20-Somethings - A day of water?




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CatRocks
09-18-2008, 04:22 AM
I'm desperate to get my weight loss on the go again and have read various places that a day of just drinking water can kick start it again. Does anyone recommend this or is it a bad idea :?:
Cat
x


mxgirl737
09-18-2008, 04:45 AM
My dad also believes in this...and he has lost a considerable amount of weight by drinking a lot of water.

You have to be careful not to get too much water though...it can throw your electrolytes way off and screw up your system big time.

Iconised Ghost
09-18-2008, 04:45 AM
I wouldnt recommend it. I havent read about it, but i dont see how it would help. Maybe drinking a lot of water with your food for a while would help, but water alone...i'm skeptical. Doesnt sound like a whole lot of fun either


Lovely
09-18-2008, 07:02 AM
I'm desperate to get my weight loss on the go again and have read various places that a day of just drinking water can kick start it again. Does anyone recommend this or is it a bad idea :?:
Cat
x

I'd really caution against a day of nothing but water. Quite honestly, you're more likely to set yourself up for a binge-type-day the next day simply because your body is craving the calories.

PhotoChick
09-18-2008, 10:26 AM
Sounds like a "fast" by any other name.

Fasts don't work for weight loss. All you're doing is setting yourself up to be STARVING - and possibly not even on the next day, but by the end of the same day.

You've lost 5lbs and that's a great start. Just keep eating healthy and get some exercise, if you're not already. You'll get there.

This isn't a sprint to the finish, you know. :) It's all about your life.

.

junebug41
09-18-2008, 10:38 AM
I'd really caution against a day of nothing but water. Quite honestly, you're more likely to set yourself up for a binge-type-day the next day simply because your body is craving the calories.

While I have read a lot of literature (of a more "organic" nature;)) advocating one day a week fasting, I think this is a fine line. It isn't intended to jump start weightloss, but for mind clarity and to "rest" the digestive system. Raw foodies in particular advocate this. But I think if you aren't educated on the subject it can turn into a bad cycle. I had a friend lose weight by no-holds-barred eating for a couple of days followed by fasting (which I think technically is a form of bullimia). She now weighs more than when she started. In general, not eating is not an acceptable form of weightloss or maintenance.

My dad also believes in this...and he has lost a considerable amount of weight by drinking a lot of water.

You have to be careful not to get too much water though...it can throw your electrolytes way off and screw up your system big time.

My dad also practices it, but I think he follows the premise of fasting for health, something he learned from Joel Fuhrman (Fasting and Eating for Health). He has never struggled with his weight, though.

Shannon1983
09-18-2008, 11:55 AM
I thought it was never good to drink more then 108 ounces of water a day? i know im totally no expert but it does not sound healthy at all to drink water like that.

PhotoChick
09-18-2008, 12:14 PM
I thought it was never good to drink more then 108 ounces of water a day? i know im totally no expert but it does not sound healthy at all to drink water like that.I'm not sure where you got the 108 oz figure from, but I've never heard that. I also drink at least a gallon of water a day myself, which is 128 oz, and usually I drink a little more.

There's no hard and fast rule about how much you shoudl drink really. It's all individual and it depends on your health, your exercise levels, if you're on any meds, etc.

I know that I do quite nicely on about a gallon a day. OTOH, I have a friend who takes heart meds and she can't drink more than about 60 oz of water a day.

.

JulieJ08
09-18-2008, 12:24 PM
I thought it was never good to drink more then 108 ounces of water a day? i know im totally no expert but it does not sound healthy at all to drink water like that.

LOL, then I guess I'm in trouble. I pretty much have to refill my 1.13 gallon (144 oz) Brita pitcher every day :D I don't actually use the entire volume before refilling it, but I just use at least 75% + of it (108 oz). And that's only the water I drink/use at home.

Here we go again
09-18-2008, 01:23 PM
I thought it was never good to drink more then 108 ounces of water a day? i know im totally no expert but it does not sound healthy at all to drink water like that.

I drink 4 to 5 liters everyday. Not all at once but through out the entire day. 5 liters is 169 oz. and 4 liters is 135.20.

I've only heard if you drink a lot of water all at once that you can have problems and when I say a lot I mean like a gal.

sh3l5
09-18-2008, 02:47 PM
i drink almost 4 litres of water a day....
as well as eating my meals....
i believe it helps to carb cravings but cud never manage on water alone....
stick to it, it will boost soon....

kaplods
09-18-2008, 04:59 PM
It really is very individual as to how much water is too much water. If you're on a blood pressure medication, I'd recommend asking your doctor, before drinking more than 3 quarts.

My mom was drinking about a gallon of liquids daily (counting coffee, which does absolutely count as water). She was drinking it throughout the day, not all at once, and she was hospitalized for water poisoning - and it permanently damaged her kidneys. She and I are both on the same blood pressure medication, for mild to moderate high blood pressure, but we both tend toward low blood sodium levels, because of the medication and because we don't eat much dietary salt (we're one of the few people on the planet who have doctors recommending that we add a bit of salt to our diet once in a while). My family just never did have salt on the table, and didn't use it much in cooking either. For as long as I can remember, my mother always told me when making a recipe that "only bread" needed salt, so to always eliminate or cut the salt in any other recipe.

