGA
11-17-2008, 07:42 PM
definately go whereever you want for glasses. Just get a script from your doctor, they can't deny you a script

as for contact lenses...i'm not sure, talk to your dr..finding contacts for your someone that needs trifocals, may not work well for contacts. And if they do work they usually are expensive. I have an astigmatism in both eyes and i have to use special contacts that are twice the price of normal contacts.

PhotoChick
11-17-2008, 07:45 PM
Yup. I have dry eyes, so I have to wear the extremely thin, wet contacts that can be replaced every two weeks. I pay about $300 every six months for my lenses. Plus, of course, the solution to clean them with, which is about $6 a bottle 1 a month or so.

.

raw23
11-17-2008, 07:53 PM
Wow, trifocals are quite an adjustment when starting out.

Contacts are a re-occurring expense. I would've recommended asking your dr about gas permeable - sometimes they can slow worsening eye sight, but I'm not sure about that because you need trifocals. I don't know how that might work.

I was a optician for a little while and we would get frames and just send them out to have the lenses replaced. You might be able to do that if you dont want to give up your frames.

cbmare
11-17-2008, 07:57 PM
My contacts are expensive, too. I think this may be the last year I buy them. My glasses aren't cheap either. Clark Howard recommends Zinni Optical. I'm not sure if they would have your glasses. http://zennioptical.com/cart/home.php

I'm going to look at the place Manda recommends, too.

cbmare
11-17-2008, 08:01 PM
Check your insurance. Some policies only replace the lenses yearly and the frames every 2 years. Reusing the frames will save you some money.

bargoo
11-17-2008, 08:02 PM
I have had my prescription filled at WalMart and Sears and they are just as good as the higher priced ones.

JulieJ08
11-17-2008, 08:06 PM
Definitely check your insurance. There may be special allowances for when a prescription has changed sooner than the usual replacement time.

CountingDown
11-17-2008, 08:23 PM
Is there an optometry school near you? I found that they can be cheaper and do a nice job. I have also gotten glasses at Wal-mart and been very pleased with them!

Also - have you considered multi-focal lenses (progressive)? They take a bit of getting used to, but once you do - they are MUCH nicer than tri focals for focusing in on those "odd" distances.

walking2lose
11-17-2008, 09:21 PM
Yup. I have dry eyes, so I have to wear the extremely thin, wet contacts that can be replaced every two weeks. I pay about $300 every six months for my lenses. Plus, of course, the solution to clean them with, which is about $6 a bottle 1 a month or so.

.

Wow, I didn't realize they were so expensive!

And, yeah, with tri-focals, I may not be a candidate anyway.

walking2lose
11-17-2008, 09:23 PM
Is there an optometry school near you? I found that they can be cheaper and do a nice job. I have also gotten glasses at Wal-mart and been very pleased with them!

Also - have you considered multi-focal lenses (progressive)? They take a bit of getting used to, but once you do - they are MUCH nicer than tri focals for focusing in on those "odd" distances.

Counting, yes, I have "progressive" lenses! That's what I meant... not sure where I came up with "precision." :dizzy: They still took me a good 3-4 months to really get used to them.

walking2lose
11-17-2008, 09:29 PM
I don't know how to quote and reply to everyone in one post... but to all of you, THANK YOU for your responses! Very helpful!

I will definitely be checking out those websites - at $39.00, I may get 2 pairs!!

I am pretty steamed that on my first (and only) visit to the eye doctor (optometrist or optomologist?), NO options were presented to me AT ALL. I was given my exam, the dr. discussed my need for tri-focals and encouraged me to go with the progressive lenses (which I agreed to), and I was then ushered to the "frame girl" who showed a selection of frames and fitted me for the ones I liked. My options were somewhat limited because with progressive lenses, the frame needs to be big enough to accommodate them.

Once finished there, I was ushered to the checkout, told my bill was $375, of which I had to pay half then and half when I picked them up in a week.

I understand they are a business, but I now feel like a big sucker who just went through the assembly line, didn't ask questions, and got stuck with a HUGE bill (IMO!).

Thanks for educating me girls, and I can't wait to check the sites!

CountingDown
11-17-2008, 10:00 PM
Claire - time to find a new optometrist (or at least buy your glasses somewhere else)

And - for the record - yes - you do need a certain size lens with progressives, but - it is smaller all the time.

I have a small Levi's frame that is very chic and fun with my progressives. It is OK to take your prescription and get a second or third opinion!

