100 lb. Club - Self-Made Rules




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Lyn2007
08-20-2008, 01:47 AM
Do any of you make up rules for yourself to help you with your weight loss? If so, how do you get yourself to stick to them? I have been thinking about making some rules for myself. Maybe, "no eating in the car" or "NO fast food" or something along those lines. But just thinking, "okay, this is a rule now" is not very effective. How do you make it something you will abide by?


Pandora123a
08-20-2008, 02:09 AM
The book Slim Chance in a Fat World talks about how we are behaviorally triggered to eat...so if we eat in front of the tv the tv becomes a trigger to eat. My rules are pretty simple.

1) I only eat at the table or in the kitchen. (Okay, I am a taster when I am cooking.)

2) I don't eat in the car.

I make myself do it by making it harder for me to break the rule. I try to keep nice things or things I don't want to have food on at the couch (knitting, puzzles etc) to keep my hands busy. I keep my car clean to make it less likely that I "mess it up". (And I also don't allow others to eat in the car.)

I think I make it something that I will abide by by being absolutely rigid about it until it is a habit...and by not trying to set rules that are unliveable for me. (No food in front of the tv has been such a long time rule that I don't even think about it any more...although I am sometimes sorely tested about whether I want to watch tv or eat something.

There isn't an easy answer, as you know. Limiting the cues for me to eat has been helpful.

kaplods
08-20-2008, 02:37 AM
I set little games for myself (sticker charts and everything). It's childish - but I've never really grown up, and don't intend to.

It's like I've got multiple personalities (except they all live in my head quite happily, and all know each other), and if the adult Colleens (they're really outnumbered by all of the children Colleens) try to enforce too many rules, the children Colleens all throw tantrums.

Ok, that sounds alot crazier than it really is, but when I try to force myself into rigid rules, I rebel against myself (nope, that doesn't sound any less crazy).

We'll shut up now.


piper10
08-20-2008, 03:52 AM
I hate rules too (I think it's that "demand resistance" thing discussed in the book "Do It Now"). I can't stand counting anything or writing anything down. So I'm not following a diet -- just trying to make changes I can live with long term.

But my guidelines are few: 1. No sugar; 2. No eating between meals; 3. No junk food -- chips, fries, etc.; 4. No diet frankenfoods.

I stick to #1 because I have no "off" button where sugar is concerned. I remind myself of Proverbs 26:11: "As a dog returns to its vomit, so a fool repeats his foolishness." I look at chocolate cake and think "dog vomit."

I don't stick to #2 or #3 perfectly. But I don't kick myself...because I didn't break a rule -- I just didn't do as well as I would have liked. So I try again. ("They may trip seven times, but each time they will rise again." - Prov. 24:16a)

#4 has not been a problem.

I'm losing very slowly this way, but I'm committed. And I'll make changes to my guidelines as necessary.

That's my two cents. :)

Mommysince21505
08-20-2008, 04:02 AM
I stay away from candy at the moment, but I don't have any rules. I allow myself to have one piece of candy if I am craving it. Although, I make room to add it into my calories for the day. So I only really have guidelines like how many calories I eat... As for eating in the car... I don't even do that

Beverlyjoy
08-20-2008, 07:07 AM
My one hard and fast rule is that I write down everything I eat - planned or unplanned. That's a huge reality check for me - and it says everything about my daily life with food. Hopefully, I learn from it...sometimes yes...sometimes, no.

Since I always write down my food...at the end of the day I draw myself a smiley face or frustrated face drawing in my journal. It's nice to rack up lots of smiley's at the end of the week/month.

Sea
08-20-2008, 08:30 AM
I have to stay away from caffeine. It took me 24 years of dieting to recognize that it is a super-trigger for my eating.

synger
08-20-2008, 09:29 AM
I used to graze a lot, getting a bite to eat when I started getting a headache, or edgy, or irritable. But it was never planned. It was reactive.