Her kidney specialist that was called in, told her that no one, except athletes should ever "need" more than 2 or at most 3 quarts of liquid under most circumstances, but that most people could handle more, but the low salt diet and the blood pressure medication each reduced the amount of water her body could tolerate. She was put on a 2 liter limit for quite awhile, and when her kidneys had recovered to about 60% of normal (where they'll probably remain), her limit has been raised to 3 liters, and that includes coffee, soup, water, watermelon, milk, and even beer. He said the only beverage that can cause more dehydration than the water it provides would be very high proof alcohol (so even a mixed drink, for example, would contribute to your fluid needs for the day). So coffee definitely "counts" as water, as he pointed out if coffee was as dehydrating as some people claim, that anyone who drinks only coffee would quickly die of dehydration (and they don't) and in the middle ages, everyone even children in many cities drank only beer and sometimes cows milk, never "plain" water, because the water wasn't safe to drink.

walking2lose
09-18-2008, 07:05 PM
Colleen, I was just telling my students today that the Pilgrims even gave their children beer -- the eleventh graders loved that!

My water fluctuates depending on how thirsty I am, which of course is dictated by the weather and exercise. I think most days I get my 64 ounces; I am amazed at those of you who get 100+ ounces DAILY. Wow.

Shannon in ATL
09-18-2008, 07:58 PM
I have no problem getting 75-85 ounces on an exercise day, but on non-exercise days I fight to even get 64... Right now I'm only at 55 ounces... That 24 oz bottle during exercise really kicks it off! I have learned that if I don't drink enough water I feel bloated the next day...

raw23
09-18-2008, 08:17 PM
There is an interesting article on water consumption at:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/6263029.stm

The mayo clinic also has an article on the subject. It says The Institute of Medicine advises that men consume roughly 3.0 liters (about 13 cups) of total beverages a day and women consume 2.2 liters (about 9 cups) of total beverages a day.
To determine how much water you need:
http://www.cnn.com/HEALTH/library/NU/00283.html

Calculator:
http://www.hydroxycut.com/calculators/water.shtml

So, basically... several liters of water a day can cause problems; it will mess with your electrolytes, over work your kidneys, swell your brain, and possibly lead to death. If you do this "fast," dont drink too much water and dont expect any permanent weight loss.

kaplods
09-18-2008, 08:32 PM
Um that hydroxycut calculator says I should have 27 cups of water per day - that would be a great deal more than enough to kill me according to my mom's kidney specialist. Since I'm on the same meds as she was on, and have the same tendency towards low blood levels of sodium, he told me that 3 quarts (12 cups) would be safe, but that 4 quarts or more (16 cups) could push me into the danger zone.

I'm not sure that 27 cups of water would be safe for a woman of my weight, even without the blood pressure medications, or low sodium levels.

raw23
09-18-2008, 08:34 PM
hmm... well maybe thats not such a good one :)
I think what they are programmed to do is half your body weight in ounces. At some weights it wouldn't be healthy to go by that rule.

kaplods
09-18-2008, 08:42 PM
Ah, Mom's kidney specialist was telling us he didn't like the half ounce per lb of body weight "formula" because he said it has very little basis in fact. An overweight person's kidneys don't have a larger capacity than they would if the person were thin (as you gain weight, you don't gain extra kidney function), so the idea that a bigger person has bigger kidneys only works if the people in question aren't overweight. A bigger person can have more blood volume, so that could slow down the dilution of the blood somewhat, so an overweight person might be able to drink a little more water safely, than a thin person of the same height, but not much more.

raw23
09-18-2008, 08:48 PM
I agree with you. That rule is probably just for people at normal/smaller weights. I didn't realize that calc. was going by that rule until I entered in some higher weights.

JulieJ08
09-18-2008, 10:51 PM
Um that hydroxycut calculator says I should have 27 cups of water per day - that would be a great deal more than enough to kill me according to my mom's kidney specialist. Since I'm on the same meds as she was on, and have the same tendency towards low blood levels of sodium, he told me that 3 quarts (12 cups) would be safe, but that 4 quarts or more (16 cups) could push me into the danger zone.

I'm not sure that 27 cups of water would be safe for a woman of my weight, even without the blood pressure medications, or low sodium levels.

Your mom, however, is older than you, and probably has less kidney function. It decreases with age. So even with the same meds, you should be able to drink more than her. In general.

PhotoChick
09-18-2008, 11:04 PM
I'm not sure that 27 cups of water would be safe for a woman of my weight, even without the blood pressure medications, or low sodium levels.

27 cups of water - if you go by what a "cup" is, or 8 oz - is 216 oz or a hair more than 1.5 gallons. I drink that fairly often actually, with no ill effects. I average about a gallon a day, but some days drink more. (That includes water, coffee, diet soda, etc.) But then I work out pretty intensely almost every day, and I sweat A LOT when I work out.