You always want to walk out with a copy of your prescription - regardless - because - who knows - you might need to get new glasses while vacationing, or ???

walking2lose
11-17-2008, 10:24 PM
I wonder if my exerience is typical or atypical? Do optometrists generally give you your prescription and say go find them wherever. I really got the impression at this office that the thing to do was buy them there. Maybe I just needed to be aware that I have other options. I will certainly be inquiring at my appt. Wed.

All of this is good to know... thanks again, gals!

JulieJ08
11-17-2008, 10:32 PM
They would like you to buy them there, for profit reasons. But it is nothing out of the ordinary to ask for a prescription. If you feel uncomfortable, you could always say you need to save up for few weeks. And regardless of where you buy your glasses or contacts, you should have your prescription anyway, so that you can replace them easily even if you're not in town. This is especially true for contacts, as often an optometrist's office in any city will have your prescription in stock.

PhotoChick
11-17-2008, 10:35 PM
My optometrist has always given me a prescription and sent me on my way. I can order through them, but I never have.

.

Optical Goddess
11-17-2008, 10:46 PM
Your Rx is your property, you can get it filled wherever you want.

Talk to your OD about contacts. Multi-focal or mono-vision contacts are ok, but not the same clarity as glasses in both distance and near.

I am a huge proponent of educating patients. I'll honestly tell you the pros and cons of different progressive designs, lens materials, frames, lens treatments, whatever.

If a pt wants to get thier glasses online, from walmart or from a crackerjack box, that's their business, as long as they are educated and understand exactly what they are getting and what to expect. Every type of optican from boutiques to walmart has it's place in the industry.

Any optician worth his/her salt will be honest with the patient, with more stress on pt education than selling them something they don't need.. Any decent office will have no issue with giving you your script, if they don't offer it first.

2fat2bphat
11-18-2008, 09:33 AM
I've worn glasses forever! Cant do the contacts any longer and have just 'graduated' to bi-focals. I have my expensive ($600) glasses from optomotrist (wouldnt trust anyone else to do these) but probably have about 8 pairs single vision from Zenni. Love them because they are so cheap, and if bored you can change your 'wardrobe' often. Word to the wise though on sunglasses - my first pair was the darkest black they offer - hate them (but at -$30 complete, who cares). Too hard to focus when driving. My next pair was 1 step down in coloring - LOVE them!

Optical Goddess
11-18-2008, 09:36 AM
Consider polarized lenses in sunwear ( if you haven't already), they will do a lot more with glare than tinted lenses alone.

Studies show that patients preffer a lighter colored lens with polarization vrs. a tinted lens, which is made like an easter egg.

anastasia
11-18-2008, 09:51 AM
you dont need new frames, just lenses so just ask how much to have new lenses made and put in to the old frames. it'l be almost half the rpice.

and yes, you do have the right to take your script and go elsewhere

2fat2bphat
11-18-2008, 10:02 AM
Optical Goddess - Great point. About 15yrs ago I had a pair of Serrangetti's (Sp?) and even though the lenses were great, the metal frames were awful. The reflection on my face was horrible. I always joke that I'm going to pull a michael jackson - when my nose falls off after all the sunburns I've experienced! Wont be a joke when that happens!! I now only wear plastic or rimless. I also own a pair of photograys (I think they're called something else these days. Where the lens changes from light to dark). I like those when I'm walking in the evening - start out in the sun, get home at dusk.

Optical Goddess
11-18-2008, 10:16 AM
I hate buying shoes, clothes, purses, makeup...but I love glasses. I have metal, zyl ( plastic ), rimless, semi-rimless.

Plastics can be sweet if they fit properly. If they don't fit well through the bridge of the nose, they're not going to. We cannot adjust the molded nose pieces on a plastic frame.

Photogreys usually reffer to glass photochromic lenses. Transitions or Life Rx are plastic photochromic lenses. I have a pair for out and about, walking stuff like that.

There's a type of sunlens out now that changes 3 different shades based on the lighting situation you're in. They also change behind the windshield which normal transitions/photochromics don't do. They're also polarized.

