Weight and Resistance Training - What is the better calorie burn?




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ViolinJenn
07-30-2008, 01:02 PM
So my question lately is this.

Which is the better calorie burn? Jogging on the treadmill at 5.7mph, eliptical at level 11 or stationary bike at level 8 or 9?

I generally do not pay attention to the display that tells you how many calories you've burnt, but I would like to know which would be more effecient at burning the fat for my 40min of cardio.:ebike::tread::running:


luckymommy
07-30-2008, 01:15 PM
I don't know the answer to that question, but maybe you could do each of those for a few minutes and see what the display says. It might not be accurate, but at least it will give you an estimate. I think it's good to switch things up to keep your body guessing anyway. Sorry I couldn't be of more help!

Meg
07-30-2008, 01:21 PM
Hi Jenn!

The number of calories you burn doing any exercise is determined by your heart rate. It doesn't matter which piece of equipment you're using -- calories burned are totally dependent on HR. So if your HR is 150 on the bike, for example, 150 on the treadmill, and 150 on the elliptical, then you're burning exactly the same number of calories per minute on each piece of equipment.

So the answer to your question is -- the piece of equipment that raises YOUR heart rate the highest. :)


luckymommy
07-30-2008, 02:00 PM
I was under the impression that the more large muscle groups you use, the more calories you burn because even though your heart rate is the same, more work is getting done (could be a myth)...but I really don't know that for sure and I'm sure Meg knows better than I! ;)

Insatiable
07-30-2008, 02:05 PM
I have had this question off and on many times now. I agree with Meg. It is the one you feel the best with afterwards and the one you have a higher HR, or I go by sweat. I always want to go on the elliptical because it says it burns more calories, but I never feel like it does. When I run on the treadmill I sweat more than on the ellipitcal so it must be working more. Granted I love the elliptical because it is soft on my joints. The bike for me I don't feel anything for in the gym, but spinning class, i would not miss it for the world. I am drenched after words so it has to be the best.

WaterRat
07-30-2008, 04:52 PM
Insatiable - funny, I get my heart rate up much higher on the elliptical than on the treadmill. :) I think it's because it hurts my knees to go too fast on the treadmill. We do however have 2 new gorgeous big treadmills at my gym - really nice long beds, and I'll have to try going fast on them and see how the impact level is.

Insatiable
07-30-2008, 04:57 PM
You know I actually have not watched the heart rate level lately ever since my HRM was lying to me. When I did wear it though my HR was higher on the elliptical. Thanks to this thread I went out on my lunch break and just bought me a new one. This one better not lie to me.

txsqlchick
07-30-2008, 05:31 PM
My heart rate on the elliptical goes up past 160 bpm sometimes. That's almost double my resting heart rate.

Should I dial it back a little? I don't feel dizzy or short of breath when my heart is beating that fast but I also would prefer to not kill myself.

Meg
07-30-2008, 05:36 PM
It all depends on how old you are. If you're 80, dial it back. If you're 53 like me, you're pushing yourself but it's still OK. If you're younger than I am (and almost everyone is!), no worries. :D

BTW, I can hit triple my resting HR without any problems. You most definitely aren't going to kill yourself. It sounds like a great workout! :carrot:

The simplest way to figure your heart rate zones is to first determine your max HR by subtracting your age from 220. Then find which zone you're in:

Low intensity exercise = 65 - 75% of your max HR

Moderate intensity exercise = 75 - 85% of max HR

High intensity exercise = 85 - 90% of max HR

Check and see where 160 puts you. :)

txsqlchick
07-30-2008, 05:41 PM
It all depends on how old you are. If you're 80, dial it back. If you're 53 like me, you're pushing yourself but it's still OK. If you're younger than I am (and almost everyone is!), no worries. :D

BTW, I can hit triple my resting HR without any problems. You most definitely aren't going to kill yourself. It sounds like a great workout! :carrot:

I'm 33, I weigh 244.6 lbs, and I have hypertension (and a strong family history of heart disease). My doctor freaked out on me in May when I went in for a regular appointment; she took my bp and it was something like 172/120, hr 122. Going to the doc makes me nervous, but she said that was "stroke level blood pressure" and urged me not to begin any exercise program without talking to a cardiologist. She also sent me to the emergency room for my blood pressure. She's a gynecologist, so this is outside of her area of expertise. The ER doc said as much when he took my BP after an hour in the waiting room and it was 138/85, hr 90.

