Weight Loss Support - Why You're Not Losing Weight




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Zima
07-24-2008, 09:48 PM
This article was on AOL news, and I thought it was interesting:

You don't have to be a rocket scientist to know that extra calories will make you fat. Yet calories aren't the only weight woe you should worry about. As it turns out, your day may be loaded with traps that could be keeping you heavy, and most of them aren't so obvious -- like your credit cards or even your best friend. Take a look at these surprising factors behind weight gain.

1. You buy your lunch with a credit card

People who pay for their food with a credit card spend 30 percent more on average than people who pay with cash, according to a Visa study of 100,000 restaurant transactions. Thirty percent more money, translates into more food (and calories and fat) you don't need. The next time you dine out, pull out the cash.

2. You're a meat-eater

Where's the beef? It could very well be on your hips. Researchers asked over 55,000 women to classify themselves as either omnivores, semivegetarians, lactovegetarians or vegans. A whopping 40 percent of omnivores were either overweight or obese while only 29 percent of semivegetarians and vegans and 25 percent of lactovegeterians had these weight issues. To slim down, eat more plant foods and less animal products.

3. You eat at church functions

Blame it on the between-service cookies, potluck suppers and ice cream socials but Baptists, Fundamentalist Protestants, pietistic Protestants and Catholics have the highest rates of obesity among religious folks, according to a Purdue University researcher. Avoid splurging at food-oriented church activities and look to your church for help with your diet: Many have faith-based weight-loss programs.

4. You dine in a group

Other diners may make you overindulge. With one other person, you eat 35 percent more. Yet when seven or more are at your table, you could eat 96 percent more. Not interested in eating alone? Just sit next to someone who eats slowly, as they'll help set your eating pace.

5. You drink diet soda

Diet and other artificially sweetened foods may not be so waistline-friendly after all. When rats ate yogurt sweetened with no-calorie saccharin, they later noshed nine percent more, gained 25 percent more weight and added more body fat, according to a study from Behavioral Neuroscience. It's too early to tell how this applies to people, but if you're concerned about weight, ditching fake sugars may help. Just don't switch to regular soda or you could really pack on the pounds -- drink water instead.

6. You're married

When you took your vows, you may not have realized you were also signing up to be partners in weight gain. Yet a 32-year study found that if one spouse becomes obese, the other spouse was 37 percent more likely to be obese. The obvious solution? Encourage each other to adopt healthy habits like exercising regularly and eating healthy.

7. You drive everywhere

Where you live could impact the number on your scale. One study from the American Journal of Obesity found that people living in walkable neighborhoods with access to healthy foods were leaner than people living in less desirable physical environments where they rely mostly on cars for transport.

8. You wear baggy clothing

You're quick to notice you've put on some pounds when you struggle to zip your jeans, but if you frequently wear oversized clothing, you may not notice the pounds creeping on. You don't have to don a tight outfit to keep your weight check, but you might consider weighing yourself regularly to avoid a sneaky gain.

9. You have heavy friends

It's true: Obesity is contagious. Researchers examined the social networks of over 12,000 people for over 30 years and found that having an obese friend increased a person's risk of being obese by 57 percent. The odds were even greater if they were close friends or the same sex. Don't think you have to ditch your friends, though. Instead, meet for a walk instead of a latte or take a fitness class together rather than hitting the movies.

10. You don't drink alcohol

Here's a surprise: The odds of obesity were 17 percent lower for people who consumed one or two drinks daily than for non-drinkers, according to a study of over 8,000 non-smokers. Heavy drinkers, however, were more likely to be obese. Don't take this as an okay to start drinking, especially if you don't already. But if you are currently consuming alcohol, make sure you're keeping it to a healthy minimum.

11. You rarely see the sun

Dermatologists have been warning against sun exposure for years, but there may be good reason to let a little light into your life. Obesity has been associated with lower vitamin D levels, and sunshine is one of the best ways to increase those levels. Although you still need to be cautious about how much sun you get, some experts recommend getting up to 20 minutes of unprotected exposure (except the hands and face) daily.


walking2lose
07-24-2008, 10:23 PM
Several interesting points on here. At first they all seem like common sense, but some of them I have never thought of before.