I do think this is another one of those very personal things that each person has to determine for herself, based on her health situation.

.

But then

kaplods
09-19-2008, 12:06 AM
Your mom, however, is older than you, and probably has less kidney function. It decreases with age. So even with the same meds, you should be able to drink more than her. In general.
__________________________________________________ ___________

Those were the limits the kidney specialist gave me for me (seperate from my mom). Because I was on the same medications I was concerned for myself, and those were the limits he gave based on my situation, not my mom's. At the time mom had a 2 liter limit, and he gave me a 3 liter limit. Mom's limit was raised to 3 liters when she'd regained some of the kidney function after the damage caused by the water poisoining. He said that I might be able to drink a gallon safely (and I often do), but said he wasn't going to recommend that I do it regularly. Also, I've made sure that my husband knows the symptoms of water intoxication as well as I do, so the likelihood is that I would be able to immediately eat some salt and/or head to the ER if needed. I'm not paranoid, just prepared.

So while we have the same limit now, I imagine if we were the same weight, took the same dose of high blood pressure medication, and had the same blood sodium levels, that I might have a higher tolerance than my mom, but we have the same recommendations probably because

while I'm 20 years younger, I weigh 100 lbs more than she does
Our blood pressure medications/dosages are somewhat different
(apparently it's not the severity of the blood pressure, but the potassium sparing nature of the blood pressure medication which puts you at greater risk for losing too much sodium - the main cause of water intoxication. While we share one blood pressure medication, we both take two different medications. My doses are lower than hers, as is my blood pressure with and without the meds, but perhaps our second bp medicines affect the issue differently). And my blood sodium levels tend to be much lower than my mothers (I eat less salt/sodium than my mother, especially as she tends to rely more on a few more processed foods as she gets older). Mom's are well within her doctor's guideline in the normal range, but mine often run at the lowest range of normal, and sometimes even dip too low. In fact, I need to have my sodium levels checked before any surgery, because mine runs so low. The last time I had surgery, I had to take sodium supplements before surgery (as low blood sodium during surgery can cause a fatal heart attack).

My mom's situation isn't "normal," and mine is even less so, there aren't many people whose sodium levels run so extremely low. Because the average american diet has such an excess of sodium, the issue doesn't come up very often, but apparently it's occurring much more commonly than ever before. All of the reasons may be unclear, but mom's doctors said it was because of the increase in people on bp meds, and the increased water consumption.

The potassium-sparing (and thus sodium-leeching) blood pressure medications are among the most commonly prescribed, and because reducing dietary sodium is common for people trying to eat healthier or lose weight that contributes to the risk. Mom's doctor said he used to see only one or two cases a year, and then mostly during summer "marathon" season among marathon runners, now he sees many more cases, mostly associated with "dieting." He said while our medications and diet put us at particular risks, and we're both in the highest risk group, he's alarmed at how often he's seeing it in normal weight (mostly women) who aren't on meds (he said in med school they were taught that it was virtually impossible for a person to overdose on water unless they were basically an extreme athlete, addicts trying to pass a drug test by diluting their urine, or schizophrenics with OCD with a compulsion to drink water excessively - it's what I learned in college, and what I taught in community college health and psychology classes).

It just turns out, it's alot more complicated than that.

My biggest concern on the issue, is that water intoxication symptoms are so vague, that often by the time a person knows something is VERY wrong, their life is often already in danger. My mom thought she had the flu, and it was only because my dad (a former ENT) noticed that she wasn't making sense (had become confused) and her words were slurring that he called the ambulance. If he had waited even a few minutes (20 minutes to an hour, the hospital staff told us), she probably would have died. The symptoms came on suddenly, and she was treated quickly, and she was still in the hospital for an entire week.

NishKitten
09-19-2008, 11:02 AM
I alternate plain ice water along with water mixed with lemon, cayenne pepper, and two tablespoons of maple syrup on days when I don't feel like eating (clears out the system, as in #2) and on days after i've been out partying a little too hard, or if i've smoked cigarettes, or just ate too much/something funny/too heavy the day before and gave myself indigestion.

I also continue my normal exercise routine and try to do things so i'll sweat a little more like wearing a full sweat suit or something. Then in the evening i'll eat light if I feel up to it and go right back to my normal routine the next day.

I don't know if it actually does anything, but for me it gets rid of hangovers, constipation, and clears up any crud when I feel like i'm coming down with a cold or flu. In those cases, I drink the nasty lemon and syrup mixture hot with a quarter shot of bourbon. Seems to ward it off and clears up my nose.

e32
09-20-2008, 05:26 AM
the weight loss experienced during a "water fast" is not permanent.

some people believe that fasting helps cleanse the body and make a fresh start.

personally, i know it is not healthy for me to fast, nor is it healthy to overeat (as i would want to, after a fast)--due to past issues with eating...

i'm not here to say fasting is bad, but i know it's not a viable option for me.

if you want to continue losing weight...be patient. drink water. eat healthfully. exercise.

you will see results!

good luck!

take care,
ella