I think I'm going to find a new gyno. She's paranoid. I don't want to be under a cardiologist's care because I don't want it on my medical record. I'd rather just exercise, eat healthy, and lose weight since that's all they're going to tell me to do anyway.

Lydia227
07-30-2008, 06:40 PM
I went in for a regular appointment; she took my bp and it was something like 172/120, hr 122. ...she said that was "stroke level blood pressure"...She's a gynecologist...I'd rather just exercise, eat healthy, and lose weight since that's all they're going to tell me to do anyway.

Hi Txsqlchick :wave: Similar story here too. I went in for my annual exam with my gynecologist. After taking my blood pressure she refused to renew my script for birth control pills. She also scheduled an appointment for me with a physician she thought could assist me in bringing these numbers in line. He placed me on blood pressure meds and I also found out that I have a hypothyroid as well. During the course of that year I managed both of those conditions through the scripts and ...healthier eating and daily intentional exercise. By the end of that year I had lost 50 pounds and was able to incorporate more intense levels of cardio and weight lifting. During my followup last month he advised me to cut my blood pressure meds in half. He thinks I should be able to finally wean myself off of these meds since I've lost the weight and have made a commitment to fitness. In my case, clean eating and intentional exercise has given me the opportunity to drop the meds but I'm glad those options were available to me to safely begin the journey ;) Good Luck! :hug:

Oh and by the way, my Gyno was thrilled for me the year later. :goodvibes:

WaterRat
07-30-2008, 08:36 PM
Txsqlchick and Lydia - my gyn told me the same. She did, however, advise me to get a bp cuff and check my bp at home for several weeks to see how much was "MD syndrome" :) or the fact that I had been rushing around when I got to her office, or whatever. Mine had been fine for years, and then they lowered the standards it was higher than the new standard. She eventually sent me to an internist since you're right - it's not really what a gyn does. She had also been monitoring my cholesterol for several years too, as I have a family history of high cholesterol and eventually she gave me meds for that, which the internist now monitors as well. The gyn now only does my actual gyn stuff.....

And, hmmm, Meg, we've had this HR discussion before. I'm ten years older than you (63) and according to the formula, my max HR is 157, making 90% 141. I consistently hit higher than that while doing intervals on the elliptical. I probably should get an HR monitor instead of relying on the machine's readings, eh? Maybe I'll ask for one for my birthday...... :)

Mel
07-31-2008, 07:32 AM
The danger issue is not how high your heart rate goes if you are in good shape, but how quickly it returns to normal. Do some googling- I don't remember the numbers off hand and have to rush to work. If your heart rate stays up there without a significant drop when you drop the intensity to the equivalent of a walk for X number of seconds, then you want to dial back the intensity.

Sorry for the brevity...
Mel

ViolinJenn
07-31-2008, 07:32 AM
Thank you so much for the advise ladies!:hug:

Since it's my HR that I need to focus on, I'm going to buy one so I'll know how to change things up. I think one of the watch styles will be best for me, but I'll have to do some research.

I forgot that 3FC had this exercise forum. I've just started weight training May 2007, I spent that first year with a trainer but cannot afford it with this wonderfully crappy ecomony we have. I've been posting on another site that is geared towards "women weightlifting/physique competitors" while the info is priceless, I just didn't feel welcome or any support. I may have some questions as I try to figure out how to continue workingout while having a full-time job and returning to college part-time after a 13 year hiatus. My plan as of now is to do a full body workout 3 days a week with cardio and just cardio on a 4th day.

Everyone here at 3FC is so friendly, supportive and helpful it makes losing weight a little less stressful.:hug::hug::hug:

WaterRat
07-31-2008, 02:11 PM
The danger issue is not how high your heart rate goes if you are in good shape, but how quickly it returns to normal.

Oh, yes. Mine comes back down pretty quickly to close to normal. I would definitely scale back if it didn't. :) Heck, I might implode. :lol:

Matilda08
08-01-2008, 09:05 AM
This was very helpful!