Thanks for sharing!

RealCdn
07-24-2008, 10:35 PM
2. You're a meat-eater

5. You drink diet soda

7. You drive everywhere

8. You wear baggy clothing



I love to argue points from experts.

1 - my weight loss has been more consistent since I increased my protein levels.

5 - although I drink less, I still drink from time to time, and my alcoholic drink of choice for this summer is made with Splenda.

7 - still do this, probably still will

8 - yep, because it's all too big now :D


LukesMommy1987
07-25-2008, 12:19 AM
I like them all except the vitamin D one. It's much more likely that obesity isn't triggered on by lack of sunlight, but rather more overweight people spend more time inside sitting on the couch than their slimmer counterparts and therefore have lower vitamin D. Linked, yes, but this article might lead a lot of people to believe sun is healthy in some amounts- you can get vitamin D from other sources!

The media likes to twists studies around to be more interesting no matter how socially irresponsible what they are suggesting might be.

Also, I definitely have friends that are "fat enablers..." we always eat out together, sometimes I smoke with them...ah!

cephalopod gal
07-25-2008, 12:29 AM
These seem pretty interesting, but I'd like to see the research behind these statements. A lot of those things seem pretty correlational, which means that there could be several extraneous variables going on. It just so happens that people who are overweight do X, but it could be because doing X also stems from behavior Y which is the real cause of the obesity.

UrsusMaritimus
07-25-2008, 02:42 AM
What the heck is a "semi-vegetarian?" Either you eat meat or you don't eat meat.

Interesting post. I agree that it would be important to look at the science behind these claims before accepting them. Correlation does not equal causation.

betsysunqueen
07-25-2008, 04:46 AM
What the heck is a "semi-vegetarian?" Either you eat meat or you don't eat meat.



Haha. While I agree with you, I think what the article is describing is the same thing as a "flexitarian."

Wikipedia defines this as a "semi-vegetarian diet involving the practice of eating mainly vegetarian food, but making occasional exceptions for social, pragmatic, cultural, or nutritional reasons. There is a wide range in the circumstances and outer boundaries of their dietary practices, which resist easy classification. Flexitarians are not vegetarians because animal flesh is not what vegetarians consume."

ForABetterLife
07-25-2008, 04:55 AM
What the heck is a "semi-vegetarian?" Either you eat meat or you don't eat meat.


some people call me this because I only eat chicken and sometimes turkey. Never any pork, or red meat, or fish (I cant).

I also eat a ton of veggies and sometimes tofu and similar items. I don't consider myself a semi-vegetarian, but I am by others.

CousinRockingChair
07-25-2008, 06:40 AM
Haha. I'm not sure I'd buy anything I read on AOL! You know what the media's like.

srmb60
07-25-2008, 07:06 AM
I'd read this as "things some overweight folks have in common". Not necessarily even symptoms and certainly not causes.

Does it make more sense that way?

JayEll
07-25-2008, 07:36 AM
It's a pretty shallow article. Correlation does not equal cause-and-effect.

But, just for the record, most doctors do agree that some sun exposure is healthy. Our skin is made to manufacture vitamin D from the UV in sunlight, regardless of race--and vitamin D is necessary for strong bones. That's why calcium supplements also often contain vitamin D. That said, the amount of sunlight exposure needed is minimal--something like 5 to 30 minutes twice a week, without sunscreen, and depending on climate and time of day.

The one about alcohol is especially silly. Just what every alcoholic longs to hear...

Jay

rockinrobin
07-25-2008, 07:42 AM
I'm pretty much thinking most of it is a bunch of hooey. I know, a strange word to use.

But I mean, come on, people who drink diet soda "nosh" more. Such a great technical term.

I think Susan pretty much summed it up.