Unfortunately, polarized lenses cannot be totally clear to work, and transitions wont' work when driving. If they were made to darken behind the wheel when driving, they'd end up changing all the time, indoors and out

2fat2bphat
11-18-2008, 11:09 AM
Optical Goddess - Agree with you on hating to buy everything you listed - EXCEPT- shoes. You must convert!!!!(but they can keep the heels!)

alinnell
11-18-2008, 11:34 AM
I believe optometrists and ophthalmologists are required by law to give you a copy of your prescription. You can take it ANYWHERE to be filled. You can get discount frames for a lot less money--they are usually "last year's" fashion, but with glasses it's hard to tell the difference.

cbmare
11-18-2008, 12:39 PM
The one thing that is concerning me about my glasses is my vision after working at the computer for an hour. My eyes cross. They don't do it with my contacts. Also, my contacts are set with 1 for distance and 1 near. I've complained about my eyes crossing with 2 different doctors but they neither one addressed it. I guess I'll have to be a bit more firm next year when I go back.

walking2lose
11-18-2008, 07:17 PM
Hi Ladies,

Great to see the thread is still going... I'm learning!

Optical - it's great to have your input here. Would you mind helping a clueless soul with a couple of things? First, what's an OD? And optometrist vs. opthamologist... what's the difference? I know I should know that! Finally, are you an eye doc? What kind?

Ok, today I did a little research. 39dollars.com was sounding like a really sweet deal, but they don't do progressive lenses. The Zenni site looks pretty cool, but then I came across some controversies on the Clark Howard website. He recommends them, but some folks are steamed that they are being cranked out in China, taking away jobs from Americans. I hate to think about an impoverished child making my cheap glasses (not that that is necessarily the case) I've got to think about how I feel about that before I order.

Then, there are my concerns that somehow my lenses won't come out right, and I don't think any online site would take returns. I had never heard of a PD until today. I kept coming across it in my reading, and it appears to be a problem sometimes with ordering accurately online. I sure know I can't measure my own accurately, but I assume that will be part of my prescription tomorrow.

About just getting the lenses changed... While I don't need new frames, I would like to have new ones, mainly because I am just tired of the ones I have.

I have decided to be frank with my doc tomorrow. I'm going to let her know that I'm not flush with money (this is true, as my husband and I are both working extra to pay off some debt that is weighing down on us), and $375 was a real surprise. I'm going to let her know that I'm considering ordering online or maybe from WalMart and let her know that I still may take the option of ordering from her if I need to. Perhaps she will give me some advice, but if not, at least I will be up front with her.

I wish I didn't have to get the darned progressive lenses. It seems it would be easier if I just had one lens to deal with. Ah, well...

walking2lose
11-18-2008, 07:22 PM
Oh, my. I just found this blog, and it's very informative. Here it is if you're interested... I'm going to go back to reading it now :D

http://www.43folders.com/2007/11/29/adventures-40-eyeglasses

cbmare
11-18-2008, 08:54 PM
Like I said before, reuse your frames if you can. That should help.

alinnell
11-19-2008, 11:33 AM
Claire~your doctor can take your PD and put it on your prescription. It's a VERY simple measurement and he probably does it anyway--just make sure he writes it on the prescription. (PD = pupillary distance--the distance between your pupils, so when the glasses are made the center of each lens is in line with each pupil more or less).

Optical Goddess
11-19-2008, 11:56 AM
I would love to answer any questions about optics/glasses.

OD or DO: Doctor of Optometry= Optometrist
MD- Ophthalmologist/medical Dr.

Ophthalmologists are great for treatment of advanced eye diseases and surgeries. Many are specialised into parts of the eye ( retinal, corneal etc)

Optometrists do not operate, but they do many of the same things ophthalmologists do in terms of disease treatment.

There's also a hand ful of drugs that OD's cannot prescribe while MD's can.

Optometrists have more training when it comes to refraction. This is the part of the exam where the Dr. is achieving the prescription for glasses. Ophthalmologists do not have as much stress on this in thier training.

I'm an optician, have been for about 10 years.

I won't get into the politics of buying online and American jobs being lost ( totally another thread on another board), but there is the issue of returns and such.

Patients will ask me questions about online vendors ( will they do it right? Can I return it? ) that's not my decision to make, it's up to the vendor.

If you do get glasses online and there is something incorrect, an office can help figure out the error but they won't fix it with out charge in most cases because it wasn't purchased from them. Why spend cost and labor to fix someone else's mistake for free? Buying online is like the fast food of optics. It's ok. It has it's place, but it's not the highest quality workmanship and materials. The difference in price between a physical store and an online one isn't all due to costs of running a physical shop.

Online's ok for simple prescriptions, nothing too challenging. If you have prism or a high rx, or high cyl ( astigmatism), just be aware.