Now that I'm working on Radiant Recovery, I only eat meals and planned snacks at planned times. Because my blood sugar is more constant, and fueled by enough protein during mealtimes and snacks, I am much less tempted to snack at other times. It started out as a rule, but I find I'm just not interested in popcorn in the evening, or ice cream between lunch and dinner after we go to the library.

So "no unplanned snacks" is a rule, I guess. Or at least, it's how I'm living now.

Another one that has completely changed how I "do food" is the breakfast rule. I get breakfast, with adequate protein, within an hour of waking up. I used to wait through my commute and eat cottage cheese and fruit when I got to work, but that's like 3 hours after I wake up. Now I'm eating beforehand, and upping the protein. It's giving me a nice stable platform for the rest of the day. When my food is wobbly, my day gets wobbly. So I focus on a good solid breakfast first.

Redheaded I am
08-20-2008, 09:49 AM
I set little games for myself (sticker charts and everything). It's childish - but I've never really grown up, and don't intend to.

It's like I've got multiple personalities (except they all live in my head quite happily, and all know each other), and if the adult Colleens (they're really outnumbered by all of the children Colleens) try to enforce too many rules, the children Colleens all throw tantrums.

Ok, that sounds alot crazier than it really is, but when I try to force myself into rigid rules, I rebel against myself (nope, that doesn't sound any less crazy).

We'll shut up now.

Cool...I'm not the only one with a chorus in my head!!! :)

My big blanket rule is to NOT make any other big blanket rules. I tend to rebel against them, and have a hard time dealing with the "forever concept". I do much better with "I won't eat any Oreos today" and "Today I'll record everything I eat in FitDay". That keeps me on track. Forever I can't deal with. Today I can deal with.

~JoAnne

thistoo
08-20-2008, 09:53 AM
My only really big rules right now are these:

1) No sugar (I fall down on this one sometimes, but it's a goal I shoot for)
2) Record all my food for the day in Sparkpeople at the beginning of the day, or the night before. That makes it a lot easier to stick to my plan rather than grazing on cookies or whatever's on the counter at work.
3) Eat the majority of my carbs before 3:00 pm. This is the only way I can lose at all, thanks to my insulin resistance, so it's a rule I abide by.

Schmoodle
08-20-2008, 09:56 AM
I am a big rule makeer. I have a bunch of rules I've been making up as I go along to address bad behaviors. I live in a very small town and the PO, bank, municipal center, school, and tiny little market are all within about 5 blocks, as are many friends' houses, so one of the first rules I made for myself was to walk everywhere unless it is pouring rain (Yes, I am ashamed to admit I would drive the 2 blocks to the PO sometimes).

I also have a nut rule. I tend to over do the nuts, so I am not allowed to eat them alone as a snack unless I am going to be out of the house and can pre-portion. At home, I only use them as an ingredient in cooking.

I have an issue with overdoing the NSA fudgesicles, so I have a new rule that I am only allowed a new box of 12 every 10 days. Even if I am PMSing and go through the box in 4 days, I figure it will even out over time.

Once I identify an issue, I make a rule for it and once it is a rule, I seem more likely to comply. I am a person that functions better with structure, even self-imposed apparently. But there is no magic, you just have to commit, just like there is no magic to make you stick to the eating plan. I feel like I just never learned self control in this food area (obviously), and am now teaching it to myself in baby steps. Rewards for sticking to the rules might help. For me the reward is seeing those "green" on-plan days pile up and seeing results on the scale.

ladybugnessa
08-20-2008, 10:00 AM
have you read "the Beck Diet solution" it's about cognitive therapy and making your own rules and how to implement them.

eat sitting down
eat slowly
pay attention


behavior related rules can be hard and fast

food related rules that are rigid tend to be broken, make us feel like failures and continue to 'break the rules'

fiberlover
08-20-2008, 11:06 AM
Rules for me have to become habits. I need to write notes to myself when I want to change something, so that I have a concrete taskmaster, so to speak.