Tomato
07-25-2008, 08:35 AM
I love to argue points from experts.

Me two!!

1. I rarely eat out but when I do, I always pay with MC because I collect points. But that does not mean I eat more - I have whatever I would be having if I paid cash.

2. On the contrary, I had to increase the intake of meat in order to have more protein - although I do choose leaner meat.

3. I don't go to church.
4. I don't dine in a group.
5. I don't drink soda
6. Not married
7. Yes, I do drive everywhere but not that's not by choice. Not everybody has a grocery store around the corner. I do plenty of walking with dogs.
8. Baggy clothing - not really.
9. I don't have one heavy friend but the rest are between thin and average.
10. This one is true - I am not a drinker.
11. Yeap, I rarely see the skin but my ultra fair skin and rosacea are the reason. Even if I was skinny and with no rosacea, you would not find me on a beach. I am a shade loving creature.

UrsusMaritimus
07-25-2008, 11:48 AM
Wikipedia defines this as a "semi-vegetarian diet involving the practice of eating mainly vegetarian food, but making occasional exceptions for social, pragmatic, cultural, or nutritional reasons.

Ahhhhh. I've never heard of a "flexitarian." Reminds me of my favorite category of sexual identity, "heteroflexible." ;)

Mollikins
07-25-2008, 12:40 PM
Another load of crapola used to scare people. :rolleyes: Ya know what they say Proof is in the sugar free/fat free puddin .......

1. You buy your lunch with a credit card I brown bag it M-F -- I prepare my sammies/snacks @ home where I'M in control of what I consume.

2. You're a meat-eater Rarely eat red meat ...... more like if I eat any more poultry, I'ma gonna sprout feathers & start clucking.

3. You eat at church functions Last time I was in a Church was for my Pop's funeral -- food was THE last thing on my mind.

4. You dine in a group Kinda true, but not. True we DO get together , but we nosh on healthily prepared foods @ each other's homes.

5. You drink diet soda Semi-guilty: 2-12oz cans cans per day -- still consume waaaaaaaay more water than diet soda, like 10 to 1.

6. You're married **** NO ... NUH-UH, NO WAY !! Single & gonna stay that way !

7. You drive everywhere Well, yeah D'UH, I live out in the boonies & the closest store is approx. 5 miles -- lonnnnnnnnng way to lug groceries back from. And it's 10 miles one way to work -- either taking state highway or interstate, neith of which is condusive (READ : safe) to ride a bkie on.

8. You wear baggy clothing bzzzzzzzzzzzzt -- wrong again ! I wear comfortable clothing.

9. You have heavy friends Some are & some aren't -- it's not like we LIVE TOGETHER & see each other every day, kinda hard to be a bad influence that way !

10. You don't drink alcohol
As ridiculous as this "statistic" appears, it won't change the fact that I'm allergic to alcohol (HONEST -- been verified by Docs & everything !) so I'm lucky to be able to consume 3-4 beers A YEAR

11. You rarely see the sun As an office manager for a property management org, I see PLENTY of El Sol ....... not to mention VA gets sun most days of the week year round.

Hmmmmmmmm, looks like I'm the ATYPICAL fatty. :lol3::lol3:

CousinRockingChair
07-25-2008, 12:52 PM
It's good indeed to correct experts, but these arn't experts, so unfortunately my pleasure is denied on this occasion!

Ija
07-25-2008, 01:25 PM
Some of the comments here remind me of something a friend once said to me a few years ago when I encouraged her to start wearing a seat belt. I mentioned the fact that people who buckle up survive accidents at a much higher rate than people who don't. She completely dismissed the idea because she once knew somebody who always wore a seat belt but was nonetheless killed in an accident. In her mind, that one exception proved that seat belts don't matter.

I think it's important to realize that although your own personal experiences might not be totally in sync with the research findings, the results may still be lawful and meaningful.

JayEll
07-25-2008, 01:34 PM
That's true enough, Drina, but I'd have to see the actual studies, not someone's oversimplified summary of them, before I would believe anything.