Atleast if you get them from Walmart or wherever you have a place you can go back to if there's issues w/ the rx or fit. It's good to work with one or two specific people, get a name and face that you can go to.

PD= Pupilary Distance. Distance between pupils. Have an optician measure this . The measurement the Dr takes in the examining room is done by the phoroptor. If the pt moves at all it's off, and people aren't all symmetrical as the one number indicates. it should be two seperate numbers, one for each eye. there's also near and far pd. Looking into the mirror and dotting your lenses isn't always accurate. If this measurement is off even by a few millimeters, it can really throw off how your lens works ( induced prism). It's a simple measurement, true, but if it's not done right, it _does_ make a difference.

this isn't part of your script. It can be added, but it's doesn't legally have to be provided.

As far as using your own frame, this usually isn't an issue if the frame's in good shape. If it's corroded, if the plastic is brittle or it's just jacked to high heaven, you should be informed of the risks, that the lab isn't responsible if it breaks blah blah blah.

It's fairly common for people to reuse thier frames. Find out if you have give up your frame. Many offices are able to have lens blanks on hand or ordered, then cut at the office, drastically reducing the amount of time a pt's with out thier frame.

We appreciate it when patient's are honest with us. it allows us to both educate the pt as well as offer any discounts or specials we may have in our office before they go to another. We do understand that people do what they have to do, but also we don't see every patient as a sale.

Also, NOT ALL PROGRESSIVE LENSES ARE EQUAL! Like anything else, there's a lot of varying degrees of quality and technology. There's over 300 types of progressives. Some work better for office work, others for driving. it's a matter of matching the pt up with the lens that will fit thier needs the best. And it's not always the newest thing out. Some old school lenses are popular not because they're less money but because they work great.

Hi Ladies,

Great to see the thread is still going... I'm learning!

Optical - it's great to have your input here. Would you mind helping a clueless soul with a couple of things? First, what's an OD? And optometrist vs. opthamologist... what's the difference? I know I should know that! Finally, are you an eye doc? What kind?

Ok, today I did a little research. 39dollars.com was sounding like a really sweet deal, but they don't do progressive lenses. The Zenni site looks pretty cool, but then I came across some controversies on the Clark Howard website. He recommends them, but some folks are steamed that they are being cranked out in China, taking away jobs from Americans. I hate to think about an impoverished child making my cheap glasses (not that that is necessarily the case) I've got to think about how I feel about that before I order.

Then, there are my concerns that somehow my lenses won't come out right, and I don't think any online site would take returns. I had never heard of a PD until today. I kept coming across it in my reading, and it appears to be a problem sometimes with ordering accurately online. I sure know I can't measure my own accurately, but I assume that will be part of my prescription tomorrow.

About just getting the lenses changed... While I don't need new frames, I would like to have new ones, mainly because I am just tired of the ones I have.

I have decided to be frank with my doc tomorrow. I'm going to let her know that I'm not flush with money (this is true, as my husband and I are both working extra to pay off some debt that is weighing down on us), and $375 was a real surprise. I'm going to let her know that I'm considering ordering online or maybe from WalMart and let her know that I still may take the option of ordering from her if I need to. Perhaps she will give me some advice, but if not, at least I will be up front with her.

I wish I didn't have to get the darned progressive lenses. It seems it would be easier if I just had one lens to deal with. Ah, well...

walking2lose
11-19-2008, 10:15 PM
Optical, thanks for the great and very thorough response! I am really learning.

Well, my plan today didn't go as I'd hoped. The girls working the desk a former student of mine) immediately started showing me frames before I even went back for my exam. I took that opportunity to say, I may not even be able to buy them until the Dec. paycheck because we are having a tough month. She immediately pulled 2 frames she thought would look good on my and showed me that they were only $49.00 (their lowest sale frame).When I asked about my lenses, she looked them up and did some calculating. The lowest she could quote me was $207.00, and that's just for replacing lenses and keeping the old frames! $200 just for a lense, even progressive seems so expensive to me.

Ok, I gotta go get this phone call ... I will tell you know that I didn't get my pd!

walking2lose
11-29-2008, 01:29 PM
Hello ladies- Thanks again for all of the great advice regarding ordering glasses online.