Rules like no tv in the evening until I have done x number of chores. So - I make a list of the things that need to be done before I can relax.

For weight loss, it's things like eating dinner at the table and not in the living room. That took practice to make the rule stick, but now it's a habit.

valpal23
08-20-2008, 11:12 AM
It's childish - but I've never really grown up, and don't intend to.

It's like I've got multiple personalities (except they all live in my head quite happily, and all know each other), and if the adult Colleens (they're really outnumbered by all of the children Colleens) try to enforce too many rules, the children Colleens all throw tantrums.

Ok, that sounds alot crazier than it really is, but when I try to force myself into rigid rules, I rebel against myself (nope, that doesn't sound any less crazy).

We'll shut up now.

lol!! I love the sticker idea - I'm going to have to try something like that. And you made perfect and complete sense kaplods. I was going to say something along the same lines. I have 'general rules' but when I focus too much on them I just break them.

Parveen
08-20-2008, 11:47 AM
My rule is if I can kill it or grow it then I can eat it!!! otherwise try not to eat it and if I am dying to eat it then I can have a small piece of it.

JulieJ08
08-20-2008, 12:29 PM
My most important rules are to eat slow and not eat until I'm stuffed. And resist the urge not graze all day long - I'm not talking about mini-meal every 3 or even 2 hours, I mean grazing all day long. Haven't done it since I started 4 1/2 months ago :D. Also, while I may be flexible enough to substitute a little yogurt, fruit and nuts for dinner when I'm just not very hungry for some reason, I will *not* just have a pint of ice cream or batch of cookies or bag of crackers for dinner. At this point, the urge is pretty easy to resist, but I could not say it is entirely gone.

FB
08-20-2008, 01:30 PM
My general rules/guidelines for me are pretty easy for me to follow.

1. Track and account for every single bite in Fitday.
2. Minimum 45 minutes a day dedicated to exercise.
3. Get the most out of my calories, in nutrition and volume.

This is a great post! I've also gradually placed a few family rules into effect, which helps tons.

Like eating in the car, I just don't, I never have. I'm sort of particular about my car and enjoying my food when I eat. My son isn't allowed to, therefore it's unreasonable for me to. We don't even drink in the car (as a matter of fact there are no cupholders in mine).

Same goes for other places, no eating in the living room, bedrooms, ect. Snacks are okay at my son's play/work table, but everything else is taken at the family table.

Fast food and restaurants are sometimes okay. We all need convenience now and then. But again, I don't want my son or husband eating that stuff often, it wouldn't be fair for me to do it.

My son and husband each pick out one treat when we grocery shop. This not only lessens temptations in the house but saves the grocery budget and helps my son to understand the difference between treats and real food. We all shop together to make 'healfy becisions' (healthy decisions) as my son calls it.

Sometimes placing 'light rules', nothing too restrictive on my guys, like good nutrition sense has helped me along. I need to be a good example.

When I was eating terribly and gaining weight I felt constant guilt over my son, what I was teaching him. By enforcing a few gentle family rules we've really benefited.

everanderson
08-20-2008, 08:44 PM
I agree with FB...this is a great post! My "rules" are as follows:

1. No pizza in the house
2. No chips in the house
3. Log everything that goes in the mouth to TDP
4. Learn to recognize the difference between hunger, fullness, and stuffed-ness

Numbers one and two are non-negotiable. I simply have no self-control and am not able to limit my serving size when it comes to these two things. I can eat a bag of chips for dinner...a family sized bag of doritos in one sitting. Same thing with pizza...I don't eat a few slices or heck, even half. I eat the whole thing, regardless as to the size of it. I've learned to recognize my triggers and banish them from my shopping cart!