By the way--I always wear a seatbelt! I was once injured in an accident where I wasn't wearing one (because the car didn't have them--and now you know how old I must be... :lol:). I really got the point! Not only that, but no one rides in my car unless they also put on their seatbelt.

Jay

Ija
07-25-2008, 02:38 PM
Jay, I wholeheartedly agree that it's important to review the actual research rather than buying into media reports. Unfortunately, the media almost always gets it wrong when it describes scientific studies (just take a look at the embarrassingly inaccurate headlines and reviews of the latest round of low carb vs. low fat research). But that doesn't seem to be what's going on here. Some are outright dismissing the research (and showing disdain for the researchers) because the findings don't describe them. It's the seat belt thing all over again.

PhotoChick
07-25-2008, 02:47 PM
Wow. Did anyone actually READ the lead paragraph, or just skim the bullet points. I don't see this as a "scare" article and nowhere does it say that these things *cause* obesity.

The article says that these are things that MAY be hindering your ability to lose weight. Quote: "your day may be loaded with traps that could be keeping you heavy"

I totally agree that these are things for many of us that affect (not CAUSE) the status of our weight.

I don't understand the need to make this article into more than it says it is.

.

horsey
07-25-2008, 02:49 PM
1. You buy your lunch with a credit card - I travel for business and have to agree with this one. I'm on a "money diet" too and used more cash on my last trip, and in using cash I eyed the dollar menus more, plus too along more of my own healthy snacks. When we use credit cards we don't think as much, and eat more.

2. You're a meat-eater - I've cut back on my favorite burgers, bought those soy burgers and eat them often for lunch at home and I agree, being a semi vegetarian helps cut calories... heck those burgers don't have many calories compared to my former 500+ calorie burgers. And if one wants to lose more weight I'm reading cut meat and substitute less fattening soy burgers, etc....

3. You eat at church functions... I don't know, it's not just church functions it's ALL functions and get togethers with horrible appetizers, fat burgers and hot dogs this time of year isn't it?

4. You dine in a group - not so sure about this one either. Eating alone is a problem for me, pigging out at fast food.

5. You drink diet soda - Diane Sawyer drinks diet coke all morning and look at her at her AGE! Yes studies go on and on about diet coke but it beats other alternatives.

6. You're married - I got fat my first year of marriage. Articles say us women should eat 1/3 less then our husbands, so no wonder we eat more when married. And we eat because of the stress of marriage too! But I ate more when I separated because of depression. So what, we eat when we are happy with husbands and we eat more when without them? Men, can't live with them, can't live without them but we women need to stop eating so much to deal with stress!

7. You drive everywhere -I drive a lot on trips, am learning how to keep healthy stacks in my car. I think driving puts one in that hurry mode, harder to sit down, we need to sit down and eat mindfully. And as gas is up, we're all driving less anyways, does that mean waists are going down in a poor economy?

8. You wear baggy clothing - Yes, don't start buying larger clothes to begin with, set a 5 lb point you don't go over, have some more stretchy clothes to fit into when on the larger side but NEVER buy fat clothes and box up the skinny clothes. Been there, done that.

9. You have heavy friends - trying to make more healthy friends for support here, hanging out less with fat people does help. It's a mind set.

10. You don't drink alcohol - opposite for those of us who can't have just one drink, personally I stay away from it. If a person can exercise control studies that show 1-2 drinks helps.. I don't know. Mixed on this one.

11. You rarely see the sun - me, former beach bum, staying out of the sun, have wrinkles from my baby oil tanning days. BUT what's this one? Don't you think people in sunny areas are thinner then those of us in colder states? I mean we cover up with sweaters and winter clothes half the year, in Calif I see a lot of older thin women, more then here. I'd say the sun would encourage one to be thin - tank tops and swim suits year round?

flowerrosy
07-25-2008, 03:08 PM
I think #9 could go either way. Depending on if you and your spouse spend time eating together or exercising together. Having someone to support your healthy habits and exercise with you can actually help you lose weight. But, on the other hand, if your partner buys candy and chocolate for you it can make you fat.

midwife
07-25-2008, 03:38 PM
Hi Zima,
Thanks for posting this. I think that most of these illustrate how obesigenic our culture really is. My comments will be in red below.