I have a question for Optical Goddess-- or any of you-- and would love your opinions - I went to Wal-Mart and got my PD- 32 in right, 31 in left. I asked the optician for my near and far, and she said this is all you need. I insisted that I thought I needed near and far, and she said, well this is all I can tell you from this machine (the binocular type thing). She said you'll have to talk to the other guy for more info. They were really busy, so I just left.

I'm just wondering - did I get the near or far? Do I indeed need to get another PD measurement taken, or is just the one sufficient to order glasses?

My prescription is mild (even though I'm not even sure what it all means!):
sphere cylinder axis add
OD -0.25 -0.50 028 +1.50
OS -0.25 -0.50 172 +1.50

So, I have decided to take the plunge and order a pair online and see how they work out. I am a bit concerned because I don't have both pd measurements and also because I wear progressives (they may well not work out). Still, I am very motivated to at least give online a shot, as my husband and I are both working extra jobs right now to pay down a rather large credit card debt -- not for frivolous things, but debt nonetheless -- and I'm just having a hard time coughing up the money my optometrist wants (207.00 just for lenses - that's without new frames). I do realize it's a risk, so I am hoping for the best.

Have any of you who bought online purchased progressive lenses? I would be interested to hear how that worked out.

Anyway, thanks again to ALL for the helpful advice. And if anyone knows the answer to my PD question, I'd love to know before I order.

Oh, I just thought of one more question - what other things should I be doing to take care of my eye health? Again, any tips welcome!

walking2lose
11-29-2008, 04:52 PM
I thought of one more question I meant to ask... for anyone who has purchased prescription sunglasses online, were you able to find polarized? I would prefer those, as I know they offer more protection, but all the sites seem to offer UV - question? Is that the same as polarized??

I won't be buying both glasses and sunglasses this month (again because of my $ issues), but I do hope to in the future so am interested in a good site.

Thanks!

Optical Goddess
11-29-2008, 06:58 PM
Hello,

I hope I answer all your questions:

- Near and Far PD. Near pd generally 1.5 mm less than far ( per eye ), I say generally because it's a 'rule of thumb' measurement when we aren't able to specifically measure the near pd as well as the far. You probably got far, since that's a default.

The near pd, when it comes to multifocals, comes into play with lined bifocals.It has to do with where the bifocal is, in terms of right to left, it has to be placed where you can use it, and it's not just below the eye.

I will say that I'd recommend leaving progressives to the pros. They are very touchy and your experience with them all comes down to measurements and what type of progressive to use ( out of over 300 different kinds ), they're not the same !

This isn't like buying a shirt or shoes. It's your sight, so make your decisions wisely. I'm saying this because we have had a number of patients come in upset that thier glasses they got online don't work, they can't use thier intermediate area or use the progressive for driving. And unfortunately, for me to order lenses to fix the problem, I'm not doing it for free.

I work hard at what I do, I am always learning and trying my best to improve myself and what I can offer patients. A web site with multiple choice questions and instructions about looking in a mirror to measure your bifocal heights isn't the same. Progressives and lined multifocals are a far cry than single vision.

Many people think that there's a measurement that just works for progressives on any person, which isn't true. Sight is very important, and just like buying anything else, just because it's less or more $ doesn't mean it's better or worse.

If you get progressives online and are successful, then good on you, but be aware that the progressive is an involved lens. It does a lot and if it's jacked up, it messes up all areas of the vision.

A note about frames: Zyl ( plastic ) frames normally don't have nose pads, but rather a saddle bridge, which is like molded nose pads. These cannot be adjusted. If you have a narrow bridge it may rest lower on your face, where the bridge of your nose planes out--the widest part. If you have a wider bridge, it may cause the frame to sit farther forward on your face, farther from your eyes. This can effect how well you see ( You see more out of a window when you're closer to it, than from a farther distance). If it fits great across your nose, it's comfortable, then it can be great.

Metal frames generally have nose pads which can be adjusted for optimum fit and comfort. Yes, nose pads do allow us to move the frame higher or lower, which can tweak your progressive or single vision lens. We can adjust a lot, but not everything can be acheived through adjustment-- alot can, but not all. The measurements on frames that determine the distance between lenses doesn't dictate how it's going to fit. Watch for temple length too, the part that goes over the ear. Make sure it's long enough or it can be annoying and ill fitting.

Polarization is not the same as uv protection. Polarization is used in sunglasses, there's no such thing as clear polarized lenses.

UV protection can be a coating, or part of some types of lens materials. This won't change color or do anything outside, it won't effect how you see light, but it will protect you. Its like sunscreen for your eyes. You can't tell you have it on, but it does protect you.