Number 3 is relatively easy and the last one is a work-in-progress. For me, being stuffed WAS my definition of being "no longer hungry." This has been my toughest struggle, but I'm working my way through it.

skinnyinsideout
08-20-2008, 11:23 PM
Be CAREFUL! I find that when I start to make rules for myself I get discouraged when I break them - even if they are silly like no eating in the car. Then that discouragement is a slippery slope and I start thinking "well, I messed that up - might as well eat this _________ ", and that feeling of failure festers. I say cut yourself a break and look for ways to make it easy for yourself. Look for ways to allow yourself things - like keeping portioned healthy snacks available that you can have whenever you want. This dieting thing is hard enough, right??

kaplods
08-20-2008, 11:33 PM
I think if you're going to make rules for yourself (if you find that you must) then set them positively not negatively (rather than "I will not eat in the car," perhaps, "I will eat at a table"). That way, instead of feeling guilty when you don't follow your rule, you will feel pride when you do.

As I learned in behavioral psych, rewards tend to work better than punishments.

Tai
08-21-2008, 12:43 AM
I have a rule about eating my food very slowly and really enjoying the taste and texture. When I weighed 272 I ate so fast. This rule helps me feel like I'm nourishing and refueling my body, not just dieting.

I did give up both fast food and eating in my car, but it wasn't really a rule, more of a lifestyle change that I needed.

kaplods
08-21-2008, 01:36 AM
I was just thinking that although I've avoided "rules," I've embraced many, many "suggestions." And I'm thinking, well what is the difference?"

I guess for me, rules mean that I'm "supposed" to feel bad, if I can't or don't follow through. And more often than not, "rules" are things that are necessary, but NOT fun, in fact the antithesis of fun (don't jump on the bed, don't get dirty, clean your room....) Where suggestions are things I use to improve things in my life - make them easier, more enjoyable....

Like eating more slowly. It's not a rule, because rules by definition are "no fun." Whereas, even if I eat something that is maybe not the best choice, I better get every drop of enjoyment out of it by eating it very, very slowly, and concentrating on how wonderful the flavor is. I recently noticed that the "worse" a food is for my food plan, the faster I tend to eat it, and I think it goes back to my early childhood (and throughout my whole life time) that if I "shouldn't have it," I had to eat it quickly and hide the evidence as quickly as possible. And even when there was no one to hide the evidence from, it was as if I needed to eat it fast before I changed my mind.

Whereas now, if I can remember to eat EVERYTHING very slowly, and really concentrate on the wonderful flavor and texture and aroma of the food, I feel like I'm eating so much more and getting so much more enjoyment out of my food, than when I wasn't taking control of what I was eating. Even for less than perfect choices, I at least have a chance at realizing that I DON'T want to gorge myself.

And whether it starts out as a rule or a suggestion, if you do it enough, it starts to become a habit. I just thought of even better term than suggestion. From now on, I'm going to think of such behaviors as

Prospective Habits or Habits-in-training

midwife
08-21-2008, 10:17 AM
FB, I love the "healfy becisions"!

I have a few rules. No eating off the kids' plates. A cup of veggies with dinner. Protein everytime I eat.

I am not perfect, and I sometimes choose to not follow these rules. When I go of my plan, my rule is: get back on immediately. I do not "punish" myself or undereat or overexercise to make up for missteps. So that's another rule, I guess!

JulieJ08
08-21-2008, 01:14 PM
I was just thinking that although I've avoided "rules," I've embraced many, many "suggestions." And I'm thinking, well what is the difference?"

It's hard to say sometimes! I guess another way I think about "rules" is just as choices. I can choose to eat slowly, for example, for various good reasons. And I can choose to eat fast. There are reasons for that too.

They might have to do with temporary external circumstances. Maybe I just have to be in a hurry. That might at first seem to be a good excuse (assuming it's not a habitual excuse), but really, I'm still making a choice. I'm deciding that getting somewhere on time is more important than eating slowly. By being aware of that, I'm less likely to let that one time make me feel guilty and give up.