This article was on AOL news, and I thought it was interesting:

You don't have to be a rocket scientist to know that extra calories will make you fat. Yet calories aren't the only weight woe you should worry about. As it turns out, your day may be loaded with traps that could be keeping you heavy, and most of them aren't so obvious -- like your credit cards or even your best friend. Take a look at these surprising factors behind weight gain.

1. You buy your lunch with a credit card

People who pay for their food with a credit card spend 30 percent more on average than people who pay with cash, according to a Visa study of 100,000 restaurant transactions. Thirty percent more money, translates into more food (and calories and fat) you don't need. The next time you dine out, pull out the cash.
This is true for me. I rarely carry cash and using a card makes it so easy to buy food instead of waiting for lunch at home and it is easy to not pack a lunch if I know I can just buy one quickly. Eating out is always a calorie killer for me---my eyes were opened by a 700 calorie grilled veggie sandwich. :eek: I guess the main thing is, I will not withdraw cash in general for food, so if I put away the cards, I eat at home.
2. You're a meat-eater

Where's the beef? It could very well be on your hips. Researchers asked over 55,000 women to classify themselves as either omnivores, semivegetarians, lactovegetarians or vegans. A whopping 40 percent of omnivores were either overweight or obese while only 29 percent of semivegetarians and vegans and 25 percent of lactovegeterians had these weight issues. To slim down, eat more plant foods and less animal products.
This is also true for me. Beef is really loaded with calories compared to other proteins in similar portion sizes. I can have 6 oz of tilapia for fewer calories that 3 or 4 ounces of beef.

3. You eat at church functions

Blame it on the between-service cookies, potluck suppers and ice cream socials but Baptists, Fundamentalist Protestants, pietistic Protestants and Catholics have the highest rates of obesity among religious folks, according to a Purdue University researcher. Avoid splurging at food-oriented church activities and look to your church for help with your diet: Many have faith-based weight-loss programs.
Social eating in general is difficult. And potlucks!! Yikes--tons of casseroles with who-knows-what creamed soups added....the carbs! The loaded plates! But that goes for all social occasions really. I know I have to be extra cautious in these situations.

4. You dine in a group

Other diners may make you overindulge. With one other person, you eat 35 percent more. Yet when seven or more are at your table, you could eat 96 percent more. Not interested in eating alone? Just sit next to someone who eats slowly, as they'll help set your eating pace.
When I eat out with a group it is a rare and "special" occasion, so I know I eat more. First, those calorie laden restaurant dishes, large portion sizes that are difficult for me to limit as a card-carrying member of the clean plate club, and a more relaxed approach to food in general, again as a "special" occasion.

5. You drink diet soda

Diet and other artificially sweetened foods may not be so waistline-friendly after all. When rats ate yogurt sweetened with no-calorie saccharin, they later noshed nine percent more, gained 25 percent more weight and added more body fat, according to a study from Behavioral Neuroscience. It's too early to tell how this applies to people, but if you're concerned about weight, ditching fake sugars may help. Just don't switch to regular soda or you could really pack on the pounds -- drink water instead.
I don't drink soda anymore, diet or otherwise. Unless I am eating out! See why I avoid eating out in general??

6. You're married

When you took your vows, you may not have realized you were also signing up to be partners in weight gain. Yet a 32-year study found that if one spouse becomes obese, the other spouse was 37 percent more likely to be obese. The obvious solution? Encourage each other to adopt healthy habits like exercising regularly and eating healthy.
My personal experience and my observation with my patients is that this is true. If I eat like my husband does, forget it! So now I eat differently than he does. And I have lost almost 50 pounds.