For sunglasses, it is preffered by most patients to regular tinting. Darker lenses don't do a heck of a lot for glare, that's where polarrized comes in.

Yeah, it's probably obvious I'm not a huge proponent of online eyeglasses, but I will honestly give you the best answers I can, because while I don't agree, I also want you ( or anyone ) to get the best they can.

--also, it keeps me "on top of my game".

walking2lose
11-29-2008, 08:39 PM
Optical - I appreciate very much your taking the time to respond so thoroughly to my MANY questions and also for being so candid. You can tell from all of my questions that I do feel ambivalent ordering online - mainly because of the risk of getting glasses that aren't right for me, but also because I understand it takes business away from local businesses and optometrists/opticians. I do get where you are coming from! It seems though that somehow online ordering will become more and more the future of eyeglasses, and maybe optical stores will modify how they do business (like maybe offering a form of online ordering through their shops and charging a set fee for things like adjustments and giving out PD's, etc.). That's just my thought, since although there are problems with online ordering, the cost difference is so vast, and people are always needing/wanting to save $$.

I will say your perspective is making me rethink my decision somewhat - I will probably sleep on it a few more days now and maybe I will just take in my frames and get the 207.00 lenses. I don't know (I'm such an indecisive person!). However, I must admit, if I had a single vision lens, I would order online in a heartbeat though, just because of the sheer cost savings.

Anyway, THANK YOU again for sharing your expertise and your perspective with me. I'll give you an update once I get something!

Optical Goddess
11-29-2008, 09:42 PM
I'll try to keep this short and not get myself worked up.

People form thier opinions based on personal experiences, both good and bad. Of course, I am impacted personally by online retailers, but not in the negative fashion some may think.

My issue isn't that my career may go the way of the haberdasher, but even 10 years from now, I can't tell you that your glasses will fit, if the measurements are correct or be able to trouble shoot by looking at a print out order from a faceless patient. To be done accurately, I'd need to see the patient with the frame on. Not everything can be automated.

To use an optical example: flat top bifocals have been around since Ben Franklin. They're still around, even with all the new stuff out there. You know why? They still work.

At my office, patients can order contacts from us on our web site.

Contacts are like bottled beer. No matter where you go, bottled beer is the same.

Glasses are like mixed drinks. What it tastes like depends on the skill of the bartender.

That's all I'm going to say about online ordering, because I'll go off on a tangent that will never end.

Just check out warranties, the fine print, stuff like that. Be educated on what you're spending money on...what if you don't adapt? What time line do they allow? If you need to go with a line, is there a charge? Will you get the difference in cost? Will a line work in all areas that a progressive does? What if the frame breaks? What if it doesn't fit well when you receive it? what about coatings/options?

if you have questions about frames, progressives, lens materials, options-- I love answering questions.

I will say that most brick and mortar optical shops will adjust glasses for free,but any warranty work will have to be handled through the vendor.

Obviously, we're going to do more for the patient whose business we have than someone who just wants us to do what can't be done online.

Ok-- I'm done. I'll keep my replies strictly optical... at least it's a given that if I get so nerdy about posting on a forum, I am equally nerdy with my career.

walking2lose
11-29-2008, 10:42 PM
Being nerdy about your career shows passion. I'm an English teacher, although I realize it doesn't show from most of my rushed posts. I can be equally impassioned when discussing a topic like why texting jargon doesn't belong in an essay. At any rate, I see your "nerdiness" as a reflection of the passion you have for what you do -- it shows.

Again, I am learning, and I do feel like I understand the ins and outs of buying glasses much more than I did 2 weeks ago. I do hope I haven't irked you too much.

JulieJ08
11-30-2008, 12:40 PM
I need to get some new glasses and contacts, I just procrastinate so much :dizzy:

But ... I just wanted to say a huge thank you to Optical Goddess. You have gone way above and beyond and really blessed us with your time!

Optical Goddess
11-30-2008, 01:01 PM
The pleasure's mine.

I love answering questions, be it about optics or those email/myspace./facebook surveys that go around.

I'm very happy that I can help people out!

walking2lose
11-30-2008, 02:37 PM
Wish I could find a cool optician like you! :cool:

tamaralynn
12-01-2008, 07:57 AM
I get my eyes tested at and buy my glasses from either Walmart or The Real Canadian Superstore - May be called President's Choice in US (but I heard Costco has good deals as well)