Or I might choose to eat fast because I'm tired of the work it takes to make new choices into habits, and I had a bad day, and I just miss stuffing my face. Sounds like a terrible reason. But it's not half as bad if I make the choice consciously, knowing how it will make me feel better and how it will make me feel worse - as opposed to just doing it out of mindless habit, and even consciously refusing to stop and think about the reasons. I think after making that choice consciously, I'm in a better place to afterwards stand back and look at how it turned out, both good and bad, and let that influence my next choice.

That kind of choice can be dangerous, to be sure. It's awfully hard to be in a place where that kind of choice doesn't derail you, but it's not necessarily impossible. I don't think it moves you in the right direction, but compared to the choices you used to make, it might move you in the wrong direction more slowly ;). And sometimes your only realistic choice is between moving in the wrong direction more slowly or taking a nosedive. We walk before we run.

But it's by having the "rule" (or whatever term may be better, and rule probably isn't the best word) in the first place, that you have the guidance and awareness to even approach a situation as a choice instead of mindlessly repeating history instead of changing it.

And it's by acknowledging the benefits of a "bad" choice that you can stop viewing it (and worse, your very self) as a black and white failure, and instead see it as a learning experience. And if you don't acknowledge that you did in fact make a choice, you take away your power to change.

KimL1214
08-21-2008, 01:55 PM
I really like the not eating in the car rule, since I tend to munch on random things while in the car (mainly salted sunflower seeds, bad, I know). I used to ALWAYS smoke while driving, so I think I've replaced smoking with more eating... so now that it's been almost 6 months since I quit, I think it's time to get rid of the bad habits when I quit the bad habit of smoking. Unfortunately we don't have a table in our apartment and have to eat in the living room if we want to sit while eating, any ideas about a rule to substitute with the TV one?

kaplods
08-21-2008, 02:11 PM
It was a strange example really, because we don't have a table either (though we do use tv trays, and hubby is always bugging me to TAKE a tv tray instead of balancing my plate on my lap - maybe he's got a point).

For me, it's about eating slowly and tasting my food. We do tend to eat watching tv, and I kept trying to say to hubby that we should turn the tv off while we eat, but that never seemed to work. So my focus is on paying more attention to the food than the tv, because when I focus on the show, it seems my plate is empty and I haven't really tasted what I ate.

WarMaiden
08-21-2008, 02:20 PM
The only hard-and-fast rule I have is "no sugar." Everything else is a guideline. But like some others, if I can get "no sugar" right, then the rest of my diet naturally falls into place.

synger
08-21-2008, 05:47 PM
While I have some rules and guidelines I follow, as above, I also try really hard not to allow myself to get overwhelmed. I'm not making choices for the rest of my life. I'm making choices for the next planned snack, and the next meal, and by extension the next day. Maybe I'll think about a few options for the next week. But I will not think about next week, or next month, or next year. My choices are right now. If I think about next week, I get overwhelmed and wonder if I can do it. But right now, I can do.

It's just the next meal. Protein, veg, and brown (whole grain carb). Maybe some fruit. That's all I worry about right now.

And when enough "next meals" have gone by, I find that I have much healthier habits overall, without having too many rules or guidelines.

JulieJ08
08-21-2008, 06:04 PM
I'm not making choices for the rest of my life. I'm making choices for the next planned snack, and the next meal, and by extension the next day.

Wow, a good thing to remember.

Rosinante
08-21-2008, 07:03 PM
My rules are
to record everything I eat
to say 'no' when offered something between meals (it becomes an automatic response if I train myself that the answer is always 'no'; if I give myself options as to when I Might take what's on offer, then I always will)
to cook myself a small portion of X first, with the promise that I'll go back and cook more if I'm still truly hungry
to stay at a sensible calorie number and not be tempted to go too low (so sometimes I have to have a deliberate extra, because if I do the small portion thing above, I very rarely go back for more and can feel full on very little
and
(new rule for this time)
record weight gains as well as losses - I need to learn not to fear fluctuations, and also to understand why they happen

mollymom
08-21-2008, 11:04 PM
KAPLODS you cracked me right up. I am a fifty year old woman on the outside..well almost fifty,,,,just practising saying it and am still wondering when they are going to catch me and realize I am just impersonating an adult and that I have really fake ID (even computer aged the picture..they must have done)! I know exactly what you mean. I said to someone today "They can make me be fifty, but they can't make me act it!"