7. You drive everywhere

Where you live could impact the number on your scale. One study from the American Journal of Obesity found that people living in walkable neighborhoods with access to healthy foods were leaner than people living in less desirable physical environments where they rely mostly on cars for transport.
I agree that our car-dependent culture contributes to obesity. I really need to make more of an effort to ride my bike as much as possible.
8. You wear baggy clothing

You're quick to notice you've put on some pounds when you struggle to zip your jeans, but if you frequently wear oversized clothing, you may not notice the pounds creeping on. You don't have to don a tight outfit to keep your weight check, but you might consider weighing yourself regularly to avoid a sneaky gain.
I'm doing some serious laundry today and I am tossing all the clothes I wore at my high weights. They almost all have stretch waistbands. I agree with the regular weighing too.

9. You have heavy friends

It's true: Obesity is contagious. Researchers examined the social networks of over 12,000 people for over 30 years and found that having an obese friend increased a person's risk of being obese by 57 percent. The odds were even greater if they were close friends or the same sex. Don't think you have to ditch your friends, though. Instead, meet for a walk instead of a latte or take a fitness class together rather than hitting the movies.
It's nice to share a binge with like-minded individuals. For some reason, a lot of my friends are changing their lifestyles for health too, so walking at lunch together is even nicer!

10. You don't drink alcohol

Here's a surprise: The odds of obesity were 17 percent lower for people who consumed one or two drinks daily than for non-drinkers, according to a study of over 8,000 non-smokers. Heavy drinkers, however, were more likely to be obese. Don't take this as an okay to start drinking, especially if you don't already. But if you are currently consuming alcohol, make sure you're keeping it to a healthy minimum.
I rarely drink. I'll have a glass of wine at a restaurant for a special occasion dinner.

11. You rarely see the sun

Dermatologists have been warning against sun exposure for years, but there may be good reason to let a little light into your life. Obesity has been associated with lower vitamin D levels, and sunshine is one of the best ways to increase those levels. Although you still need to be cautious about how much sun you get, some experts recommend getting up to 20 minutes of unprotected exposure (except the hands and face) daily.
This last point is interesting. I know I am outside more now than I was at my heaviest---cause I am running or swimming or biking. For me, an active lifestyle = more time outdoors. Whatever the connection is, this is meaningful for me.

Our culture is set up for obesity, and this is a nice list of things to consider in the context of our culture. We really have to eat and move and live differently than the status quo to kick obesity.

Shannon in ATL
07-25-2008, 04:00 PM
I work in food service, fast food specifically, and I have to agree that people who use credit cards are more likely to spend more on average - over a five year analysis of our receipts we saw that in our restaurants the credit card transactions had a 2-5% higher ticket average than the cash transactions. The credit card purchasers were much more likely to add on cheese, pie, upsize, etc. Did that make them eat more? Don't know. We noticed waste increase at the same time - extra fries or half finished drinks thrown away, that kind of thing...

Ija
07-26-2008, 01:27 AM
Our culture is set up for obesity

midwife, I think that's so true... so many aspects of our culture encourage obesity and make it difficult to prevent or treat it. I sometimes wonder if I would have come as far as I have had I not moved to my current home, where there is a strong collective emphasis on healthy eating and exercise. Being here has made the transition to a healthy lifestyle so much easier for me.

SunshineCA
07-27-2008, 11:16 PM
A good read nonetheless. :book2:

Thanks for sharing. ;)

coachie
07-28-2008, 12:01 AM
The list made some reasonable points, in my mind.

Elizabeth Isabelle
07-28-2008, 12:10 AM
LukesMommy1987 and others -

Experiment for yourself. Eat a meal outside, in the sun, and see if you feel fuller faster. I do - so I guess I should more often...

Gale02
07-28-2008, 08:07 AM
Just a quick comment on number one - that doesn't just apply to food purchases. Studies on credit card usage have shown that people who use credit cards vs cash spend about 25% more money consistently... whether that be on food or clothes or at the drugstore.