Rules.. a teacher's favourite word. I hadn't really thought about this but I realized I have made a few:

a) Never eat in the shower (just kidding)

b) (For real) In my town, there is a huge tradition of french fry trucks down by the river. THEY are just too good. I let myself have them ONCE a summer. AND I get the BIGGEST plate they have, I eat every one!

c) Only whole grains..be it bread, pasta, rice etc. and I am to aim for 30 plus grams of fiber in a day

d) only olive oil as much as possible

e) go to my TOPS meeting every single week unless I absolutely can't avoid missing it.

f) weigh or measure my food and write it down..I use Fitday

g) read labels religiously...for not only calories but fiber, nutrients, sodium

h) a reward for every five pounds...I have waited three weeks for it but tonight I can now get my facial:^:

Pandora123a
08-22-2008, 09:45 AM
KimL1214,

Eating in the living room probably isn't a problem. If you want a rule to replace the eating at the table rule, just say the rule is when I'm eating that is what I am doing...not watching tv.

The academic reason for this is that it not only reduces the triggers for eating (turning on the tv then doesn't symbolize time to eat) but it makes eating the primary activity that you are paying attention to, less likely that you will eat mindlessly during an exciting or funny moment. Being really aware of what you are eating is the goal!

kaplods
08-22-2008, 11:16 AM
thanks mollymom,

I also say that if I'm ever tempted to lie about my age, I'm lying up (so instead of people suspecting I'm lying or look horrible for my age, they'll tell me how young I look). I'm not 42, I'm 60.

I just realized though in your post, that I very do have rules in my life (I guess I'm just so opposed to the concept of "rules" that I don't call them that).

Attending my TOPS group is not something I consider an option. I guess I consider it a promise to myself and the group rather than a rule. When the leader in our group told us she wanted to step down, and I was asked if I would accept the nomination for co-leader (the co-leader was nominated for the leader position), I saw it as a way not only to contribute to the organization that I found so helpful, but that the added responsibility would keep me going.

Without realizing it my husband provided even another reason. He accepted the nomination for treasurer and we were both voted in. I was shocked, because hubby had said earlier that he'd had no interest in being an officer, and I asked him why he'd accepted the nomination then, and why he voted for himself. He said that he didn't expect to win the election, and didn't want to have zero votes (like I wouldn't vote for my own husband).

As it turned out, he very much likes being treasurer. It gives him a sense of responsibility and usefullness to the club (though I don't think he'd put it that way). When he had to go on disability, he was much more traumatized about it than when I had to. Of course, I still have the hope of being able to return to work if my conditions go into remission (which is possible). For my husband, his disorder is progressive, and even losing the weight may slow,but won't stop the disease. His identity was so wrapped up in his job, that being on disability has been horrible for his mental state. The treasurer position seemed to give him a little more of his "self" back. It's a small job, but I can tell he feels useful again.

JulieJ08
08-22-2008, 11:28 AM
I also say that if I'm ever tempted to lie about my age, I'm lying up (so instead of people suspecting I'm lying or look horrible for my age, they'll tell me how young I look). I'm not 42, I'm 60.

LOL, my older ... cough, I mean better ;) ... sister always says the same thing!

twilit tera
08-22-2008, 11:43 AM
Cool...I'm not the only one with a chorus in my head!!! :)

...

This is a bit off topic, but I was telling my therapist last week about my "personality theory." I told him that we don't really become different people, we just add layers to the people we are, so buried under years of experience, somewhere inside, there's still a 4 year old girl inside me, with demands and needs of her own. He loved it.

Back on topic, I'm still working out what I need to make this work, but my first rule has been to eat only until I'm not hungry any more - before I start feeling full.

Something that is not a rule but could become one is that if I've just eaten and still feel hungry, I'll do something else to get my mind off it for five minutes, then check back with myself as to whether I'm still hungry - then eat something light.

My second rule (starting this morning) is to write everything down. I'm not counting calories (yet) but just making a list of all I've eaten, where and when. That way I can look for triggers, see what satisfies me, work through what's working when I lose weight and what doesn't when I don't.

Oh and I'm going to reward myself with stickers on my food diary for every week I'm on plan, whether I lose or not. :twirly:

Tera

Lyn2007
08-22-2008, 01:15 PM
This has turned into a fantastic thread! I am saving it.

I am definitely going to be careful with the rules, and try stating them positively. My head has been in a bad place this week and I need to get back into the swing of things.

About the "no eating in the shower"... LOL... I had a friend who used to eat in the bath and shower ALL THE TIME! (She told me so... we were diet buddies!) She said she would sit in there soaking in tub and and wolf down a box of chocolates! Or get into the shower and carefully perch the cookie box on the back of the toilet where she could reach them!! Well I never went THAT far :)

Schmoodle
08-22-2008, 01:28 PM
It's interesting to see how different everyone's approach is, and so true, what works for some doesn't work for others.
For me, I need the rules, although not too many of them and there has to be a purpose, not just rules for rules' sake.
The "rules" make the "choices" easier, which leads to development of "habits."
As in, "I really want to eat this little piece of chocolate, surely that won't hurt."
"No wait, the rule is, get through the week on plan, then my weekend chocolate is my reward."

momjeeps
08-22-2008, 01:29 PM
Yep, great thread! Who ever could have thought of such a wonderful topic but my buddy Lyn ;-)

I guess I'll have to work on my bath/shower eating habbits... OK, no its not me. I can't say that I've ever eaten in the tub that I recall. Although if I did it was definitely Chocolate LOL.

My "rules". Anything I want. ONE PORTION! One piece of cheesecake is not going to make me fat. But half a cheesecake just may. OK it DID! That and a bag of chips and a bottle of Dr. Pepper and...

Here are some other triggers I try to keep out of the house:

1. Soda (Actually not a trigger, but just a bad idea for the whole family.)
2. Chips
3. Snack Crackers (i.e. cheese its)
4. Premade baked goods (If I make it it will not have transfats, just the lovely refined sugar. Hey, its a better choice and its progress. Also I have to make a conscious decision to bake cookies. Whereas if I had a bag of cookies in the pantry I'd mindlessly pick at them all day long.)

Some other things that I've changed.

1. Make smaller batches when I do bake. With a family of six that leaves little or no leftovers to call my name.
2. Do more active things with my children. They love to hike and swim.
3. Blog and be active in a healthy community exchange like this one!
4. No Soda (OK, maybe a jack and coke on occassion)

A motto I stole from somewhere... Progress not perfection! (I think it was flylady.)

Vonavie

JulieJ08
08-22-2008, 01:52 PM
About the "no eating in the shower"... LOL... I had a friend who used to eat in the bath and shower ALL THE TIME! (She told me so... we were diet buddies!) She said she would sit in there soaking in tub and and wolf down a box of chocolates! Or get into the shower and carefully perch the cookie box on the back of the toilet where she could reach them!! Well I never went THAT far :)

Ah, well never in the shower. But I polished off many a pint of ice cream or bunch of crackers or cookies in the tub.

Pandora123a
08-22-2008, 08:41 PM
The shower seems really hard for me...but I also indulged in chocolate and potato chips in the hourlong baths I took as a teenager.

Lyn2007
08-23-2008, 12:19 PM
Vonavie! Hi! So good to see you here :)

Star2Be
08-23-2008, 08:12 PM
Ah, well never in the shower. But I polished off many a pint of ice cream or bunch of crackers or cookies in the tub.
Same here. :o I felt really embarrassed to read that... I guess it does seem kind of ridiculous from the outside! I'm kinda glad that I'm not the only one, though.